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Studebaker Employee Misplaces Wrench

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by 57pack View Post
    Customer brought back a green Monte back with a thump when he accelerated and a thump when he applied the brakes. Yes, a beer bottle under the back seat!
    My neighbor had a similar experience with his brand new 1965 Chrysler: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...=1965+chrysler

    Craig

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  • JBOYLE
    replied
    A few months back, I got an old penny as part of some change after a purchase.
    Since it was really old, I thought I'd polish it to see what the year was. Turns out it was 1963.
    I think I'll lift up some of the new carpet in the Avanti and leave it there for some future owner to find.

    BTW: a couple days ago the same thing hapened ...I got another 1963 penny. Odd to see 49 year old coins still in circulation. Probably spent the last 30 ywears in someone's penny jar.

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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by 57pack View Post
    Hello, As a aside, the fellow who worked for Ford must have gotten his start at GM.
    I was at Fisher Chevrolet in 1970 when the new Monte Carlos came out. Customer brought back a green Monte back with a thump when he accelerated and a thump when he applied the brakes. Yes, a beer bottle under the back seat!
    Only Studebaker factory issue I came across was my neighbor complained about a squeak/groan coming from behind the front drivers seat in his new 1960 Lark wagon.
    Upon removing the front seat we bumped the left center door post, It Moved!
    Closer inspection revealed it had never been spot welded, guess it was Monday car.
    These things happened with all manufacturers. It is a people problem, not a particular manufacturer. I knew of problems at a Chrysler dealership that I worked full time at. One Plymouth had five pistons in a six cylinder car. Another had a Coke bottle suspended in a rear quarter panel to make a terrible noise.

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  • studegary
    replied
    Mike O'H - Sorry to bring up those memories. If it helps, I never purchased a car, new or used from Greer. Also, his son and daughter took over the business and they were better. I do have one interesting memory. I used to buy one to three year old cars, drive them for awhile, fix them and detail them and then sell them. I would then buy a $100 transportaion piece while I shopped for my next near new car. One day, Greer had a used car that I wanted. I showed up in my $100 car with a wad of cash in my pocket. After none of the approx. half a dozen salespeople on the floor would even acknowledge my presence, I asked for the Sales Manager. When I got him, I explained that I came to buy a particular car and showed him the cash for it. When he was going to get someone to help me then, I told him to forget it and walked out.

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  • 57pack
    replied
    Hello, As a aside, the fellow who worked for Ford must have gotten his start at GM.
    I was at Fisher Chevrolet in 1970 when the new Monte Carlos came out. Customer brought back a green Monte back with a thump when he accelerated and a thump when he applied the brakes. Yes, a beer bottle under the back seat!
    Only Studebaker factory issue I came across was my neighbor complained about a squeak/groan coming from behind the front drivers seat in his new 1960 Lark wagon.
    Upon removing the front seat we bumped the left center door post, It Moved!
    Closer inspection revealed it had never been spot welded, guess it was Monday car.
    Last edited by 57pack; 09-16-2012, 03:32 PM.

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  • 53commander
    replied
    When I worked for GM back in the 80s I found a torque wrench under the carpeting and we always found handfuls of trim screws under there too. My friend at a Ford dealer in the 90s found a beer bottle wedged in the fender of a new car that was just sold, it was back for a strange creak noise. The bottle was empty btw.

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  • hausdok
    replied
    Hi,

    No, that particular time it was not Greer's place. That time it was Bantam Motors in Bantam, CT.- Art Shooey's (sp??) place. I think it's closed now. Art raced stock cars on weekends and I heard he died in a roll-over up in Lebonon, NY years later.

    Don't get me started about Hubie Greer. We didn't part as friends. I was less than a year out of high school when I started working at Greer's place in Washington Hollow. It was where I first began working on, and gained a healthy respect for, Toyota vehicles. It was also while I worked there that I learned what it was like to work for someone who had no compulsions about making one of his employees feel like something you'd pick up on the sole of your shoe while walking through a barnyard.

    Hubie didn't mind abusing those lowest on his totam pole in those days. Myself and another one of his employees literally dug the footings and set and tied the rebar for the footings for the place he put up over in Wappingers falls in '71-'72. Sure, I knew how to do that better than most, because that's one of the things I'd been doing for years, and was doing on weekends working for my father, a custom builder in Amenia, but can you imagine being hired as a mechanic and then being told that you had to go dig ditches and set rebar - and if you didn't like it you could go find a job somewhere else?

    Imagine being 19 and newly married to your high school sweetheart and out on your own for the first time. When you're that kid you don't say no to the boss if you don't have a backup plan and I didn't. There was almost no dirty trick that his general manager and long-time best friend wouldn't pull to sell a car. I put up with it for a year and left; minus all of the backpay owed for hundreds of hours of overtime I'd worked and with a real good knowlege of how to turn back speedometers on year-old rental fleet vehicles.

    The place in Washington Hollow was on a raised backfill at the intersection of a Y-intersection. The EPA should sample the soil in the swampy area at the east end of that site. Thousands of gallons of anti-freeze went down that slope into that swampy area in the year I worked there and when the waste oil tank was full and the recycler wasn't due to be there for a week or so oil went there too. Same thing when the parts cleaner fluid needed to be changed. Guess who got ordered to dump it and when he questioned whether doing so would cause long-term contamination was told to keep his mouth shut or not to let the door hit him in the **s on the way out?

    When I left and threatened to expose them I was reminded that I was a kid and that Mr. G. was very rich and influential, and that he could ensure I'd never work in the automotive trade again; and, even if I managed to get a job, could make sure every cent I could earn for the next twenty years would go to them if he ever sued me for defamation.

    I put those guys in my rearview mirror and never looked back. Not one of my fondest memories and definitely not a part of my past that I'd ever be more than ashamed of. I make it a point not to think about that outfit.

    Sorry for the thread drift; guess the sound of that guy's name kind of pushed my buttons.
    Last edited by hausdok; 09-16-2012, 10:51 AM.

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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by hausdok View Post
    Back in the 70's a Toyota dealer I worked for sold Bricklins as a second brand. Those things have problems with the gull wing doors right out of the factory. We got one in off the carrier and one of the doors wouldn't close. I was assigned to fix it and while doing so found a high-speed pneumatic grinder some fellow in New Brunswick must have left under the front seat.
    I know that you used to live in this area. Are you referring to Greer Toyota? They were also a Bricklin dealer. The dealership was locally owned by the Greer family. Now, the dealership is owned b the nationwide DCH Group and they know nothing about being a Bricklin dealer. Someone that I know, just purchased their second Bricklin. I considered buying one new and also used ones, but have yet to own one.
    Last edited by studegary; 09-16-2012, 09:41 AM. Reason: missing y

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  • kmul221
    replied
    I found a pair of needle nose pliers under the carpet of a unmolested Packard Hawk I once owned(passenger side),they are around here somewhere ?

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    The place I worked at in the 70s - they considered taking on the Bricklin. We got two new ones and I well remember a buyer crying about having to stand in a driving downpour while the gullwing door majestically and SLOWLY opened for him. Of course, once soaked and in the drivers seat, there was the further distress of waiting for the door's equally majestic reclosure!

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  • hausdok
    replied
    Back in the 70's a Toyota dealer I worked for sold Bricklins as a second brand. Those things have problems with the gull wing doors right out of the factory. We got one in off the carrier and one of the doors wouldn't close. I was assigned to fix it and while doing so found a high-speed pneumatic grinder some fellow in New Brunswick must have left under the front seat.

    Leave a comment:


  • 50starlite
    replied
    Maybe it's my brothers (1952stude, Gene Lee) wrench, he worked on the Avanti line. He'd probably like it back.

    Dick

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    I've told this many times before, but there's new folks since I last did.

    About '76 or so, I bought a cream puff of a '58 Commander hardtop. While the car had fared the years with grace, it's carpets were not perfect. So one day I took the seats out and pulled up the carpets and jute backing. What I found was a very readable copy of the front page of the South Bend Tribune laid out flat. I remember it was the Sept. 14th 1957 edition and whoever had left it there had run the body bolts right thru it. I guess they wanted to make sure it stayed with the car. There was even the start of a lesser article beginning concerning union workers at Studebaker. Of course, the finish of that article was lost to the inside pages which weren't there. I wish I'd had the presence of mind to take a photo back then, but I regarded it as just a minor amusement.
    Another all original, unmolested '58 that I dealt with - when I pulled the rear flooring up there was the miniature grille from a '59 Lark promotional model stuck to the floor. I still have that grille around here someplace.

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  • herbpcpa
    replied
    No Guts...No Glory!
    I took a small piece of the carpet I knew I would not use and put paint stripper on it. After waiting for the stripper to work I scrubbed the rug with soap and water using a plastic bristled brush. Amazingly the paint stripper did not seem to harm the carpet or the carpet backing. Carpet looks great!
    Last edited by herbpcpa; 09-15-2012, 09:06 AM.

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  • SN-60
    replied
    To: herbpcpa,-----Interesting about the wrench.......just wondering if You were successful in removing the black paint from the carpeting?

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