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Made it bark!

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  • Made it bark!

    Doing some yard cleanup yesterday. Had this 289 out of a '61 hawk parts car sitting in the yard on a small pallet, in the way of everything. What to do, what to do? Figured if it was seized, I'd store in the old truck body at the bottom of the yard; if not, it should go in the barn.

    A pry bar between the ring gear teeth and a dowel pin revealed it would turn easily enough. So I drag my engine hoist over it, and lifted it up to a comfortable working level. Found a starter and a bellhousing, and mounted them so I could crank it. It cranked kind of slow but didn't seem to have any tight spots.

    So, having gone this far, might as well see if it will run, right? Found a coil, and cleaned the points with sandpaper. Shot a little gas into the 4-barrel manifold (no carb on it), and it fired, but seemed to lack compression. Out with the plugs, which were all pretty full of combustion deposits. Cleaned them a bit, and gave each cylinder six squirts of oil from an oil can. Cranked it over a couple of revolutions with the plugs out, to spread the oil onto the rings. Put the plugs back in, gave it another shot of gas, and vroom! It sure danced around on the chain holding it up. And made a huge smoke show. There was a blue haze around the place for a quarter hour. No mosquitoes, though.

    So I got an old but good Rochester4-jet carb off the shelf, and bolted that on, and put a short length of pipe in the fuel inlet so I could fill it from my gasoline squirt bottle. Lowered it, this time, so the oil pan was on the ground. Started it once more, and it seems to run pretty well. Sounded like it was hitting on all eight, or at least most of them. New plugs and a valve adjustment would certainly help. Oil pressure was over 40 psi, which is a little low for a cold engine. Incidentally, a Studebaker oil pressure gauge will screw right onto the fitting on the end of the little oil pressure flex hose. That is real handy to know.

    So then I had to spend the next 4 hours with the tractor; using the loader bucket as a hoist to shift engines and junk around in the barn to make room. It was well after dark when I got done, but now there is actually spare room in the barn!

    I don't know if I would use this engine as-is, except maybe as a temporary expedient, but ti would be a fine candidate for freshening up. Can't have too many 289s.
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

  • #2
    To: gordr,-----Wow!----You squirted a little gas into the manifold sans carb and it started ....that's pretty neat! (Who needs a stinking carburetor?)

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    • #3
      All the carb does is enable the engine to run slow. And there is not going to be much vacuum, so the velocity of the intake charge will be very low too. Not a good way to run an engine for more than a second or two. If the engine had knocked, or failed to have developed oil pressure on the gauge, I'd have quit right there.
      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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      • #4
        Geeze, Gord; might the oil pressure have something to do with the quality and unknown viscosity of the oil in it? You didn't say anything about changing the oil, although I'm sure you checked it before firing the engine.

        If it was really thin and crummy due to age and condensation, a fresh change might perk up the gauge, for sure.

        Good story. BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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        • #5
          I laughed so hard, I had to read it to my wife to make it less funny. I actually read into the third para before I realized this was Gord. Then finally it struck me...

          The auto industry is sure lucky Gord doesn't live in Minnesota. There's some old iron ore laying around on the ground there, and I swear, if he wasn't doing something else that day, he'd pick up a handful and end up with a running car by sundown. Jeeze.

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          • #6
            When I read one of Gord's posts, I always get this tune stuck in my head...

            Dick Steinkamp
            Bellingham, WA

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            • #7
              Actually, there wasn't any oil showing on the dipstick, so I put a liter of 10W30 in it, enough to show on the dipstick.
              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gordr View Post
                It sure danced around on the chain holding it up. And made a huge smoke show. There was a blue haze around the place for a quarter hour. No mosquitoes, though.
                .
                Now that is too funny...next time post a video so I can laugh even harder. Off topic, but did you get a chance to stop in Edmonton on the way home from Edson to take a look at that guy's 259 with the center exhaust pipes coming out of the top of the heads? Just wondering. Junior
                sigpic
                1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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                • #9
                  Never got a chance to see that custom 259. Maybe o a future trip.
                  Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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