Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Studebaker advertising filmstrips

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Studebaker advertising filmstrips

    IMG_6304.jpg IMG_6308.jpg

    I am attaching a few photos showing a part of my collection of Studebaker filmstrips. These are 35mm and in small metal canisters as shown better in image #2. Some of the early ones in the late 1920s are captioned and others have record accompaniment. My collection covers the period from c1928 thru 1956 (perhaps 80-100 with some duplicates). Keep in mind these are NOT movie films but intended for filmstrip projectors that were manually advanced one frame at a time (some of you may remember them from your school days).

    In any event I have a question re scanning these into a computer file. I see on Ebay where there are number of different machines that will handle both 35mm slides and filmstrips. I am wondering if anyone on the forum has had any experience with any particular model that they could recommend. Here is a sample of one that seems to be popular or at least in great quantity:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/3-in-1-Multi...-/350616531727
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  • #2
    A blast from the past...
    Do you have a filmstrip machine?
    Do they use one of those with a built-in record player?

    At school we had some hooked up with cassettes. In 6-7th grade I went to an experimental school where we went at our own pace...so much of the intruction was done via filmstrips. You'd go off in a corner and do a lesson.
    Spent a lot of time working filmstrips.
    63 Avanti R1 2788
    1914 Stutz Bearcat
    (George Barris replica)

    Washington State

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, I have 3 of the original c1936 vintage record player/filmstrip projectors that Studebaker offered to their dealers. Since I taught school I also have at least two newer filmstrip projectors. The issue here is not really one of viewing the filmstrips on a screen but scanning individual frames into digital images.
      Richard Quinn
      Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

      Comment

      Working...
      X