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1963 R2 Lark "The Whistler"

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  • Oh ya Bob the battery set up was just for you. wouldn't want to get caught without a battery hold down before the Engine is even in place

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    • Keep up the excellent work!

      Really looking forward to seeing it in Chicago!!

      Craig

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      • Originally posted by studejohn View Post
        Oh ya Bob the battery set up was just for you. wouldn't want to get caught without a battery hold down before the Engine is even in place
        Thanks, John; much appreciated! BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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        • Face Off

          Time for some face off restoration..

          Some before pics of the Speedometer and Tachometer face before restoration..




          The tach meter movement was cleaned and checked and calibrated..



          Since this is a lengthy process to restore the face I did a few more.. I kept one of the original Tach faces to make sure I matched it as best I could..




          Restored Speedo..




          And the Tach



          Since "The Whistler" is an early car, it has a 120 Speedometer in it now, but if the need arises, the 160 speedometer is ready to go in just in case..


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          • You could go into business selling those. Simply gorgeous. I’ll take one of each! I can’t wait to see the finished car. Thank you for posting such detailed pictures throughout the project. It’s a great reference point for others who want to restore their’s correctly. Thanks, Seb.

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            • You guy's are just amazing!!!! I am just in awe of the detail you're restoring this car, and the quality of your workmanship is top notch. I will be looking forward to the finished work of art. Bill

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              • This thread has been running for over six years now, and I have enjoyed the updates and the workmanship, the whole way. I normally just click on the last page to see what is new, but today, just for fun, I went back to the beginning and went through the photos of the car, the way it started. The way that it looks now, is even more impressive after refreshing my memory. Keep up the good work, and I am anxious to see it finished!

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                • OK just how did you do those faceplates? I need a class.

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                  • Originally posted by Mrs K Corbin View Post
                    OK just how did you do those face plates? I need a class.

                    Commentary: First off, I don't want to wonder off the topic of "The Whistler," (hi-jack the thread) but since it is part of the restoration, I'll talk about it here. If you want to critique what I wrote, I'll be happy to do off line in PMs. I'm not in the business of doing these on a continuous basis, however, I am in contact with a Professional that is willing to possibly take on orders. If it becomes a reality, I will post a tread and give all the Info..

                    So like Forest Gump, "That's all I have to say about that.."

                    Well, it is a bit of a process as you can imagine. Sorry I did not take pics of the "In-process" of making the gauge. Stewart Warner had the tricks of the trade for making the OEM instruments at the time. It must have been a challenge when an OEM had a concave dial like the Larks, because you cant silkscreen unless its flat.

                    My guess is SW silkscreen first, then final stamped the dial into shape.

                    Here is a link to a service a company offers for custom silkscreen dials. You can see what it takes to do production style dials..
                    http://newvintageusallc.mybigcommerc...reen-printing/

                    If you are a Trekie fan, then you know that Cpt'n Kirk was famous for one thing, "Cheating." So as all lazy people do, I cheated..

                    I scanned in the originals and had to re-draw the dial on-top of the original scanned dial with a CAD program. The fonts were unique to Stude, so I had to generate the character set

                    I then had the art work turned in to transfers. The Odometer and Hi-Beam boxes and holes are on the transfer to aid in alignment on the face during the transfer process.

                    Note: Just a blurry photo.. Sorry..


                    Black paper behind the transfer so you can see it better..


                    Just:
                    • Strip the old face
                    • Primer and paint flat black
                    • Transfer the image to the dial
                    • Spray with a quality 2 part mate clear


                    This was a bit easier to do on the concave dial than flattening for silkscreen.

                    Note: When I stated "transfer," I do not mean a water decal.. these are transfers like the rub-on transfers so each line and number is individually places. After they are clear spray these are as close as you can get to originals as possible without duplicating SW process. They are very durable and the feel is extremely similar to the originals, as is the appearance down to the part number. This process is labor intensive as well as the transfers are pricey, so they are not "cheap.."


                    I also had black numbering done so I can do the Speedo in white dial as well..



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                    • That's some mighty fine work, Seb. BP
                      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                      Ayn Rand:
                      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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                      • Just Freaking WOW!

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                        • Amazing attention to detail. You are to be commended on the outcome.
                          More pics please!
                          Bill

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                          • A bit of a teaser.. But are you all ready to see something really cool?

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                            • Of course we are!!!! Lets see what ya got! Thanks, Bill.

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                              • In viewing this thread, we have seen photos of the Whistler competing in drag races.

                                SO it is a race car.. But what was sort of missing is the results..

                                Mr John Bloom has search his fathers, J.R. Bloom's archives and found some particularly interesting photos.. Results...

                                These pictures must have been meant for a magazine or news article..

                                The bigger trophy with the side pillars and angels with the "9" on it, is the 63 Winter national class champion trophy.



                                Above, Left to right..
                                Ray Tanner: Suit, Owner of Ray Tanner Mortors
                                Floyd Mendenhall: White Shirt, Driver/Mechanic
                                Chuck Bradshaw: Tan Shirt, Owner/Driver







                                Enjoy...



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                                Last edited by SScopelli; 08-13-2019, 11:04 AM.

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