Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question about Hawk Floor Board Cut Out

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Question about Hawk Floor Board Cut Out

    I have a chance to buy a 56 power hawk which has been in storage for 20 years with the drive train and a lot of parts removed for a restoration. Sometime previously to the current owner buying it, someone had cut the transmission hump out so they could pull the automatic trans from the top. (this is the first time I have seen this process). A friend expressed concerns on the integrity of the body after this was done. They did not replace the hump, they just put different metal across it. This is a c body coupe. It does have some rust in it but nothing major. His concern got me thinking as I had not thought about body integrity with the hump being cut out. The more I think about it the more concerned I get. This car is not worth a lot of hours of work rebuilding the hump and re-truing the body.

    I am curious what others think. Has anyone else worked with a car with such a modification? Should this become a parts car?

    I might add that the interior and body need rework already. The engine is in the process of being rebuilt, ie it is rebored with new pistons and bearings but is in short block form right now.

    Thanks ahead to those that respond.
    Milt

    1947 Champion (owned since 1967)
    1961 Hawk 4-speed
    1967 Avanti
    1961 Lark 2 door
    1988 Avanti Convertible

    Member of SDC since 1973

  • #2
    Don't sweat it.
    Worst thing would be the OE molded carpet might not fit quite right.
    Jeff
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

    Comment


    • #3
      In my humble NOT inexperienced opinion, you should check a thing or two. Check the fit of the doors. A warped body can be determined by how the doors fit. Keep in mind, that doors can sag because of hinge pin wear, but you can check that by moving the doors up and down and looking for play in the hinges. If the doors close and fit as they should, you are probably OK for body integrity. If you plan to take the body off the frame for restoration, you should be able to tack weld some braces in place to maintain body dimensions. Since, as you say, parts are removed for restoration, I probably would be more concerned that I get all the parts.

      There are lots of Studebaker cars and trucks running around with patched floors. It shouldn't be a deal killer. It really depends on your skills, pocketbook, and your comfort level. If you can buy it right...go for it.
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

      Comment


      • #4
        What John said. I would look especially at the door post to floor area, if the two are still well bonded together, and the floor is solidly bolted to a good solid crossmember as it should be, the body integrity should be fine. Just weld in a replacement tunnel from a scrap C or K body.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

        Comment


        • #5
          My dad was a mechanic, and I recall in the 1950s-60s, he had a four legged transmission jack that sat inside the car, straddling the hump. It had a geared spool & cable to attach to the tranny, from top side, to gently lower the tranny down to the floor. Re-installation of the tranny simply reversed the procedure; the car was hoisted back up with the jack. Using that jack required cutting out a major part of the hump, as you describe. After the job, the hump was simply set back into place, with maybe a couple of screws to keep it from shifting. I bet there were many cars in that era with the hump cut out, as described above.

          Comment


          • #6
            Oops, I meant the TRANNY was hoisted back up with the jack.

            Comment


            • #7
              I would think that those "old school" type Jacks were mainly intended for the much smaller and lighter Manual Trannies. I can't see the tunnel being wide enough to get an Automatic out, besides it would have to move back a lot to get the Trans. input shaft clear of the Converter Housing, then it would not move back forward to the hole.

              Maybe their intention in this case was to install a floor shifter to the Automatic the easy way!
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

              Comment


              • #8
                I can provide a replacement floor hump panel. Weld it back in with body on frame, after checking door fit & it should be fine.
                Barry'd in Studes

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                  I would think that those "old school" type Jacks were mainly intended for the much smaller and lighter Manual Trannies. I can't see the tunnel being wide enough to get an Automatic out, besides it would have to move back a lot to get the Trans. input shaft clear of the Converter Housing, then it would not move back forward to the hole.

                  Maybe their intention in this case was to install a floor shifter to the Automatic the easy way!
                  Rich, The jack dropped the tranny DOWN to the floor. Not UP thru the floos into the car.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
                    Rich, The jack dropped the tranny DOWN to the floor. Not UP thru the floos into the car.
                    DOWN to the ground, not UP thru the car floor and into the car. Trust me, I saw my dad use that jack several times.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X