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Camera Oddity: Jan 2013 Turning Wheels cover

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  • Camera Oddity: Jan 2013 Turning Wheels cover

    Did anyone else notice the slight oddity provided by the camera lens on the front cover of the January 2013 Turning Wheels?

    Take a look: Virtually all the Studebakers lined up are C/K bodies, so we know the angle of the windshield lay-back, for want of a better term, is identical on all the C/K cars.

    But ever so slightly, as the cars get further away from the camera, the windshields appear to be a little more upright than on the cars closest to the camera. That distortion is entirely the camera lens' curvature, of course, but I thought interesting nonetheless. BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    Wow Bob. You have a sharp eye. I never would have noticed that. Nice photo though.
    Rog
    '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
    Smithtown,NY
    Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

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    • #3
      That's not an oddity at all, Bob. Things really do change shape depending upon where you are standing, such as, things do get smaller as you get farther away from them. If I were to walk away from you with a yardstick, the yardstick and I would grow smaller until I was no longer a disturbance to your space (and you would probably like that a lot). The things I measure with the yardstick on the way would still appear reasonably sized to me.
      This has led to the theory that we live on the inside surface of the earth. Th sun, moon and universe are located closer to the center of the earth and appear incredibly small from where we observe.
      As an engineer, you may prefer things to remain a constant size, and that's OK, there are just some times that you need to think outside the decahedron to understand them. The Turning Wheels cover may be a good example.
      sigpic
      Lark Parker --Just an innocent possum strolling down life's highway.

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      • #4
        Geez, and all along I've thought the TW cover was wrecktangular in planform (viewed straight on, of course). So - where would I have to stand to appear thinner? Some distance from the Fridge???
        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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        • #5
          Good one Bob, (Roscoe) (Biggs) !
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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          • #6
            I am so relieved to read this, Bob and others. I thought my eyes were just so old and tired, that as they looked farther away, with age and failing distance sight, that things just naturally appeared to sag or lean , Ha !!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Lark Parker View Post
              That's not an oddity at all, Bob. Things really do change shape depending upon where you are standing, such as, things do get smaller as you get farther away from them. If I were to walk away from you with a yardstick, the yardstick and I would grow smaller until I was no longer a disturbance to your space (and you would probably like that a lot). The things I measure with the yardstick on the way would still appear reasonably sized to me.
              This has led to the theory that we live on the inside surface of the earth. Th sun, moon and universe are located closer to the center of the earth and appear incredibly small from where we observe.
              As an engineer, you may prefer things to remain a constant size, and that's OK, there are just some times that you need to think outside the decahedron to understand them. The Turning Wheels cover may be a good example.
              To: Lark Parker,-----I like to think outside the room that the decahedron is kept in!!

              Comment


              • #8
                I just thought that the picture was "scrunched-in" a bit to get it all on the page. I think my cheap digital camera distorts pictures. I have never been able to capture an accurate picture of those wonderful oval headlights on a '32 Studebaker. Somehow, it stretches the image just enough to make them look round.

                Just think of how angry it makes the women in my family...makes them look round too!

                I need to get one of them "scrunch" cameras.
                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                SDC member since 1975

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                • #9
                  Bob,
                  Don't you have ANYTHING to do 'cept stare at TW?????

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Deaf Mute View Post
                    Bob, don't you have ANYTHING to do 'cept stare at TW?????
                    I figgered somebody would say that as soon as I posted that observation, Duane! BP
                    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                    Ayn Rand:
                    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Lark Parker View Post
                      As an engineer, you may prefer things to remain a constant size, and that's OK, there are just some times that you need to think outside the decahedron to understand them. The Turning Wheels cover may be a good example.
                      Mr Parker, I try very hard not to get caught in a decahedron from which I must think outside of. Very good to see you posting, btw.
                      Jim
                      Often in error, never in doubt
                      http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

                      ____1966 Avanti II RQA 0088_______________1963 Avanti R2 63R3152____________http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

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                      • #12
                        I hate camera oddities. This statue is suppose to be vertical. It's in Davenport, Iowa by the muddy mississippi. It's a tribute to Mr Dillion and his "home rule" theory.

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