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Welded stainless trim.. Would you put this on your car?

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  • #16
    Matt, I meant to tell you that the weld looked great. I googled Passivation and found this article. (I hope this link works)

    It has more info about the subject than my little brain wants to absorb at my age. However, being a young stainless steel entrepreneur like yourself...there could be some information that could be useful.
    http://www.cartech.com/techarticles.aspx?id=1566
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

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    • #17
      Matt,
      As you stated, a little more practice, and the seams will disappear! As others have stated, if there is NONE available, that looks great! practice, practice, practice!!

      Jim
      "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

      We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


      Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

      As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
      their Memorials!

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      • #18
        mbstude:
        From an article years ago about welding stainless on a custom car.
        The weld was done on the backside of the piece instead of from the front.
        Careful fitting of the pieces and the front showed very little evidence of a joint.
        Very little finish work to the front of the piece was required. No finish work would be required on the backside.
        South Lompoc Studebaker

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        • #19
          I have some idea how this started and should have mentioned trying to cut the parts at an angle and bevel, or compound angle like crown moulding joints on a long run. Fitment is more difficult, but the joint will be less visible.

          BTW, great first effort.
          Jim
          Often in error, never in doubt
          http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

          ____1966 Avanti II RQA 0088_______________1963 Avanti R2 63R3152____________http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

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          • #20
            Matt,

            Just my .02 cents worth: That piece you have "fixed" looks better than some of the original pieces on my car!!!
            1957 Studebaker Champion 2 door. Staten Island, New York.

            "Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think." -Albert Einstein

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            • #21
              Originally posted by jlmccuan View Post
              I have some idea how this started and should have mentioned trying to cut the parts at an angle and bevel, or compound angle like crown moulding joints on a long run. Fitment is more difficult, but the joint will be less visible.

              BTW, great first effort.
              Yea, it's all your fault.

              I'll try the angle cuts.

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              • #22
                This look fine to me.

                Another method is to make a good fitting joint and then spot weld a small strip or two across the backside. This way, there is no welding at the joint or on the front surface.
                Gary L.
                Wappinger, NY

                SDC member since 1968
                Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                • #23
                  Most ALL these opinions evade the truth to a degree. IF..... it's a part that someone CAN'T find in NOS or like new used condition - what would they do? Go without and be perpetually explaining why there's holes for the fasteners instead of perfect trim???

                  Yeah, I can see some CASO - down to needing ONE rare piece of unobtainium to complete his show-worthy restoration - and saying: "Nope! That ain't PERFECT enough for me! I'll just keep lookin'."

                  Matt, that trial piece looks stellar to me. WhatEVER you do, don't charge less than you would for a perfect one. You don't owe the Stude community that much.
                  No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by mbstude View Post
                    Yea, it's all your fault.

                    I'll try the angle cuts.
                    I did a Packard Hawk front fender splice.
                    It was accepted alright but I don't think the customer understood why I did it -- despite my explanation.
                    The rarity of the Packard Hawk piece is about the only piece that would make the effort worthwhile.

                    Jim's suggestion that an angle cut would be worth experimenting with is something I thought about, and was going to try, but had to give up the business when Dr. Wegner's invention influenced me to get a new hobby.
                    A curved piece would probably help the looks of an angle cut but I that's just my guess. Alignment will be touchy but you have alreasdy figured that out.

                    "Passivation" is something interesting to talk about but is not practical with respect to what you are doing.
                    To prevent passivation you could invest several thousand dollars in more equipment if damaged Packard Hawk front fender pieces becomes your mainstay of repair jobs.
                    Or you could just paint the joint inside and advise the customer to keep it well waxed on the outside. You might have a problem keeping clear coat on a highly polished piece.

                    Reinforcement strips on the back are a good idea but the clips still have to slide past that point. Also, pick a spot to do the splice that does not correspond with a clip location

                    At work in the syrup refinery we would fill the stainless pipe interior with a bath of CO2 (If I remember correctly.) before and during welding.
                    If that wasn't done, the expensive pipe (314ss) would only last a couple of months.

                    Something else that I was going to look at was to check the front one-foot of a C/K rear fender piece and see whether the curve was the same as the front end of a Packard H piece.

                    Have fun and don't let the nitpickers get to you. They have never tried it.
                    Last edited by Lark Parker; 07-21-2012, 12:33 PM. Reason: Because I wanted to.
                    sigpic
                    Lark Parker --Just an innocent possum strolling down life's highway.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Lark Parker View Post
                      Have fun and don't let the nitpickers get to you. They have never tried it.
                      My vote for one of the best lines on the forum...EVER!
                      John Clary
                      Greer, SC

                      SDC member since 1975

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                      • #26
                        On your next trip up I found some other stuff that might work. I'll test it on some of the pieces coming my way
                        Jim
                        Often in error, never in doubt
                        http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

                        ____1966 Avanti II RQA 0088_______________1963 Avanti R2 63R3152____________http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

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                        • #27
                          Bottom line. Unless you pointed out the weld to someone - who would notice? Most of us would take a fine weld over a dented or missing piece anyday
                          Last edited by RareBird; 07-21-2012, 03:06 PM.
                          sigpic

                          Packardbakerly,
                          J.D.

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                          • #28
                            I'd use it, and I'm picky.
                            Dave Nevin
                            Corvallis, OR
                            1953 Champion Deluxe Coupe
                            Stud-e-venture blog

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