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From the archives #112 (Bus and locomotive - pre WWII)

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  • From the archives #112 (Bus and locomotive - pre WWII)

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    Any guess as to the year and what sales fetaure was being advertised in this original Studebaker photo? Any other observations?
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  • #2
    Year 1936 hillholder

    studedick from the lower Ozarks

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    • #3
      Agree with Dick! That photo was in TW several years ago with a caption stating that it was demonstrating the Hill Holder.

      Craig

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
        [ATTACH=CONFIG]21315[/ATTACH]

        Any guess as to the year and what sales fetaure was being advertised in this original Studebaker photo? Any other observations?
        Let me guess, Dick; that's you in the fourth row with your left arm around Betty Lou Frumpenstiener, about the shield her from the lung-searing horrors of black smoke about to envelope the bus. Such altruistic chivalry. BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
          Let me guess, Dick; that's you in the fourth row with your left arm around Betty Lou Frumpenstiener, about the shield her from the lung-searing horrors of black smoke about to envelope the bus. Such altruistic chivalry. BP
          Wrong again. I was driving the bus!

          Within a minute or less after that train had passed all the kids on that bus would have looked like the old black face minstrels. My brother father and I had just such an experience in Peoria, Illinois in c1953.

          Yes, I believe I did run the photo in a few different magazines as it applied to the new Hill Holder introduced in the Fall of 1935 on the '36 line of cars and trucks. Another Studebaker FIRST!
          Richard Quinn
          Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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          • #6
            Then who is driving the COE in the post for 1937 COE's brochure that shows the same place and train ? I think the Twilight Zone may be working here, ha !

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            • #7
              All I could tell about the picture was that it was a 1936 school bus. I could tell by the bars on the grill. I would love to have that bus today.

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              • #8
                The President of a former chapter I belonged to had a similar era bus. His plan was to take a Dodge 1 ton chassis with Cummins and replace the Studebaker frame/power train. Then he would redo the inside and make it an International Meet cruiser.

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                • #9
                  All those kids are 80+years old now or dead.
                  101st Airborne Div. 326 Engineers Ft Campbell Ky.

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                  • #10
                    That's a New York Central J Class Hudson pounding toward the grade crossing.
                    Kindest regards,

                    Alan Mende
                    Grantville, PA

                    I'm not a mechanic; I don't even play one on TV.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by alanmende View Post
                      That's a New York Central J Class Hudson pounding toward the grade crossing.
                      Thanks, Alan; I enjoy our forum aviation and train experts filling us in on such details from these general-interest photographs. BP
                      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                      Ayn Rand:
                      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thats also a very well maintained Locomotive , Its almost glossy , It didn't take long for one to get ugly after being rebuilt or new , Ed

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                        • #13
                          Those kids in the picture were lucky. I went to a one room schoolhouse and we had to walk two miles to school -- until the township bought a mule for us to ride. Since we lived on the end of the route, my dad was paid to keep the mule. Things went well until the mule suddenly died from eating too many peanut butter sandwiches. My dad didn't want to give up the monthly mule allowance, so my brother and I had to drag the mule around to pick up the other kids. We got some help from the bigger kids after a few stops and would let the smaller kids ride. It was still tough getting the mule back home after the last stop as we had no help again. After awhile we had to turn the mule over and use the other side, that's when the kids started complaining so the mule allowance ended.
                          (Sorry, I didn't mean to hijack the thread away from busses and trains.)
                          sigpic
                          Lark Parker --Just an innocent possum strolling down life's highway.

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                          • #14
                            The Lark Parker we know and love is back!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
                            sigpic
                            Dave Lester

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                            • #15
                              As a historical foible, at least up until the period where they transitioned to the bigger and better toy diesel-electric locomotives, it was important to keep those locos clean not only for a source of company pride and its reputation, but also as a way to spot potential problems in the steam engine. An individual could not see problems with a steam locomotive, if the water stains in the boiler matched all the other water and coal stains all over the unit. In N&W's fleet, in its steam heyday, this was of major importance on both fronts. To combat the dirtiness, many of the locomotive facilities had wash racks(much like oversized car washes), that the steamers would chuff through at the end of a run, and they'd probably get those while being lubricated, coaled, watered, and inspected.
                              1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                              1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                              1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                              1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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