Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Scam alert

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Scam alert

    I have posted a "wanted 1957 silver hawk front seat ad several places. I got a response which sounded to good to be true. They offered all seats and door panels at a price that was obviously a rip off (way too low). Their sentence structure and wording sounded like a foreigner using English. They included a photo which looked like new seats, door panels and carpet. I did a little research and found the same photo at South East Studebaker. BEWARE THEY ARE OUT THERE!

  • #2
    Yes, I got one also on Sunday from someone calling himself "Christopher Williams." See below:

    I am very much interested in your For Sale ads merchandise advertised on : http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com

    How much will you sell to me last? please write me back here:christopherwilliams677@yahoo.com
    Thanks
    Chris


    Obviously I did not respond. The scummy low-lifes are out there! Excuse me if you are the real
    Christopher Williams!
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

    Comment


    • #3
      If it sounds too good to be true, it is. No "probably" about it. Besides the classic scam of selling parts that don't exist, another one exists that hurts those of us with items for sale. You post an ad online. They offer to buy it. They send you a cashiers check, money order, check, or whatever, for too much money. They ask you if you can send the change back. Problem is, those money orders are not legitimate. They've been stolen, scrubbed of their original info with chemical ink removers, and re-typed with your info. Eventually this comes to the surface, but by then the thief has your parts and your money, and is long gone. You wind up being held liable to pay for the replacement of the entire amount.

      Follow your instincts with this stuff. If the person types like they don't understand English, or offers you more than your asking price, or asks you to wire money to them or mail something overseas, RUN. I used to fight online crime like this. These guys are all scum. If anyone out there wonders if they're being had, feel free to send me a PM, and I can do some digging for you. Some of these guys are good, especially the ones with US accomplices.
      '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

      "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

      Comment


      • #4
        I had a "English" person answer a parts wanted ad I had placed for some parts I needed for a Iver Johnson bicycle.
        Supposed to have the parts in his shop in London, upshot was his English was appalling and the "shop" didn't exist.
        Be careful!
        sigpic1957 Packard Clipper Country Sedan

        "There's nothing stronger than the heart of a volunteer"
        Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle
        "I have a great memory for forgetting things" Number 1 son, Lee Chan

        Comment


        • #5
          Just today (2-12) received this obvious scam email. Maybe I posted my email address here some time ago. Talk about "broken English, and a Dr no less?"


          Hello, i am interested in your CAR you have for sale. Do let me know the last price and present condition of it and if you have any recent picture you should send it to me. Hope to read from you. Dr.Steven Pia.
          Richard Quinn
          Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

          Comment


          • #6
            Dick,

            That very same email, to the letter, goes around a LOT in the scam circles. I've seen it a lot. The reason CAR is capitalized is so the scammer can quickly identify the part he needs to edit to match whichever ad or source he is trying to scam. In fact, my own mother-in-law, who operates a goat farm, has on more than one occasion received that letter, ver batim, except for the word GOAT in place of car, and a different name for the sender.

            These guys actually have entire pre-written scripts for every occasion. When you respond to them, they scan through their collection, select the best pre-written reply that fits, change the needed words, and boom.

            It might seem like these couldn't fool anyone, but truly, I've seen phd holders who get suckered into these things. These guys are bad at English, but great at appealing to emotion. If you feel like you're genuinely getting a good deal, most people glaze over the potentially obvious flaws.
            Last edited by JimC; 02-12-2013, 10:35 PM.
            '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

            "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

            Comment


            • #7
              "I had a "English" person answer a parts wanted ad"

              Remember, there was a time when, "the sun never set on the British Empire." The words and the sentence structure may sound "London," but the geographical location could be far, far away perhaps on the other side of the equator.

              Tom
              '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes, I understand Nigeria is a real hot bed of scammers (I think maybe scummers might be a better adjective).
                Richard Quinn
                Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

                Comment

                Working...
                X