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  • Why not in a Studebaker V8?

    'Spent the day winterizing all the collector cars, which includes a run of 10-20 miles to be put away hot after fresh gas and Sta-Bil have been added, and the cooling systems serviced.

    But the 1971 Barracuda convertible's 318 V8 just up and had a major (but not terminal) engine failure that required it being towed about 2 miles back home.

    This would not have happened in a Studebaker V8.

    What was it? BP
    Last edited by BobPalma; 11-27-2012, 01:21 PM.
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    Fuel pump?
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

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    • #3
      Timing chain!
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

      Comment


      • #4
        Stretched timing chain.

        Craig

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        • #5
          BINGO! 'Didn't figure that question would last very long with this erudite group.

          I had just driven 23 miles north of us to fill the car with guaranteed no-alcohol, 100% USA crude, 91-octane gasoline at the Farm Bureau Co-Op in Lebanon IN and was on my way back. On the outskirts of Brownsburg, a mail truck stopped in front of me to make a delivery I wasn't expecting and I hit the brakes fairly hard, although there was never a danger of a collision or anything.

          The engine died when I braked and would not restart. In fact, it cranked 'way too fast and sounded odd at cranking speed. I put 2+2 together and figured the 53-year-old chain had let go.

          Fortunately, a "car" buddy pulled up right behind me after I had been there maybe 2 minutes, max! He lives nearby, so he went home and got his new Silverado and a good tow strap and pulled me the last two miles home.

          I had told Cari just this morning, "Well, after I get all the cars winterized today, I'll need a project before doing the February Co-Operator after Thanksgiving!"

          How prophetic. BP
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

          Comment


          • #6
            You know you're living right when a rescue is that handy. I still remember having the same problem way back in 1977. I had stopped to look at a Studebaker truck sitting in a man's back yard. I was about 50 miles from home. After having a great conversation with this old country fella...I went to crank my 1971 International Travelall. I had one of those huge powerful 401 CI AMC engines that was the big engine offered for that year model.

            Just like you...I was puzzled for a moment why the engine spun over so easily. The old farmer just grinned and instantly knew the problem. When he saw that I doubted him, he led me to his barn and showed me his AMC station wagon. The V8 in his was not a large as my engine, but built the same. He had the timing cover off was in the process of replacing the chain. This was on a Friday evening. I spent the weekend making a new friend. I helped him finish his car and he gave me encouragement as I tore in to mine. About dark the following Sunday evening...dirty from laying on a dirt floor in his barn...I fired it up and drove home.

            I have had a timing gear to fail on a 259 Lark. I had much rather repair the Studebaker than replace the timing chain on any other make.
            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            SDC member since 1975

            Comment


            • #7
              Why Not in a Studebaker V8?

              Yep; never in a Studebaker V8, but here's the culprit in a 318 MoPar:





              Groan.... BP
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

              Comment


              • #8
                Well if you don't think that can't happen in a Studebaker V8 ....you have a lot to learn !
                Maybe there is no chain but don't let that fool you .....just ask Jim Dowdy next time you see him .
                sigpic

                Home of the Fried Green Tomato

                "IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

                1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

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                • #9
                  I was fascinated to see that picture. I just bought my first collector car, a '66 Lincoln Continental. They tell you the first thing to do with one of those is replace the nylon timing gear. Mine came out with cracks in the teeth, but no break-offs. I was lucky. I didn't realize Chrysler did that with theirs, too. Thanks!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Bob,

                    Replace that with the after market double roller timing chain and gear set and you'll never see that problem again. Definitely an improvement over stock gears and chain. FYI, there are several manufacturers of those kits...Cloyes, Comp Cams, and even Summit has their own set for $25.95. (catalog date 2010...price may be a little higher now) But always remember, you get what you pay for..!! It would STILL be better than the OEM set.

                    Dan Miller
                    Auburn, GA
                    Last edited by ROADRACELARK; 11-27-2012, 02:55 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A long time ago I bought a '61 Lark convertible very cheap ($195). The owner said it died in his driveway and wouldn't start. I guessed that it was the timing gear and when I cranked it I was positive. Took me a couple hours and had it running again (in my driveway).
                      Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                      '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Bob
                        Sorry to hear about your troubles.
                        How many miles did the engine have?
                        I've changed the timeing belts on imports at 80,000 miles, but have never really thought about it on cars with good old-fashined chains.
                        Do they have a life limit too?
                        63 Avanti R1 2788
                        1914 Stutz Bearcat
                        (George Barris replica)

                        Washington State

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hey Bob are you going with the stock timing chain set ?
                          Joseph Kastellec

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            'Going with a stock set.

                            The real problem, of course, is these aluminum OEM sprockets with nylon teeth shrunk on top. This was done entirely to make the chain set quiet; to reduce engine operating noise.

                            The stock replacement sets are all metal; USA-made cast sprockets and standard chain; no nylon teeth covers. There's no reason to go crazy with a high-performance chain; I'll probbaly drive this car fewer than 10,000 miles in the rest of my life. Without the nylon shrunk over the top of the sprocket gears, it will never need to again be replaced in my lifetime.

                            The odometer reads 73,264 today and was showing 68,000 and change when I bought it in December 1976. But I bought it from a "curbstoner" and have reason to believe the miles were hit before I bought it. (Of course, I immediately turned in the title I got and all paperwork and got a fresh title in my and my wife's name; the first collector car I bought after we were married July 31, 1976!)

                            Remember, the federal odometer law didn't go into effect until circa 1978, IIRC. There was no place to declare odometer reading and brand (actual or not actual) on the title I received, nor is there on the "new" 1976-issue title generated in our name that we still have, of course.

                            So the engine could well have 100,000 miles on it, although it runs wonderfully...or did until Saturday, November 17, 2012! At this point, age has as much to do with the nylon teeth covering disintegrating as much as does mileage. After all, that sprocket is 41 years old! BP
                            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                            Ayn Rand:
                            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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