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1960 home design

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by 1962larksedan View Post
    Re: likes and dislikes in houses, each to their own. Me: I detest smaller Colonials and Cape Cods but love Victorians, Craftsmans as well as mid century ranch (they were called 'ramblers' in the Wash DC area) homes.
    Anyone else remember these? http://www.eurekamodern.com/Pierson%20windows.htm ; http://breuer.syr.edu/xtf/view?docId...;brand=default

    There were entire neighborhoods of 1950's and early 1960's ranch style houses with them, but most have been changed out over the years.

    Craig

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  • 1962larksedan
    replied
    Re: likes and dislikes in houses, each to their own. Me: I detest smaller Colonials and Cape Cods but love Victorians, Craftsmans as well as mid century ranch (they were called 'ramblers' in the Wash DC area) homes.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1962larksedan
    replied
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    I am guessing that almost flat roof house was not in Indiana! These were common in the '60's in Calif.
    Quite a few of that style in Phoenix as well.

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Don't overlook this contemporary house and Studebaker shot which were both designed by the same individual: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...ghlight=cessna

    Craig

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  • Studedude
    replied

    Little boxes on the hillside,
    Little boxes made of ticky tacky,
    Little boxes on the hillside,
    Little boxes all the same.
    There's a green one and a pink one
    And a blue one and a yellow one,
    And they're all made out of ticky tacky
    And they all look just the same.

    And the people in the houses
    All went to the university,
    Where they were put in boxes
    And they came out all the same,
    And there's doctors and lawyers,
    And business executives,
    And they're all made out of ticky tacky
    And they all look just the same.
    And they all play on the golf course
    And drink their martinis dry,
    And they all have pretty children
    And the children go to school,
    And the children go to summer camp
    And then to the university,
    Where they are put in boxes
    And they come out all the same.
    And the boys go into business
    And marry and raise a family
    In boxes made of ticky tacky
    And they all look just the same.
    There's a green one and a pink one
    And a blue one and a yellow one,
    And they're all made out of ticky tacky
    And they all look just the same.

    Catchy tune...
    CAUTION! IT WILL STILL BE IN YOUR HEAD TOMORROW!!

    But... it's worth it!.. click at your own risk, and don't blame me as you sing it tomorrow!:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONEYGU_7EqU



    Last edited by Studedude; 03-15-2013, 05:49 PM.

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  • hausdok
    replied
    What was that song back in the day...Little boxes on the hillside, little boxes all the same.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Studedude
    replied
    A couple of other home/Stude pics posted to face book:



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  • hausdok
    replied
    Originally posted by R_David View Post
    That is one of the craziest things I have ever heard!! Any other good home inspection stories? I bet you have seen a LOT of crazy stuff.
    Oh yeah,

    I've got a zillion of 'em - as does every other home inspector out there. As an example, I'm more afraid of rats than I am of death. I was once inspecting a crawlspace when the earthen floor caved in and I fell into a rat warren. I won't bore everyone here with what developed next; however, when I later wrote about it in my webzine it was, apparently, a hilarioius read for everyone else though it had been a nighmare for me. It ended up being published in ASHI's monthly 'The Reporter.' Now when I show up at conventions, I still get ribbed about it more than a decade later by inspectors I'd never met before, and I still have nightmares about it.

    Before I left home to go in the Army in 1975 my father, myself and my brothers put in lots of foundations. Key to keeping 'em dry is choice of lot so soil tests and studying local hydrological maps is key before you start. Proper use of rebar, properly sized footings, keep them crack free and properly detailing the outside of the walls keeps them dry. If one knows there's a chance the lot is going to be wet a lot, instead of 3,000 psi concrete use 5,000psi concrete because it's considered waterproof. There really is no excuse for a wet basement; the cause can always be laid firmly at the feet of whoever placed it having skipped a step or used cheap materials or neglected to have soil tests done or some other stupid choice. Even here in damp central. I don't see a lot of basements here but the ones that are done right work fine in our wet climate - even when placed close to lakes or rivers - the ones that aren't done right, well, those are cr** and when one questions the water intrusion one hears from the builder, "It's impossible to build a dry basement," which is a crock.

    A crawlspace is nothing more than a really shallow basement with a dirt floor, tiny grated windows (vents) and a whole lot of aggravation involved in checking them out. Some are nice and dry and easy to get through. Some even have concrete floors and the owners have been nice enough to supply a mechanics creeper to get around in them - others are nasty, dirty, smelly, damp pains in the you-know-what. Every time I do one of those I tell myself I really need to find a new line of work. Then I go out and do it all over again. Sigh.

    Sorry for the thread drift. Want to read some crazy home inspector stories? Visit the forums at The Inspector's Journal and glance through the archives. You won't be disappointed.

    I now return you to your regularly-scheduled Studebaker fare.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott
    replied
    OK. Let's just say that where a basement is feasible but isn't part of the deal it's less than a house (to me). Where I live now there are so many homes that were built on the cheap with no basements (west coast) even though they could have been done. And of those that have garages, there is so little room in the structure for storage because of no basements, very often the garage has been converted into a bedroom or filled with stuff so that they can't be used for cars. I live in a pretty nice house, but no basement and I sorely miss it
    Last edited by Scott; 03-15-2013, 02:22 PM.

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  • mr moto
    replied
    That house design is similar to our 1962 vintage 3 bedroom home just not as attractive (IMHO) or spacious. We love ours, of course.
    Anyway, in Louisiana basements are known as indoor fish ponds. Few people would even consider having one! It's impossible to keep moisture out.

    Leave a comment:


  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by Scott View Post
    I agree. They only look good on paper - barely. A house without a basement and garage is not a home. It's a monument to greedy developers and gullible buyers.
    There are areas where one does NOT want a basement, which would include coastal areas, lake-front properties, and where there's a high water table. My 'house of choice' design is a bi-level confuguration where the basement is not like a dungeon with 3-4 foot tall windows, and the inherent layout with the upper & lower stairs next to each other permit a nice, spacious double-door entryway.

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott
    replied
    Originally posted by studeclunker View Post
    As much as I detest these homes they had a virtue that our current tract homes lack, namely modesty. Yes, two-bedroom starter homes were common back in the day. Often these would be mixed in with the three-bedroom models. Four bedrooms were uncommon in the tracts. Back then people were just thankful to have a home, let alone one of the ostentatious monsters being built today.

    This model reminds me of the Parr's home in The Incredibles. The Parr's stationwagon reminded me strongly of the '57 Packard-Baker.

    Oh and Dean? What basement? Those were very rare birds in California. Basements still are. One only finds even root cellars in very old homes out here. We don't have the frost issues you folks do back east and the majority of these homes had concrete slabs for floors.

    Ugly to look at, cheaply built and a nightmare to maintain. You modernists can keep 'em.

    I agree. They only look good on paper - barely. A house without a basement and garage is not a home. It's a monument to greedy developers and gullible buyers.

    Leave a comment:


  • bezhawk
    replied
    Originally posted by dean pearson View Post
    The one pictured likely had more than 6x6 storage in the basement.
    Those stairs can only go down.


    Ps. And that is where he stashed all his n.o.s. Studebaker parts


    Then, how does one get out??????

    Leave a comment:


  • studeclunker
    replied
    As much as I detest these homes they had a virtue that our current tract homes lack, namely modesty. Yes, two-bedroom starter homes were common back in the day. Often these would be mixed in with the three-bedroom models. Four bedrooms were uncommon in the tracts. Back then people were just thankful to have a home, let alone one of the ostentatious monsters being built today.

    This model reminds me of the Parr's home in The Incredibles. The Parr's stationwagon reminded me strongly of the '57 Packard-Baker.

    Oh and Dean? What basement? Those were very rare birds in California. Basements still are. One only finds even root cellars in very old homes out here. We don't have the frost issues you folks do back east and the majority of these homes had concrete slabs for floors.

    Ugly to look at, cheaply built and a nightmare to maintain. You modernists can keep 'em.

    Leave a comment:


  • dean pearson
    replied
    The one pictured likely had more than 6x6 storage in the basement.
    Those stairs can only go down.

    Dean.


    Ps. And that is where he stashed all his n.o.s. Studebaker parts
    Last edited by dean pearson; 03-14-2013, 09:27 PM.

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