Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1960 home design

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1960 home design

    Click image for larger version

Name:	60bhg-2305Studebaker.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	60.0 KB
ID:	1738280

    I enjoy looking at old house plans, and while I know many homes were cataloged for many years, this one appeared in 1960 and hiding in the car port, is a little Starlight....you guys can ID the year....the car and house designs look timeless

  • #2
    I agree cool design, There are a lot of houses in Glendora Ca. near a school I helped to remodel (Glendora High School) Very similar in style.
    Several Times coming and going while checking on my crews I would drive through the area just to look at the amazing homes. Most in this style and some , most you could see through the front door all the way to the back yard.
    Too bad I never spotted a Studebaker in the driveway.

    Dean.

    Comment


    • #3
      Here in Lakeland, the whole neighborhood I'm in was build around 1957-1960. I'm guessing two bedrooms were in style back then.
      Tom - Bradenton, FL

      1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
      1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

      Comment


      • #4
        I am guessing that almost flat roof house was not in Indiana! These were common in the '60's in Calif.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

        Comment


        • #5
          Then you'll love the latest issue of Atomic Ranch; especially pages 50 & 51!!

          http://www.atomic-ranch.com/store/in...products_id=54

          Craig
          Last edited by 8E45E; 03-14-2013, 06:24 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi

            Handsome mid-century, Jet Age Modern, very much of its time, speaks of the boundless optimism of the era. Google "Living Garage" for some background on an idea that never caught on.

            Steve

            Comment


            • #7
              Can we remember the day when all the storage a family of four required was 6x6'?

              Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by showbizkid View Post
                Can we remember the day when all the storage a family of four required was 6x6'?
                And that probably included the reel lawnmower!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Extremely common around here.

                  I've inspected hundreds of them. I call them B52 ramblers 'cuz the low-pitch roofs are about the same pitch of a B52's wings when it's resting on the tarmac. Most of them around here have had the carport converted to living space. It's true, there's not a whole lot of storage space in them.

                  At 40 - 50 years old most of them look like cr** now - even when they're well taken care of. They mostly had built-up gravel-ballasted roofs in the 50's and 60's but most have given away to torch-down modbit and many have now got cheap glass mat replacement roofs. The built-in gutters at the perimeter of the roof usually leak like sieves. Lots of glass and high ceilings and they are energy hogs.

                  A fellow named Joseph Eichler started building post-modern flat-roofed homes with open floor plans and a lot of glass and exposed timbers down in California in the 50's. Lots of folks copied his idea but added the slightly pitched roofs to facilitate roof drainage and raise the ceilings a little bit.

                  Pulled back the living room throw rug in one to reveal a hatch. Climbed down a ladder and found a concrete curved-bottom swimming pool converted to a root cellar. A previous owner had apparently gotten bored with his expensive house option and covered it with a floor. Seller had apparently hoped I wouldn't find it; there was nothing about it in the literature for the home or on the listing. The throw rug was so new it still had that textile smell one encounters in carpeting stores. That's the kind of thing that ends up in company-ending lawsuits for a home inspector.

                  I was glad that day I'd snapped down an energy drink halfway through that inspection or I might have missed it.

                  Sorry I hijacked your thread. I shoulda focused on the Stude and not the house.
                  Last edited by hausdok; 03-15-2013, 02:34 PM.
                  Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
                  Kenmore, Washington
                  hausdok@msn.com

                  '58 Packard Hawk
                  '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
                  '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
                  '69 Pontiac Firebird
                  (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A post modern house with a post modern car, cool!
                    There's at least three houses like that near my work. Maybe they're a bit nicer and larger, two are close to each other. Very neat style.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by hausdok View Post
                      Pulled back the living room throw rug in one to reveal a hatch. Climbed down a ladder and found a concrete curved-bottom swimming pool converted to a root cellar. A previous owner had apparently gotten bored with his expensive house option and covered it with a floor.
                      That is one of the craziest things I have ever heard!! Any other good home inspection stories? I bet you have seen a LOT of crazy stuff.
                      sigpic
                      1961 Flamingo Studebaker Hawk

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That house looks very similar to The first house Miss Edie and I bought in Jacksonville Fla. June 1969. Altough the floor plan is completely different. I think it was built circa 1956. It cost us $7200.00 The mortgage payment was $53.17 per mounth. Every house in the neighborhood was built on the plan. Some were turned sideways,some were Mirrow reversed. Some had flat roofs. Ours had the slight pitch.
                        Between the years 1969 and 1977 various Studebakers graced the carport and yard. They include
                        !956 Skyhawk
                        1963 R1 GT Hawk
                        1940 Commander
                        1959 Silverhawk
                        1962 4dr Lark 8
                        1955 Conestoga
                        1955 Comander

                        When the 3rd child was born we added 2 rooms and another bath.
                        When the 4th child was born, we moved to Georgia.
                        Neil Thornton

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          There's a lot of these here in Oceanside, where I live. The area I'm in was built up mostly from '55 - '60, and this particular plan was a pretty common one here, especially the variant that eschewed the carport for more closed-in living space and a simple circular drive.

                          Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The one pictured likely had more than 6x6 storage in the basement.
                            Those stairs can only go down.

                            Dean.


                            Ps. And that is where he stashed all his n.o.s. Studebaker parts
                            Last edited by dean pearson; 03-14-2013, 09:27 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              As much as I detest these homes they had a virtue that our current tract homes lack, namely modesty. Yes, two-bedroom starter homes were common back in the day. Often these would be mixed in with the three-bedroom models. Four bedrooms were uncommon in the tracts. Back then people were just thankful to have a home, let alone one of the ostentatious monsters being built today.

                              This model reminds me of the Parr's home in The Incredibles. The Parr's stationwagon reminded me strongly of the '57 Packard-Baker.

                              Oh and Dean? What basement? Those were very rare birds in California. Basements still are. One only finds even root cellars in very old homes out here. We don't have the frost issues you folks do back east and the majority of these homes had concrete slabs for floors.

                              Ugly to look at, cheaply built and a nightmare to maintain. You modernists can keep 'em.
                              Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                              K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                              Ron Smith
                              Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X