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Approx. cost of frame-off resto on 57 GH???

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  • #16
    Originally posted by ROADRACELARK View Post
    This day and time......it's cheaper to buy one already done.....save yourself a lot of headaches.

    Dan Miller
    Auburn, GA.
    A ton of wisdom in the above statement. Especially if you dislike getting your hands dirty, do not have mechanical skills, and, once the job is completed, think you will have a "new" car to perform the same as other "new" modern cars.

    Let's face it...some folks just are not cut out to be active, participating, car hobbiest. I have seen it too often... dive in with unrealistic (but exciting) enthusiasm, eager to join clubs, seek office positions, and eat up the attention. Only to be come disillusioned the first time the water pump fails, gas or oil leaks, or the wiring shorts out. Sadly, I have seen some pretty nice people come and go in the past years. It is also a sad reality that most of these folks end up taking a financial bath on their cars.


    It is easy to get carried away by the chrome, rumble, and even the quaintness of some of our rides. But, if you have an aversion to tinkering, sweat, tow trucks, improvising, and grease...better to buy with "re-sale" attitude as your realistic back up plan.

    There are folks like me who enjoy working on the cars as much as driving and showing them off. I know others who enjoy their cars and are willing to pay others to do any work that the vehicle needs. As long as you are well grounded in reality, either way works. It is the folks that think you can pay others and get by on the cheap that get hurt.

    In my opinion, any restorable '57 GH is a worthy project. It probably wouldn't take much more to restore one of those as any other car of similar size when it comes to labor and materials. The question posed is very subjective and too many variables to put a set figure. How good are you at negotiating, sizing up the capabilities of people you hire, setting goals, time constraints, and, oh yeah...how much money can you spend?

    The good restorers are going to give you a cost-plus plan. It will be a phase project. Any person who would give you a set quote is (in my opinion) not a good businessman. I knew a person whose talent for restoration work was second to none. He gave a set quote on a museum quality brass-era Cadillac. After a couple of years, lawsuits, seemingly endless search for parts, one-off fabrication of unobtainable parts, the stunning car was completed. However, the contracted restorer was bankrupt, lost his fancy home in a gated community, and eventually his wife.

    It is a great hobby, but not worth all that.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

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    • #17
      I started out with a California car with a great body. I overhauled engine myself, had tranny gone through ( since it was out), I did most of mechanical myself. Having the body stipped and repainted and Southeast Studebaker completly redo the interior I am looking at approx. 42K with cost of car and trucking it back to Ohio.
      My advise - if your going drop that kind of cash, you better A) Restore the car you really want
      B) Plan on keeping the car for some time. C) Have an understanding wife!!
      Last edited by RareBird; 07-26-2012, 10:53 AM.
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      Packardbakerly,
      J.D.

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      • #18
        Here!! Here! John. What a great explanation, correct in every way. Right on.

        Dan Miller
        Auburn, GA

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