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  • #16
    Originally posted by t walgamuth View Post
    I believe it was called a Cotal? It was fairly commonly seen installed on high performance cars in Europe too, i believe.
    As the fellow in the Tucker video says, the system Tucker used was the same as the one in the Cord 810/812. I believe Hudson also used it in the late '40s. This is as close as North American auto makers got to a preselector type of transmission and differed from European systems such as Cotal, Wilson, ENV, Ferlec, etc. in that they were vacuum operated whereas European systems were either hydromechanical or electromagnetic. Cotal transmissions were electromagnetic.

    This is an example of a Wilson hydromechanical transmission. Go to 2:35.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2T9QpUY3v8

    Keeps the driver busy!

    This is a Cotal electromagnetic transmission. Note that the shifter is very similar to the Cord/Tucker unit. Also the car is a Ford Vedette, not Simca.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYcN1hbkF9Q

    Terry

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    • #17
      Originally posted by dictator27 View Post
      As the fellow in the Tucker video says, the system Tucker used was the same as the one in the Cord 810/812. I believe Hudson also used it in the late '40s. This is as close as North American auto makers got to a preselector type of transmission and differed from European systems such as Cotal, Wilson, ENV, Ferlec, etc. in that they were vacuum operated whereas European systems were either hydromechanical or electromagnetic. Cotal transmissions were electromagnetic.

      This is an example of a Wilson hydromechanical transmission. Go to 2:35.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2T9QpUY3v8

      Keeps the driver busy!

      This is a Cotal electromagnetic transmission. Note that the shifter is very similar to the Cord/Tucker unit. Also the car is a Ford Vedette, not Simca.



      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYcN1hbkF9Q

      Terry
      Speaking of Tucker cars, we visited David early last summer. Took a ton of pictures, came home with that video and a book written by one of the employees who made the clay model, etc. If you get a chance before he departs from this earth to see that museum it is double the worth. Unbelievable. He is now in his 80s. He has all the prototype stuff there and seeing it all in person blows you away. We may stop there again this spring as we intend to go to visit my son and family in Virginia after leaving the SB swap meet. We need to do this early this spring as my Mrs. is to get a new hip on the 27th of May which will curtail our travels for a while.

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      • #18
        The system was made by Bendix and initially used by Hudson, then Auburn/Cord as well as others later on.

        It used electrical switches and solenoids to control vacume actuation. To see how it worked for the Cord;

        http://forums.acdclub.org/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=6158

        there you will find a diagram and a link for a demonstration of the system.

        It was (to be frank), a pain in the butt! Vacume leaks were continuos, failed switches common due to arcing and broken wires. To make matters worse for Cord, the wiring diagrams were printed wrong. But when everything was working, they were (and are) a delight to use!

        When you look on the site, you'll notice that 4th gear is on the outside of the H. Initially the system was for a 3 speed transmission but due to the low power output of the Lycoming V8, Auburn used a 4 speed to allow for a lower 1st gear to make the car's performance match or beat the L29's. As it worked out, in town you were most likely to be shifting back and forth between 2nd and 3rd anyway.

        Cheers,

        Ken

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