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3.5 Million Sq. Ft. Packard Plant

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  • qsanford
    replied
    Thanks Steve. I guess it is true- hindsight is always 20/20!

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  • 56H-Y6
    replied
    Originally posted by qsanford View Post
    I can never figure out why Packard, with a facility of this magnitude, had to subcontract out their body production.
    Hi

    In truth, they didn't have to subcontract body production for lack of space. Among the rationales over the years has been the urgency of ordnance work coming into the plant at the same time as the Clipper was in production preparation, 1940-41. If this was the reason, it was still a bad decision based on a short-term situation. Continuing to receive the stampings from Briggs and assembling themselves was a much better option. Additionally, Briggs had been intimately involved in the Clipper design and development, no doubt pressed hard to have its production remain in their facilities.

    Postwar, again the urgency of ramping up production to meet the pent-up demand kept the situation in place. Packard had by then become completely dependent upon Briggs for the body production. The cost of reinstituting body production at East Grand Boulevard had escalated dramatically in the intervening decade, while Packard's profitability had fallen to very low margins.

    All this lead up to the nail in Packard's coffin: the leasing from Chrysler and move of assembly to the crackerbox Connor Avenue plant in late 1954.

    Steve

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by JimsLeadCommander View Post
    Thanks Bob, for sharing these fine photos of fallen history.
    You're welcome, Jim; 'glad you enjoyed them.

    As I said, that day was the #1 item on my bucket list! BP

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  • JimsLeadCommander
    replied
    Thanks Bob, for sharing these fine photos of fallen history.

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  • qsanford
    replied
    I can never figure out why Packard, with a facility of this magnitude, had to subcontract out their body production.

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    I see Eastman listed as New York Distributer. Eastman was a very prominent name in NY in the late-1800s-early-1900s with things like Eastman-Kodak in Rochester and Eastman Business School in Poughkeepsie (brothers). I wonder if the NY Packard Eastman was related to these businessmen.

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  • JRoberts
    replied
    Sad pictures of what was once a beautiful buildings. But we have heard that story before haven't we?

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  • Lark8girl
    replied
    Thanks you so much for posting all the pics. To those who have never been there , it is the world's largest abandoned Industrial site. While on vacation Lark VIII girl and I toured the Packard plant perimiter, She Still talks of me taking her there on her vacation!

    Husband of Lark VIII girl.

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by Bordeaux Daytona View Post
    Does anyone know which entrance this was? I think the site said new employee training?

    Did they saved more than one? Somebody wrote that this one went to the museum in Ohio. I think that's the one Bob was standing by.
    That is correct, John; there were two similar entrances "saved."

    As you say, I believe the lower one, where I was photographed standing, went to The Packard Museum in Warren, Ohio.

    The other one, the one with columns and identified as The Employee Entrance, went to the Packard Motor Car Foundation Packard Proving Ground preservation site at Shelby Township Michigan.

    Here is the inside rear cover of the Winter 2009 Packard Cormorant, with the particulars:


    BP

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  • Bordeaux Daytona
    replied
    Does anyone know which entrance this was? I think the site said new employee training?

    Did they saved more than one? Somebody wrote that this one went to the museum in Ohio. I think that's the one Bob was standing by.
    Last edited by Bordeaux Daytona; 07-26-2012, 06:42 PM.

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by Warren Webb View Post
    I have had a keen interest in Packards ever since, as a kid, I brought home a library book entitled "OK FOR DRIVE AWAY", and read it cover to cover. So much so that I found it on e-bay & bought it. Now Bob has posted the winter 2009 issue of The Packard Cormorant that I had to have that too. It just arrived & is the best description of what the plant was & how it is today. It will take me awhile to digest all its info. Thanks again to Bob & all that have kept the interest here alive.
    You're welcome, Warren.

    'Better have a box of Kleenex at the ready when you read John F. MacArthur's excellent article on Pages 28-34, Warren. Especially Page 34.

    I still choke up reading it and it's been here almost three years. BP

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  • Warren Webb
    replied
    I have had a keen interest in Packards ever since, as a kid, I brought home a library book entitled "OK FOR DRIVE AWAY", and read it cover to cover. So much so that I found it on e-bay & bought it. Now Bob has posted the winter 2009 issue of The Packard Cormorant that I had to have that too. It just arrived & is the best description of what the plant was & how it is today. It will take me awhile to digest all its info. Thanks again to Bob & all that have kept the interest here alive.

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Thanks, Michael, for posting that link. I'd seen it before but forgot where it was.

    Good comparisons. BP

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeMichael
    replied
    This is a link to some great before and after pictures:

    http://detroiturbex.com/content/indu...ard/index.html

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
    I would want more than just a ball cap if I was concerned about what may fall a person in there! And maybe a bulletproof vest too! Craig
    'Not a bad idea either way, Craig... BP

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