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Studebakers in your state as of July 1, 1961?

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  • Studebakers in your state as of July 1, 1961?

    Woo-hoo! I just found my huge, long-lost 1962 Automotive News Almanac! This is the best news for a long time; I treasure this thing for the myriad of information in it and would have referenced it many times during the two years since I'd last seen it.

    Anyway, here's the type of information in this tome that we can have fun analyzing.

    As of July 1, 1961, there were 1,103,612 Studebaker passenger cars registered in The United States; all model years total. Here's how it broke down by state:

    Alabama: 15,964
    Alaska: 1,181
    Arizona: 10,611
    Arkansas: 7,327

    California: 148,479
    Colorado: 13,087
    Connecticut: 18,297

    Delaware: 2,575
    D.C. 3,727 (!)

    Florida: 34,631
    Georgia: 18,414
    Hawaii: 3,185

    Idaho: 7,415
    Illinois: 60,206
    Indiana: 53,755
    Iowa: 20,283

    Kansas: 16,514
    Kentucky: 12,812
    Louisiana: 14,595

    Maine: 5,777
    Maryland: 15,128
    Massachusetts: 24,358
    Michigan: 33,162

    Minnesota: 28,450
    Mississippi: 8,812
    Missouri: 23,049
    Montana: 6,288

    Nebraska: 10,561
    Nevada: 3,433
    New Hampshire: 4,250
    New Jersey: 38,070

    New Mexico: 6,137
    New York: 71,146
    North Carolina: 20,282
    North Dakota: 4,021

    Ohio: 53,667
    Oklahoma: 13,769
    Oregon: 18,145

    Pennsylvania: 67,193
    Rhode Island: 4,765
    South Carolina: 10,717
    South Dakota: 5,126

    Tennessee: 16,044
    Texas: 54,247
    Utah: 6,057

    Vermont: 2,242
    Virginia: 18,090

    Washington: 30,451
    West Virginia: 9,169
    Wisconsin: 25,659
    Wyoming: 2,289

    Thoughts? BP

    Last edited by BobPalma; 11-16-2012, 08:46 PM. Reason: Corrected year to 1961, not 1960!
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    Interesting statistic Bob. I owned one of those in Nebraska at that point in time. Adopted three more in the ensuing three years. I wonder how many there actually were since this figure likely would not have included the ones sitting on used car lots, or would it?
    Frank van Doorn
    Omaha, Ne.
    1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
    1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
    1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

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    • #3
      I had one of the one's in Alabama in 1961. A 53 Champion Starlight coupe.
      Last edited by Flashback; 11-17-2012, 07:43 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Great info Bob... now can you find the same for 1953?

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        • #5
          Impressive numbers for California! I wonder what percentage of them were built there?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Deaf Mute View Post
            Great info Bob... now can you find the same for 1953?
            No, Duane; the information is not available in that format.

            However, I can tell you that of the 20,283 Studebakers registered in Iowa as of July 1, 1961, 1,855 of them were 1953 models. BP
            Last edited by BobPalma; 11-16-2012, 08:52 PM. Reason: spelling
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 41 Frank View Post
              Interesting statistic Bob. I owned one of those in Nebraska at that point in time. Adopted three more in the ensuing three years. I wonder how many there actually were since this figure likely would not have included the ones sitting on used car lots, or would it?
              'Probably not, Frank. I believe this chart actually reflects those for which someone had bought a license plate, because the data distinctly says cars registered by make. BP
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

              Comment


              • #8
                CA, NY, PA, IL, IN in that order. I wonder how they rank today.
                "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Bob,

                  I have a few issues of the annual Automotive News Almanac myself. I have 1950, 58, 59, 60, 61, 63, & 67. In addition to the statistics they are also great for the dealer ads. These things are packed with amazing (and, I might add, at this point, quite useless!) information. For example, from the 1950 version, did you know that state of Indiana farm vehicles consumed 41,294,292 quarts of oil? Or in 1949, Studebaker had 4.46% of the car market, but 5.61% of the truck market. Now, go out and amaze your friends at your next cocktail party with that fact!

                  I should ad I may be the only nut who has boxloads of the weekly editions of Automotive News. I have hundreds of issues, ranging from the late '50s to the late '60s. Really need to start getting rid of some of this junk....
                  Eric DeRosa

                  \'49 2R-5 (original Survivor)
                  \'63 R2 Lark (the money-pit-mobile)
                  \'60 Lark Convertible (project in waiting)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
                    CA, NY, PA, IL, IN in that order. I wonder how they rank today.
                    'Would be interesting to know, Brad. it would probably still be close, although Texas might creep in.

                    The sampling would have to be altered, though, because the cited 1961 data is only for passenger cars. Few trucks were being used as passenger cars back then.

                    Today, a state such as Texas has so many trucks being used as passenger cars that data excluding trucks, SUVs, etc., would not be an accurate report of a manufacturer's market penetration. BP
                    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                    Ayn Rand:
                    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 2R2 View Post
                      Bob,

                      I have a few issues of the annual Automotive News Almanac myself. I have 1950, 58, 59, 60, 61, 63, & 67. In addition to the statistics they are also great for the dealer ads. These things are packed with amazing (and, I might add, at this point, quite useless!) information. For example, from the 1950 version, did you know that state of Indiana farm vehicles consumed 41,294,292 quarts of oil? Or in 1949, Studebaker had 4.46% of the car market, but 5.61% of the truck market. Now, go out and amaze your friends at your next cocktail party with that fact!

                      I should add I may be the only nut who has boxloads of the weekly editions of Automotive News. I have hundreds of issues, ranging from the late '50s to the late '60s. Really need to start getting rid of some of this junk....
                      Well if you do, Eric, call me first. I would love to have more years of Automotive News Almanacs. They will be especially useful for preparing my Hemmings Classic Car columns in years to come, so keep me in mind. Thanks. BP
                      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                      Ayn Rand:
                      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
                        CA, NY, PA, IL, IN in that order. I wonder how they rank today.
                        I'm from PA and it always seemed to me that there were a lot of Studes in PA, then and now. The only way I became aware of Studes was the good number of them in our little town in the '60's, and of course our long-tenured small dealer. No one in my family had them and my Dad did not speak appreciatively of them!

                        An employee of our local Stude dealer (not the owner) said to me once that he remembers their "Zone Guy" coming in and telling them their market penetration in our area was greater than Studebaker's national market penetration. But then, I always thought of Studebaker as a rural or small town kind of product, more than big city. Of course, I could be wrong.
                        Bill Pressler
                        Kent, OH
                        (formerly Greenville, PA)
                        Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
                        Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
                        1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
                        1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
                        All are in Australia now

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 2R2 View Post
                          >>>I should ad I may be the only nut who has boxloads of the weekly editions of Automotive News. I have hundreds of issues, ranging from the late '50s to the late '60s. Really need to start getting rid of some of this junk....
                          just a thought ...

                          IF ...you feel like "donating"...contact Andrew Beckman at the Studebaker National Museum to see if they need to fill any gaps in their Automotive News collection first. That way the info your AN collection contains could be made available to all of us now ...and to others well into the furture!

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                          • #14
                            I find the Indiana number interesting.....must mean the Big 3 had deep interests there.....do I hear conspiracy ?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jackb View Post
                              I find the Indiana number interesting.....must mean the Big 3 had deep interests there.....do I hear conspiracy ?
                              Yes and no, Jack. I know you're kidding about the conspiracies, but The Big Three have always had a huge presence in Indiana.

                              Truth be known, they probably employed more Hoosiers than Studebaker through the years, even when Studebaker was at peak production and employment. It's just that they didn't have any final assembly plants here (at least postwar; I'd have to research pre-WWII) until General Motors opened the huge, all-new Truck Assembly facility in Roanoke IN long after Studebaker was gone. (SW of Ft. Wayne, so it is known as "Ft. Wayne Assembly.")

                              We tend to equate final assembly with a company's presence and, of course, all of Studebaker's United States final assembly was done here in Indiana after they closed the Vernon (Los Angeles) plant at the end of the 1956 model year.

                              But back in the day, General Motors employed thousands at Delco-Remy in and around Anderson, the large Foundry in Bedford (still going), and Sheet Metal Fabrication in Indianapolis. Ford had Steering Gear and other chassis components in Indianapolis, while Chrysler had Electrical in Indianapolis and still has large transmission manufacturing assembly plants (multiple) in Kokomo.

                              Taken together, I'm sure they employed more than Studebaker did on a given day, or in a given year...but without the drama of finished cars and trucks rolling out the door, they weren't as visible as shiny new Studebakers being loaded on rail cars and transports, fresh off South Bend assembly lines. BP

                              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                              Ayn Rand:
                              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                              Comment

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