Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Where Did All The Jacks Go?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
    There are pictures of the various jack bases in section 1812 of the 59-64 chassis parts book. Studebaker clearly bought their bumper jacks from different companies at different times, and not all of the parts interchange -- even though they are all fundamentally the same design. The jacks provided with the 59 Larks were already NLA in December 1964, when the jacks page of the 59-64 parts book was revised. The book suggests substituting the 60-63 jack. I have one of those if you want it. The jack shaft has a V shape. I also have a 1547701 base (only) from a 59 jack, but none of the other parts. The hole in the base (and the shaft of the jack) are a Y shape.

    I have
    Thank you very much for these infos, that's really helpful!!! I'll have to get one of these chassis parts book, that's on my Christmas list!
    So it seems like the jack that was in the car's trunk could be the factory one, it is Y-shaped but there's nothing written on it, no brand name, no part number or anything.

    I'd gladly but you your 1959 jack base, you've got a PM.

    Comment


    • Most of the old jacks lead a nomadic life... at the salvage yard shoppers would borrow a GM jack to lift up their Mustang, then someone would borrow that one and prop up their Rambler, and after a few years the jacks were all mixed up beyond all recognition. Most were tortured by people in a hurry and destroyed.

      Jacks over the decades can sorta be compared to hair styles, as they change each era has it's similarities. Thunderations... your 1950 pictured jack is (sorry to say) a mid 1960's jack, it might be worth money if it's a muscle car jack, cant tell from the photo. The early 50's style is a different style jack.

      Corvair jacks are pretty sturdy, but are visually different than the Avanti jack. The Avanti jack pictured I've seen being touted as an original... I've NEVER seen this jack in person or on sale anywhere. There's someone on ePay who is selling lots of NOS Avanti Jacks, I've asked for clairification but they do not return my requests. The ones on ePay are very very similar to some generic jacks sold as aftermarket in the 60's.

      When I see piles of jacks on the cheep... I try my best to scoop them up. Photo from earlier this year probably my best ever hunt.

      Laugh Hard, Hand Tough, Lend a Hand
      Ramblin Randy

      Comment


      • Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
        Studebaker bumper jacks are only good for being "correct" in the trunk, damaging bumpers, and dangerously attempting to raise the car off the ground. I still have a scar on my left knee from where a bumper jack "got me" when I was 16 years old and it slipped out from under a 56J bumper. I only use bottle jacks or scissor jacks, but also understand being "correct" is important to some folks; I just hope nobody actually tries to use them.
        My 59 Lark Hardtop came with it's jack pack. I lubed it and ran it up and back down and put it back in it's place. I carry a small trolley jack for safely jacking the car in the event of a flat.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Wowabunga View Post
          When I see piles of jacks on the cheep... I try my best to scoop them up. Photo from earlier this year probably my best ever hunt.

          Those ACME thread geared screw jacks are some of the strongest and best ever built. Also, since the design goes all the way back to the early twentieth century, some of the oldest. I have one that my Father-in-Law gave me. He said he salvaged it from an old T-Model Fire truck his Department scrapped back in the 1950's. I bought another a couple of years ago at a flea market for five bucks.

          Yesterday, I was working in my man-cave and needed to move a vice stand made from angle iron. The four legs of the stand were hammered a couple of feet into the ground. My first attempt to move it was by using a 1960 Studebaker Lark bumper jack. After about three clicks of the bumper jack handle, it felt as though one more gut busting push on the tire iron jack handle, and the jack would be destroyed. Instead, I grabbed one of the old screw jacks. Without much effort at all, as the little ratchet mechanism "clinked" away, the screw jack lifted the four legs evenly out of the ground.

          I don't consider myself a jack "collector," but I always snap up any that I think I could have a use for. For example, this summer, (at a motorcycle parts swap meet) I bought one of those low profile horizontal jacks to use where clearance is problematic. I'm not sure, but I think those jacks were offered on Ford Fairmonts. For those mechanical "Pick-up" style jacks, I kinda have a limit of offering two bucks. If they have the handle, I might go as high as four bucks.
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

          Comment


          • Originally posted by jclary View Post
            Those ACME thread geared screw jacks are some of the strongest and best ever built.

            I kinda have a limit of offering two bucks. If they have the handle, I might go as high as four bucks.

            I use a 1920's Barrett Jack to take the weight off my pickup truck when I'm hauling 250 gallons of water to irrigate the garden.... easy up and easy down. As to spending money, if I see a really nice 1950's post jack complete I will pull out some cash. At a mountain man estate auction I dug a nice Corvette Sisscors Jack out of the scrap pile for a mere $1 bid.
            Laugh Hard, Hand Tough, Lend a Hand
            Ramblin Randy

            Comment


            • In a conversation with a retired salesman from Universal Jack of Butler, Indiana I learned the following.
              The standard for auto bumper jacks is to be tested 10 times on each corner of the car.
              Studebaker at one point decided that they would not supply bumper jacks and the dealer was to transfer the ones from the old car that was traded in to the new car for the customers.
              The dealers complained and Universal had to make cardboard packaging and send many jacks out to Customers who did not receive bumper jacks. Studebaker quickly changed their minds and made jacks standard equipment again.

              Husband of Lark VIII girl

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Lark8girl View Post
                In a conversation with a retired salesman...........
                Studebaker at one point decided that they would not supply bumper jacks and the dealer was to transfer the ones from the old car that was traded in to the new car for the customers.
                Did they spray the jacks with the "New Car Smell" spray ???
                Laugh Hard, Hand Tough, Lend a Hand
                Ramblin Randy

                Comment


                • Studebakers don't have any jacks left because the trunks rusted out and the jacks fell out on the road. Then the guy from Hershey came along and picked them up and now has corned the market on jacks.

                  Corvair scissors jacks are not like the one pictured earlier, which had the dip in the center of the lifting plate. In fact I haven't seen any scissors jack with a dip in it, so that Studebaker jack should be easy to spot.

                  Every Studebaker I see in the junk yard is always missing the jack, and almost every Studebaker I see for sale is also missing the jack. I bought the aluminum floor jack from Harbor Freight on sale for about $69, and it works great for jacking my 1950 Champion. It only weighs 27 pounds, so it's easy to carry.

                  Comment


                  • I scored a late 60's - early 70's bumper jack from a Ford Galaxie; it must be close to the original, as it fits perfectly in the trunk location, and the base works for holding down the spare...... However, when utilised, it quickly became apparent that the bumper was going skyward whilst the car remained earthbound - those bumper brackets are made of cheese! Thankfully, no permanent damage done. The bumper jack looks good in the trunk, but I now use a bottle jack for the business of wheel removal.

                    Comment


                    • I have a 1965 Daytona...it came to me with no jack in the trunk. I would love to find what the jack looked like and better yet find one to buy to put in the trunk..

                      Comment


                      • There are pictures of at least some of the car jacks in the parts book. The 59-64 book has some pretty good ones.
                        Skip Lackie

                        Comment


                        • Probably went to Jack Heaven, and some may have taken the car/owner with it

                          Comment


                          • My 1957 Packard didn't have a jack either. Must have had one at one time. Saw the damaged it caused...left bumpers bent. Gone but not forgotten!
                            sigpic1957 Packard Clipper Country Sedan

                            "There's nothing stronger than the heart of a volunteer"
                            Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle
                            "I have a great memory for forgetting things" Number 1 son, Lee Chan

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X