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Studebaker wheelbarrow

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  • Pat Dilling
    replied
    I would think it is certainly possible that over the 6 years from 1852-1858 there may have been design variances depending on improved design, available materials and intended use.

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  • altair
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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ID:	1712768This is from the Studebaker Century book

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  • lugamatic
    replied
    I know a guy who has two stude wheelbarrows above his grainery in his barn, they came east from calf, in the mid 60s with stude wagon and a case steam engine

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  • wlfrench
    replied
    How many Studebaker wheelbarrows are known to be in existence? Even if thousands were made I can't imagine more than a small handful still being here. These things were sold to miners, put to hard use, left out in the weather and discarded when the 49ers gave up and went home.

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  • Hgib
    replied
    I have a studebaker wheelbarrow. My sons gave it to my wife and I along with a 57 golden Hawk for our 50th anniversary. They seem to be scarce on the Internet. Showed a picture of it with the car in the background to an employee at the Studebamer museum in South Bend. It made a big hit. Guess is should put some pictures out.

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  • kurtruk
    replied
    Just to be clear, Pittsburg, CA is spelled differently than Pittsburgh, PA.

    The wheelbarrow listed on CL looks a lot like many reproduction carts coming out of Eastern Europe several years ago being sold as antiques. All nicely patina-ed.

    Twenty-three years ago I rented a room from a guy here in Fresno. Learning of my Studebaker interest, he says, "I've got a Studebaker wheelbarrow right here." In a garden planter was a square-design wooden wheelbarrow, slowly disintegrating in the weather and moisture. A few years later, he tried to move it. It fell apart and he threw it away. I had told him there really wasn't a good way to authenticate a genuine Studebaker wheelbarrow. I don't recall the wheel looking like the one Jon shows from the museum example, but didn't know to look for that. It did have the basic structure as the Museum one, but I think most from that era did.

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  • Sdude
    replied
    When we visited the museum in Placerville, the docent told us the thing to look for were the staggered spokes. He told us the wheelbarrow was authenticated by John M himself when he revisited Placerville. The wheelbarrow has been in the same museum since.

    Look at the wheel up close.

    Click image for larger version

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  • M15 Trucker
    replied
    They don't look anything the same. The Placerville wheelbarrow looks like it was made by a blacksmith with some woodwright skills. The Pittsburg wheelbarrow looks like it was made by a woodwright with no blacksmith skills. Look at the wheels on both, differen spoke arrangement. John M. wheelbarrows were made for prospector, so that they could be assembled and disassembled quickly and be in peaces that could be packed on a mule or burro.

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  • 55coupe
    replied
    The only thing I could do is look at the one in Placerville then drive 2hrs and look at the one for sale and give it my best guess.

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  • 53k
    replied
    Originally posted by 55coupe View Post
    I didn't meen to confuse anyone this Pittsburg is by San Fracisco CA.
    I should have picked that up by the word Antioch (used to live in East Bay). Considering that, it is possible the wheelbarrow could be Studebaker. Comparing the museum picture with the Craigslist picture it does look like the frame, handle bars, and wheel mounting are the same. That would be a very nice item to have.

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  • wolfie
    replied
    Is there any way to tell if this is an actual Studebaker wheelbarrow? Thanks, Steve

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    I have a license plate frame from a Stude dealer in Pittsburgh, Ca.

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  • 55coupe
    replied
    I didn't meen to confuse anyone this Pittsburg is by San Fracisco CA.

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  • 53k
    replied
    Originally posted by 55coupe View Post
    Ok I hope this works. It is not mine. Just saw it on C/L awhile ago I have no idea if it's real. Studebaker
    Wheelbarrow
    $800 (pittsburg / antioch) antiques - by owner
    pic map
    The El Dorado County Museum (Placerville, CA) has an authenticated John M. Studebaker wheelbarrow. There is a small picture of it here- http://museum.edcgov.us/exhibits It does look somewhat similar, but how likely is it that such a wheelbarrow made in Placerville in the mid-19th century would have made it back east?

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  • 55coupe
    started a topic Studebaker wheelbarrow

    Studebaker wheelbarrow

    Ok I hope this works. It is not mine. Just saw it on C/L awhile ago I have no idea if it's real. Studebaker
    Wheelbarrow
    $800 (pittsburg / antioch) antiques - by owner
    pic map
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