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lowest milage RHC cruiser in the world

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  • lowest milage RHC cruiser in the world

    I came across this Australian delivered 64 cruiser through a friend of mind. The widow wishes to sell it and it has been parked for probably 40 years in this garage ( not climate controlled) , last registration, 1971 by the window sticker. Just thought the Forum members would like to see how they were assembled out here from new, and this is new, tyre never been out of the trunk, original everthing, 5200 miles! Check out the crap heater they were issued with, no climatiser here.
    Sorry I haven't a overall picture of the car, it was crammed in amid other vehicles and it was too hard to get a decent picture.












    Brian Greenall
    Melbourne, OZ
    sigpic

  • #2
    Hey Clark, I need a hand here, I tried deleting the other postings but to no avail., don't know what happen there.
    Brian Greenall
    Melbourne, OZ
    sigpic

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    • #3
      Brian,
      The "crap" heater was locally sourced to keep the Aussie componentry percentage at a high enough level to make the Studebaker brand competitive in price within Australia. In fact, that Smith brand heater was very efficient with its two speed operation. Too bad you did'nt add it to your own stable.

      \"QUIGLEY DOWN UNDER\"
      MELBOURNE.

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      • #4
        How much is she after Brian?
        pb

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 63r2 View Post
          How much is she after Brian?
          pb
          She sold yesterday Pete, after being on the market for 6mths. The widow didn't have any idea what it was worth, it was sold to the highest bidder, which there were only three interested bidders. $7000--8000 bracket
          Brian Greenall
          Melbourne, OZ
          sigpic

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          • #6
            Thanks Brian
            pb

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            • #7
              Brian: The spare tire -oops, tyre- appears to be a tube-type, with the tube having deflated over time to such an extent that the valve fell down into the wheel a bit.

              Would Australian cars have been fitted with tube-type tyres at the tyme? (Sorry; 'couldn't resist...)

              (I realize the tyres and tubes would have been locally sourced regardless of the type.) BP
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

              Comment


              • #8
                What really struck me as weird is the brakes: the pedal goes through the floor with the master cylinder underneath like a Hawk or 1960 (1961 RHC) down 'regular' Stude. I though the RHC cars by 1962 finally went with the suspended pedals like here.
                --------------------------------------

                Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 1962larksedan View Post
                  What really struck me as weird is the brakes: the pedal goes through the floor with the master cylinder underneath like a Hawk or 1960 (1961 RHC) down 'regular' Stude. I though the RHC cars by 1962 finally went with the suspended pedals like here.
                  Studes assembled in Australia never had suspended pedals. In fact did Studebaker offer suspended pedals in RHC cars anywhere?
                  I didn't think so.
                  Leon Martin, Australia.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by martincl View Post
                    Studes assembled in Australia never had suspended pedals. In fact did Studebaker offer suspended pedals in RHC cars anywhere?
                    I didn't think so.
                    I understand now; apparently all of the RHC Stude with suspended pedals were conversions.
                    --------------------------------------

                    Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                    Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                    "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It appears that the seat upholstery was also of local content as it doesnt match any Studebakers of that year that I have seen in the States. It's a great find, much like a buried time capsule.
                      sigpic
                      In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                        Brian: The spare tire -oops, tyre- appears to be a tube-type, with the tube having deflated over time to such an extent that the valve fell down into the wheel a bit.

                        Would Australian cars have been fitted with tube-type tyres at the tyme? (Sorry; 'couldn't resist...)

                        (I realize the tyres and tubes would have been locally sourced regardless of the type.) BP
                        The tyre has never been out of the trunk Bob. Hawk 64 will vouch for this, Jim predelivered this baby in 65.
                        Brian Greenall
                        Melbourne, OZ
                        sigpic

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                        • #13
                          Basically, due to items being removed to save duty with "local Content" what were in the boxes were body/frame/engine/gearbox/dash/steering wheel/ and axles. Upholstery, heaters radiators/batteries and other stuff were Aussie components. I imagine the Belgian, Chilean, Argentinian, South African and Israeli importers/assemblers did likewise. Would be interesting to have one of all these different cars together to see what was done. You can ask Brian in SB.
                          John Clements
                          Christchurch, New Zealand

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                          • #14
                            Looks like the spare wheel has been painted. There appears to be indication on the tyre that it has been masked off. Also the valve stem.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by packardHawk58 View Post
                              The tyre has never been out of the trunk Bob. Hawk 64 will vouch for this, Jim predelivered this baby in 65.
                              Cool, Brian. So at least some Australian cars still had OEM tube-type tyres in 1964/1965? Interesting! BP
                              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                              Ayn Rand:
                              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                              Comment

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