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Studebaker and the Memphis Belle

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  • #31
    Whoops! Wrong article. http://www.ar15.com/archive/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=242087
    sigpic
    Claude Chmielewski
    Studeski
    http://www.studeski.com
    Fillmore, Wisconsin
    47 M-16 Truck
    53 2R5
    60 Lark VIII Convertible
    60 5E7 Champ pickup
    62 GT Hawk 4 speed
    63 Lark
    63 GT Hawk R2 4 speed
    64 Commander Wagonaire
    64 Daytona Convertible
    50 Champion Regal (parts car)
    36 Dictator
    36 Dictator in pieces

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    • #32
      Studeski...

      It was the Liberty Belle that was destroyed. The Aluminum Overcast is alive and well and living in Oshkosh.


      And if you'll allow me to make a recommendation for all B-17 fans out there,
      your need to buy The Final Cut, a history of all the surviving B-17s. If you've ever flown on a B-17 (in recent years), it's in there.
      http://www.aerovintage.com/final.htm

      The Fourth Edition even has photos taken by myself of B-17s when they were still in use as fire bombers in the late 1970s.

      Here's a breakdown of surviving Flying Fortresses....
      http://www.aerovintage.com/b17loc.htm
      Last edited by JBOYLE; 01-03-2013, 01:57 PM.
      63 Avanti R1 2788
      1914 Stutz Bearcat
      (George Barris replica)

      Washington State

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      • #33
        I've spent over three hours flying in the Collings Foundation's "909". Highly recommended if you like vintage machinery. Flying in the plexiglass nose is a thrill and taking pics out of the dorsal hatch makes for some amazing photography, just make sure you have a strong leash on your camera! Here's a photo of a Wright R-1820 at the Dayton Ohio Air Force Air Museum: (IIRC, it is a Studebaker, but I can't quite see the tag)

        Click image for larger version

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        • #34
          During WWII, My Dad flew on B24s (PB4Y1) in the Pacific for the US Navy. He took photographs of Japanese positions, manned the 50 cal. on the side (he was too tall for the ball turret), and maintained the aircraft (AMM2). So he and his crew did indeed fix their own plane.
          Bish
          sigpic"Somewhere West of Newport Center"
          1956 2E12 O/D SOLD!
          1959 4E2 4spd, TT
          1963 8E28 GSA order
          1963 8E5 SOLD!
          1963 Lark Daytona Wagonaire 289,O/D, TT

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          • #35
            There is a B-17 undergoing restoration at the air museum in Palm Springs, California (it's almost done). All four engines and the spare are Studebakers! Sorry, I don't remember what it's name was.
            Attached Files
            Scott Rodgers
            Los Angeles
            SDC Member since 1989
            \'60 Lark HT
            \'63 Wagonaire
            \'66 Frankenbaker

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            • #36
              Originally posted by JBOYLE View Post
              Studeski...

              It was the Liberty Belle that was destroyed. The Aluminum Overcast is alive and well and living in Oshkosh.


              And if you'll allow me to make a recommendation for all B-17 fans out there,
              your need to buy The Final Cut, a history of all the surviving B-17s. If you've ever flown on a B-17 (in recent years), it's in there.
              http://www.aerovintage.com/final.htm

              The Fourth Edition even has photos taken by myself of B-17s when they were still in use as fire bombers in the late 1970s.

              Here's a breakdown of surviving Flying Fortresses....
              http://www.aerovintage.com/b17loc.htm
              Scott,
              Thanks. That's only an hour away!
              sigpic
              Claude Chmielewski
              Studeski
              http://www.studeski.com
              Fillmore, Wisconsin
              47 M-16 Truck
              53 2R5
              60 Lark VIII Convertible
              60 5E7 Champ pickup
              62 GT Hawk 4 speed
              63 Lark
              63 GT Hawk R2 4 speed
              64 Commander Wagonaire
              64 Daytona Convertible
              50 Champion Regal (parts car)
              36 Dictator
              36 Dictator in pieces

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by scott.rodgers View Post
                There is a B-17 undergoing restoration at the air museum in Palm Springs, California (it's almost done). All four engines and the spare are Studebakers! Sorry, I don't remember what it's name was.

                Miss Angela
                63 Avanti R1 2788
                1914 Stutz Bearcat
                (George Barris replica)

                Washington State

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Bish View Post
                  During WWII, My Dad flew on B24s (PB4Y1) in the Pacific for the US Navy. He took photographs of Japanese positions, manned the 50 cal. on the side (he was too tall for the ball turret), and maintained the aircraft (AMM2). So he and his crew did indeed fix their own plane.
                  Bish

                  That was not the case in the USAAF and the Eighth Air Force.
                  There was a non-flying Crew Chief who was responsible for the aircraft (with a few helpers), for specialized work, there were specialists on the base that would work on particular systems. The crew chief would have overseen engine swaps, but I really doubt if 8th AF flight crews did much of the "dirty work"...but the gunners did have to clean and maintain their weapons.

                  What I don't know is how much engine work would have been done on the base. There were specialized depots for heavy engine maintenance and overhauls. I believe work at the base may have been limited to replacing cylinders, superchargers and carb work.

                  I've read a WWII biography of a B-17* co-pilot where he discusses al the work to change and break-in a new engine. There was a lot to it...each engine had to be carefully "broken in".

                  *the excellent Serenade to the Big Bird, by Bert Stiles. Bert was a college student and published author when he joined the USAAF. After completing a tour in B-17s he volunteered to remain in combat and fly P-51 Mustangs. He was killed on Nov, 26 1944 while shooting down a german fighter. He was just 24 years old. His book was published in 1947 to wide acclaim. If you go to the National Museum of the US Air Force at Wright Patterson,AFB, Ohio and look at their B-17, Shoo, Shoo Baby, please remember him. He flew as co-pilot in that aircraft for a couple of combat missions.
                  Last edited by JBOYLE; 01-04-2013, 06:49 AM.
                  63 Avanti R1 2788
                  1914 Stutz Bearcat
                  (George Barris replica)

                  Washington State

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    As John says, the Fort that was burnt-out after a forced landing was Don Brooks' "Liberty Belle"; Mr Brooks also has the very substantial wreck of a second B-17, recovered from Dyke Lake in Labrador a few years ago, and not long ago it was announced that the Liberty group intends to rebuild not just the Dyke Lake Fort but also "Liberty Belle" herself (using a replacement fuselage).

                    The EAA's "Aluminum Overcast" also suffered a mishap a few years back, her place in EAA's touring program being taken by Gen. William Lyons' Fort "Fuddy Duddy" that once belonged to the National Warplane Museum at Geneseo NY. Both those Forts are now flying again.

                    S.

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