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  • New guy seeking "what to look for/avoid" info when considering a 2R pick-up...

    Howdy Folks !

    I'm a life-long old car guy who's always had a fondness for Studebakers, but have not taken the plunge yet.

    I now seem to have a major itch for a 2R pick-up, preferably 1949-53, 2R 10 or 11. My Dad had a '49 2R5 many years ago.

    ( Other South Bend itches include: '41 President, '51 Commander / Land Cruiser / Starlight Coupe, '59-'61 Lark Convertible / HT / Wagon )

    I grew-up with Advance Design Chevys ( '48-'54), and have also owned a '48 International KB-2, and a '61 Willys 4WD pick-up, so I am acquainted with the general concept of pre-1970's trucks ( spartan vehicles made to transport loads, not fast. ).

    That said, what trpouble-spots should I be looking for when considering a given 2 R for possible purchase ?

    My goal is a reliable user truck ( odd jobs around the house, local running within a 25-50 mile radius, no Interstate highways ).

    It needs to look decent (spouse factor), and ideally should not need major bodywork - I'm a good mechanic, but am limited on bodywork skills/ facilities.


    Would appreciate any helpful tips that would prevent "buyer's remorse" !

    Thanks !

    Frank McMullen
    Last edited by 2R Truck Seeker; 10-28-2012, 06:59 AM.

  • #2
    Welcome to the SDC Forum and Studedom Frank! This is a great place to start your search, a lot of great folks here.
    You may also want to check out the Studebaker Truck Talk site at network54.com a site for Stude Truck Nuts. There is also an all Studebaker Swap Meet this coming weekend in Reedsville Pa. and another in late Feb/March in York Pa. I also suggest you check out and join the Studebaker Drivers Club, and their award winning monthly newsletter Turning Wheels.
    Good luck in your search, hope to meet you someday.
    Jim
    I was STUDEBAKER, when STUDEBAKER wasn't "KOOL".

    Comment


    • #3
      Also welcome......main thing with R series is doors and front fender rust, If your mecahnically inclined they are fairly easy to work on and there are alot of mechanical parts out there but some of the body panels are getting very hard ( and pricey) to get.Frames seem to stand the test of time so its really the body to check out the most.
      Good luck
      sigpic

      Home of the Fried Green Tomato

      "IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

      1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

      Comment


      • #4
        As 2R5 said, rust in the fenders, floors, and doors. Virtually all mechanical parts are available. The 2R10 would have the small 161 ci Champion 6, which limits its top speed. The 2R11 would be equipped with the larger 246 ci Commander 6, which does have more horsepower, but doesn't like to rev very high either. The V8 became available in the 3/4-ton model E12 trucks in 1955.
        Skip Lackie

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        • #5
          Rear lower cab corners are a favorite of the tin worms too. IF you're aiming to keep the driveline intact (a great idea to my way of thinking) , make sure you get one with overdrive (big or little 6). You and the truck will be SO MUCH HAPPIER! Strait 3-speed or 4-speed are gonna have you ACHING for one more gear! Trust me.
          No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

          Comment


          • #6
            What to avoid - rust

            What to look for - V8 and overdrive.


            jack vines
            PackardV8

            Comment


            • #7
              More driveable Stude. Trucks

              Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
              What to avoid - rust

              What to look for - V8 and overdrive.
              jack vines
              Jack's suggestion, a very GOOD one by the way, will put you out of your original preference of "R" Series Trucks into 1956 to 1959 1/2 & 3/4 Ton Transtars, and 1960 to 1964 1 Ton and larger Transtars, a very good thing for driveability, power and even MPG if equipped with a 259 or 289 V-8 and Overdrive 3 or 5 Speed.

              These all have the original 1949 "C" Cab, but with many more modern improvements.

              A few are; new grille panel, one piece windshield, larger rear window, sychronized Transmissions, larger steering column, turn signals and shift linkage (if equipped) built into same, 12 Volt System, '60-'64's have full gauges. Late '62-'64's have MUCH improved Brake Systems, and full flow Engine Oil Filters.
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for the replies and suggestions thus far !

                Couple more questions:

                1) R 10 / 11 wheels: I assume that the stock "Budd" wheels are the only thing that will fit the OEM drums ?

                2) Parts avail: what is the availability on things like brake parts for the R10 / R11, eg: Master & Wheel cyls, brake shoes, drums.

                3) Rear-end ratios: I was looking at a '51 R 10 yesterday, and saw that it has what looks like a Timken "split-rear"... what ratios were avail ?

                4) Transmission: do the 3-speed and 4 speed use the same bell-housing? Was there a syncronized 4-speed ?


                Thanks !

                Frank McM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 2R Truck Seeker View Post
                  Thanks for the replies and suggestions thus far !

                  Couple more questions:

                  1) R 10 / 11 wheels: I assume that the stock "Budd" wheels are the only thing that will fit the OEM drums ?

                  2) Parts avail: what is the availability on things like brake parts for the R10 / R11, eg: Master & Wheel cyls, brake shoes, drums.

                  3) Rear-end ratios: I was looking at a '51 R 10 yesterday, and saw that it has what looks like a Timken "split-rear"... what ratios were avail ?

                  4) Transmission: do the 3-speed and 4 speed use the same bell-housing? Was there a syncronized 4-speed ?


                  Thanks !

                  Frank McM.

                  As previously mentioned, the C-cab Studebaker trucks encompass from '49-64. The 2R is only one in the continuum. Some prefer the style of the earlier trucks. Most prefer the engineering and driveability of the later trucks. For me, the '55 V8s are the sweet spot.

                  1. Yes, but that's no real problem. Modern Michelin radial 215/85-16" tires fit these wheels. I powdercoated mine and have been running them for more than thirty years with no problems. Those who try to scare new owners away from the two-piece wheels simply don't understand these aren't "split ring" but one-piece rings. Nothing to worry about.

                  2. Some wheel cylinders from the earlier trucks can be difficult to find.

                  3. The low rear axle ratios which came with most 6-cyls are the reason the four-speed is a problem on the highway. An overdrive is a must if the truck is to be used for highway driving. Most of the Timkens are from 5.12 - 4.88 range. There is a 4.11 gear set, but it is practically unobtanium. I've got one from my '55 E12 four-speed. Even with the 4.11, the V8 was over-revving trying to keep up with 65 MPH freeway traffic.

                  If you can't find a 4.11 Timken, it is possible to swap the Timken brakes and drums over to the later Studeabaker Dana 60 rear axle. I did this to get limited slip and ratios up to 3.55. Not an easy chore, but not the most difficult thing you'll ever do to a C-cab, either.

                  4. No, most of the 3-spd and 4-spds I've seen used different bellhousings.

                  Yes, the B-W T98A is a wonderful heavy duty transmission four-speed synchronized on the top three gears. It's smooth, quiet and shifts beautifully. I really thought about doing the engineering to put an R11 overdrive behind mine, but in the end decided to go with the T89 three-speed overdrive.

                  jack vines
                  Last edited by PackardV8; 10-29-2012, 09:46 AM.
                  PackardV8

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                  • #10
                    Just an addendum to Jack's excellent response. The B-W T98A 4-speed (which was synchronized in gears 2-4) was introduced in the middle of the long 2R-series run, and I think was an extra-cost option for quite a while. The early 2R11s came with either a 3-speed/OD or the non-synchro T9 4-speed. So when searching for a truck, one needs to determine WHICH model 4-speed trans it has. Bottom line: unless you're intending to haul a lot of coal, you're better off with the 3-speed/OD.
                    Skip Lackie

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks Jack and Skip for the recent replies !

                      Is there an easy to tell the Commander 245 six apart from the Champion 169 six, as in by looking at on-line photos ?

                      (Tell-tale manifold characteristics, head shape, water pump, other details ?)

                      Thanks guys !

                      Frank

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 2R Truck Seeker View Post
                        Thanks Jack and Skip for the recent replies !

                        Is there an easy to tell the Commander 245 six apart from the Champion 169 six, as in by looking at on-line photos ?

                        (Tell-tale manifold characteristics, head shape, water pump, other details ?)

                        Thanks guys !

                        Frank
                        Radiator sets into or possibly bumper side of the cradle on the big six and engine side of the cradle on the smaller 6. Steve
                        sigpic

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                        • #13
                          Thanks Steve,

                          Don't have a good photo of Rad cradle itself, and I am unable to copy the photos.\\

                          Rad has a shroud, water pump a long-nosed pulley, exhaust manifold is a "Ram's-Horn", w/o a heat-riser valve under the center, like I've seen on Econo-Miser / Champion engines... also, the head has "sharp" / square corners and long-edges, vs a rounded-edge. Same for transition from top of head to spark-plug wells...

                          Any ID from those details ?

                          Frank

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                          • #14
                            Good to start with good front fenders. No reproductions of those. Rear fenders are available in fibreglass. Other sheetmetal repair parts and patches (including aforementioned cab corners) are available here:

                            http://classicent.com/pickups.php
                            KURTRUK
                            (read it backwards)




                            Nothing is politically right which is morally wrong. -A. Lincoln

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                            • #15
                              Champion six engine serial numbers start with 1R, and Commander six numbers start with 6R. Engine numbers are stamped on a pad on left side, top front corner of block.
                              Skip Lackie

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