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Hurricane Sandy Cars: Restore or not restore?

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  • Hurricane Sandy Cars: Restore or not restore?

    There's an article about the pros and cons of repairing a Sandy-damaged car at ClassicCars.com written by Jeff Peek, a writer for Hagerty's Media Services.
    Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
    Kenmore, Washington
    hausdok@msn.com

    '58 Packard Hawk
    '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
    '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
    '69 Pontiac Firebird
    (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

  • #2
    Interesting article. I have worked on a car that was flooded with fresh water, silt and mud. That was challenge enough. I can only imagine adding the complication of salt water. If there is a silver lining to this, from the car hobby perspective, many of those folks that elect to take the money and move on will be in the market for a replacement classic. That will help the marketplace as far as price goes. And those flooded cars that are "abandoned" may bring some hard to find parts to the market place. In any case, caveat emptor are the words of the day. All I can say is I am glad it is not me who has to decide, my sympathy goes out to those who do have to.
    Pat Dilling
    Olivehurst, CA
    Custom '53 Starlight aka STU COOL


    LS1 Engine Swap Journal: http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/jour...ournalid=33611

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    • #3
      I tend to agree with Pat except I would think older owners would most likely take the insurance money and run ....but your correct that there will be some parts most likely.
      Would be interesting to know just how many Studebakers we lost?
      sigpic

      Home of the Fried Green Tomato

      "IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

      1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

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      • #4
        To state the obvious...

        Depends on the car:

        A Model A Ford would take it in stride. Wash, rinse, repeat.
        A Lark less so, but would depend on the model.
        An 80s car isn't worth anything.
        A new car would be toast because of the computers.
        63 Avanti R1 2788
        1914 Stutz Bearcat
        (George Barris replica)

        Washington State

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        • #5
          "A new car would be toast because of the computers"

          Would they? I once dropped my cell phone off a roof into a mud puddle and couldn't come down and get it for nearly half an hour. Rinsed it off with a hose. It didn't work. Took it home, opened it, removed the battery and put it in a charger, dried it out with a blow dryer and then put it in a plastic bag wtih a can of dessicant for a couple of days. Put the battery back in and she's worked as good as new for years. would the salt water speed corrosion that much after it drains away if someone gets to it quickly strips it down and rinses everything off?
          Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
          Kenmore, Washington
          hausdok@msn.com

          '58 Packard Hawk
          '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
          '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
          '69 Pontiac Firebird
          (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

          Comment


          • #6
            For an older collector car, it is saveable, but only worth it if a high dollar car.
            For a late model car, if it was submerged - forget saving it and sell parts. I have seen quite a few wheel/tire packages on CL from the flood areas. I figure that the wheels/tires are okay.
            I have a friend that purchased a car that went for a swim in a swimming pool. It was not in there long before it was pulled out. He ended up changing the computers and much more. Even with used parts and his labor, he lost on the car. Neither of us would attempt it after that.
            Gary L.
            Wappinger, NY

            SDC member since 1968
            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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            • #7
              My attitude toward truly salvage value cars (antique or late model) has always been that I would be willing to pay a penny or two per pound over scrap price and be willing to transport them myself. That is about the only way you can assure yourself a chance at not losing a ton of money.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

              Comment


              • #8
                I dropped my nokia between our ship & one other when we were on the outside, 4,5 meters deep & had to move the ship 1:st by hand as it takes to long to start it up & then get a iron ladder since it was 4 knots stream at that place (a river) but to locate the phone was impossible; the stream & salty water made me almost float away, so I had to go & get a "forgot-what-it's-called,-the-thing-on-a-stick-with-a-net-bag-on" & THEN I finally got it up... took it apart, flushed it in fresh water & dried it for 3 days & it worked fine ever after, like a fairy-tale!
                & yes: the location in the river was near the end so it was salty water.
                (But the one I dropped under the engine in water with oil on top got a problem with the speaker...)
                Anyway, if you're fast enough to flush the salt out of the electronics you wont have problems.

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                • #9
                  This could be an incentive to vote 'SAVE'!! http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...hlight=bugatti

                  Craig

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                  • #10
                    Late model flood cars are totaled by insurance companies. If they could be saved as easily as a wet cell phone,the insurance companies wouldn't put out the money for a total loss.
                    Oglesby,Il.

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                    • #11
                      An appraiser frind of mine looked at a lemon/lime President Speedster that was partly submerged in salt water during 'Katrina'....car was considered total loss, and owner was paid off by insurance co.

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                      • #12
                        A friend (a former Shelby owner) was telling me of a Shelby Mustang that was written off after Katrina. The rear floated because of an empty fuel cell. Someone bought it for a song and it was a fairly easy fix.,..but now the car with a salvage title.
                        A better use for it would be to convert it into a racer for historic racing.


                        Not as easy as a cell phone. Especially after salt water. In addition to the computerrs, remember the wiring, insulation, plastics, switches, seats,airbags and dozens of sensors.....to say nothing of the engine and tranny.
                        Any insurance company would part out a newer car...unless it was a Ferrari Enzo or McLaren F-1.

                        BTW: The Enzo, F-40,F-50 and 288 GTO are the only recent (since 1980) Ferraris to appreciate in value. All other post-Enzo (the man, not the car) Fiat-era Ferraris are just used cars.
                        Don't think just because a car is expensive new that they'll stay valuable.
                        63 Avanti R1 2788
                        1914 Stutz Bearcat
                        (George Barris replica)

                        Washington State

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