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1962 Lark $1,800

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  • 1962 Lark $1,800

    Dropped the price again, we'll see what happens.
    --------------------------------------

    Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

    Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

    "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

  • #2
    If I had the cash I'd be tempted. Get the absolute best, most flattering photos possible and this car could sell fast.
    '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

    "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by JimC View Post
      If I had the cash I'd be tempted. Get the absolute best, most flattering photos possible and this car could sell fast.
      I'm not the best photographer in the world but; I'm perplexed as to why it won't sell............

      Admittedly it has a Chevy 350/TH350 but still. Why I say that the car starts, runs, drives, stops and the vehicle is in my name with a clear title. Plus it's an Arizona car with good glass.
      --------------------------------------

      Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

      Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

      "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by JimC View Post
        If I had the cash I'd be tempted. Get the absolute best, most flattering photos possible and this car could sell fast.
        I agree about better pictures. The pictures that you are showing might be your intention to honestly show how the car looks as it sits. However, your goal should be to ignite interest and hopefully some passion for the car's possibilities. Most of us car guys have an imagination and can visualize how a car "could look," with proper attention and work. However, often the prospective buyer has a wife he has to share his vision with. While he might see the boxes of parts in the trunk, she thinks that is where you keep your garbage. The first picture you have is of the car hooked to a chain, at the back of a roll-back, and the hood popped.

        I am not trying to rain on your parade, but close the hood, clean out the car, put some wheel covers on the wheels, and take some sharper pictures. As for the extra parts...neatly stack, and organize them on the pavement and take a separate picture.

        Some imaginations need a kick-start. Unfortunately, some of your pics kinda kick it in the wrong direction. I don't mean to offend you by being so blunt, but, to me, it looks like a car with good potential. Don't get too discouraged, take some neater pictures, watch out for scammers, and I wish you the best of luck in finding a good home for the car.
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

        Comment


        • #5
          Do you still have the original engine and trans. to go with it?

          Right or wrong, I have found that the general buying public thinks a 4-door Studebaker needing restoration is not worth much; same car with a brand-x swap, barely a parts car. It's why I and others tried hard to talk you out of the swap. To most people, if they want to drive a 4-door car with a Chevy engine, they'll buy a Chevy- Nova, Malibu, Biscayne. As I said back then, what makes a 62 Lark worth buying to a Studebaker guy is the Studebaker engine. Wish I had better advice.

          For reference, I bought this one running and driving for $1K two years ago. So far I have buffed it, changed the seats, installed the brand new exhaust that came with it, and the usual belts and hoses. Runs great; I drive it daily this time of year.

          Proud NON-CASO

          I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

          If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

          GOD BLESS AMERICA

          Ephesians 6:10-17
          Romans 15:13
          Deuteronomy 31:6
          Proverbs 28:1

          Illegitimi non carborundum

          Comment


          • #6
            One other poster did comment that the economy is getting worse which is affecting sales of Studes.
            --------------------------------------

            Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

            Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

            "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

            Comment


            • #7
              if only it was closer.....
              http://datinmanspeaks.blogspot.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                I didn't want to say anything, but you've had the car listed several times and it hasn't gotten over $600 bucks. I've sold 3 Studebakers on ebay over the last year. All 3 cars ended up selling for a lot more than anyone expected, me included. The trick to that is GREAT pictures that flatter the car's looks, detailing it so every part looks as best as it can, and making it appeal to potential buyers. You want your car to stand out above the rest that are up for sale. The other trick is a good, long, honest description. Saying it "runs and drives" doesn't mean much, potential buyers want to know how well it'll do on a 500 mile trip. A drive around the parking lot isn't going to sell the car.

                All things equal, a '62 Lark 4 door is probably one of the least desirable Studes out there. They don't demand much money and Bob A.'s post about his thousand dollar Green Machine is proof of that. A few years back my granddad bought a '62 4 door off ebay, he won the auction for $400. It was in about the same condition as yours except it still had a Studebaker engine. If it had've been Chevy powered he wouldn't have been interested.

                Your car looks like a big project or worse yet, a solid parts car. The pictures of it chained to a rollback don't do any good, you might consider getting rid of those. The mismatched gauges, missing radio, dirty interior, exterior, and engine bay are all hurting you. The junk in the trunk and seat doesn't help either. You state that it runs and drives, but you don't state how well. A modification as big as an engine swap, people are going to be leery and want to be sure it was an improvement over what was originally there, other wise there's no appeal.

                "I did swap in a Chevy 350/TH350/Ford 8" 2:79 rear end so drivetrain parts will be no issue." I don't get that, since any drivetrain parts for a stock Studebaker aren't an issue to begin with.

                My advice.. Detail the car to look the absolute best that it can look. You swapped in another engine but didn't even wipe off the air cleaner. Make that engine bay look as good as it can. Wax the firewall and inner fenders, paint the block and heads, and slap on some cheap chrome valve covers and air cleaner. Tidy up the wiring and loose hoses and make it eye appealing. Clean out the interior and if the carpets are trashed, throw them out and paint that rust free floor. Go over all of the vinyl parts (seats, door panels, dash) with a soapy towel and clean them up. Paint the wheels and put on a matching set of hub caps. Shine the tires. Buff out the paint. Make it as shiny as it can be, and take pictures on an overcast day so that the paint's reflection shows in the photos.

                Overall.. Flatter the car. Doll it up, brag on how well it runs and drives, and take lots of appealing pictures. Don't lie about anything, but don't be afraid to emphasize on the high points.

                Here, I'll put my money where my mouth is. This wagon was posted on the forum last year as the first 3 pics show it. The consensus here was that it was worth $500 at the most. I took a leap and paid $1500 for the car and then another $500 to have it shipped to me.







                I rebuilt the brake system, buffed the paint, cleaned the interior and replaced the carpet, detailed the engine bay a little, put on a new exhaust system, and added some aftermarket wheels. I ended up selling the car for over $7000 on ebay. It's all about making your car have lots of "curb appeal".







                If you'd like, send me your email address and I'll send you the ebay ad for a '33 Commander that I sold. I listed that car for a friend and it too brought more than anyone thought it would.
                Last edited by mbstude; 07-16-2012, 06:39 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Very well said and demonstrated, young Matt!
                  sigpic
                  Dave Lester

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Studedude View Post
                    Very well said and demonstrated, young Matt!
                    Amen to that. Matt and John are spot on. That car WILL bring the money you want if you spend a day or two cleaning it up and taking some good pictures and providing a description that doesn't leave the reader with more questions than are answered.

                    I disagree with Bob, however. I believe you have a LARGER buying pool with the Chevy V8. Most of us here like Stude power and know it is dependable and that you can get parts, but there are FAR more potential buyers out there that don't know that. Stock power is a turn off to them. You may not sell it to one of the 13,000 SDC members...but you probably will to one of the other 2.000,000 vintage car fans.
                    Dick Steinkamp
                    Bellingham, WA

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 1962larksedan View Post
                      I'm not the best photographer in the world but; I'm perplexed as to why it won't sell............

                      Admittedly it has a Chevy 350/TH350 but still. Why I say that the car starts, runs, drives, stops and the vehicle is in my name with a clear title. Plus it's an Arizona car with good glass.
                      The other guys have pretty much nailed it, but I'll add my two bits. Making the car look good is key. Like Matthew said, clean it till it can't get any cleaner. Heck, doll it up with a "rattle can paint job" if you have the motivation to do so. I'll be honest, when I saw the picture of the car chained to the wrecker, my initial thought was that it looked like it was either fresh from a scrapyard or heading to one. That picture (and any others with tow trucks, chains, or other tools for moving dead vehicles) should be deleted and never see the light of day again, ESPECIALLY while trying to sell it. If you have the ability, take some videos of the car running. Rev the engine a few times. Get some shots of the thing cruising down the road. When you take photos, get a front and rear 3/4 shot (a 3/4 shot has the entire vehicle visible, taken from a diagonal perspective, so you should always have a side and either the front or the back in the shot). Avoid straight on shots of the front or side, they're boring, and won't help you sell. Experiment with lots of angles, some from as high as you can hold the camera (or stand on a chair even) and some laying on the ground aiming up.

                      In the past, I've had careers as both a photographer and in advertising, and I can attest to the fact that pictures will sell this car better than any description. (Side note: use words sparingly, and make them powerful!) The price of this car isn't outrageous, even at the original asking price. But selling a car is sort of like finding love on a dating website. The people out there are looking at pictures without really reading words (at least initially). They want the girl with photos showing off her perfect hair, nice makeup, and million dollar smile. It doesn't matter if the most amazing woman on earth is on that dating site; if her only photos are of her in ratty clothes with no makeup looking straight into the camera without smiling, she can advertise about her PhD in awesome all day long, and nobody's going to show interest.

                      Dress that car up as nice as you can. Drive it to a cool location and load a memory card full of catchy photos. Try to make it look like it belongs in Hemmings. If you do that, I would guarantee it will sell for more than you're offering it on the forums right here. It's an investment of time and a little money, but the return is well worth it.
                      Last edited by JimC; 07-16-2012, 11:25 PM.
                      '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

                      "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp View Post
                        Amen to that. Matt and John are spot on. That car WILL bring the money you want if you spend a day or two cleaning it up and taking some good pictures and providing a description that doesn't leave the reader with more questions than are answered.

                        I disagree with Bob, however. I believe you have a LARGER buying pool with the Chevy V8. Most of us here like Stude power and know it is dependable and that you can get parts, but there are FAR more potential buyers out there that don't know that. Stock power is a turn off to them. You may not sell it to one of the 13,000 SDC members...but you probably will to one of the other 2.000,000 vintage car fans.
                        I think the Chevy power makes a car more salable if it's in finished condition. A nice looking, well-executed 2-door like the one you had fits what you said here; but not a cosmetically untouched 4-door has lost its only redeeming point of real interest to the non-Stude fanatic.

                        I'm not beating on this, I chime in here as a cautionary tale. I'm afraid of the oft-repeated pattern: a guy buys a Studebaker, yanks a perfectly servicable stock drivetrain based on inaccurate assumptions about quality or parts availability and pieces in a Chevy drivetrain; has to sell and finds out he has created a half-breed that Stude fans don't want and the public at large are leery of the workmanship. The result is a car that's not desirable to either crowd, and an alienated seller who decides it must be because Studebakers aren't worth messing with- or is maybe frustrated completely out of the hobby. Meanwhile, the car is abandoned in a back yard, vandalized and rotting into the ground, and eventually to the crusher for a few hundred, less than what the market was actually willing to pay. We have seen this play out many times over the years, right on this forum.

                        I wish I had a good answer for the OP and this car. Everybody knows I have much love for Larks myself, and I have been known to do rescues, but I don't have the inclination to take on a 4-door that needs both a drivetrain replacement and overall restoration. There are too many untouched out there for cheap prices.

                        Best thing I can offer is as Matthew says above; then be patient, and spend a lot of time marketing it everywhere you can think of. Good luck, and hope the poor old girl finds a loving home.
                        Proud NON-CASO

                        I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

                        If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

                        GOD BLESS AMERICA

                        Ephesians 6:10-17
                        Romans 15:13
                        Deuteronomy 31:6
                        Proverbs 28:1

                        Illegitimi non carborundum

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Allow me to add: I am NOT a purist. While I tend to prefer Studes as they came from the factory, I have zero problem with a well-done modified car. We all can and should do what we want with our own cars. I'm just saying, we need to understand and be realistic when we modify; not only do we have to find a buyer for our car, we have to find one that agrees with our vision- and trusts our workmanship. That can be tough with a $100K pro build; those usually sell for a fraction of build cost, even for a desirable model. On an unrestored car? Tougher.

                          We have a member who has/had a Corvette with a Stude flat 6. He did what he wanted and has a unique, quirky, fun car. But hopefully he realizes what he did to the value of it and has made provisions- no permanent mods, saved original drivetrain, etc- or understands he will take a huge hit if he has to sell.

                          Nothing wrong with that; we're supposed to enjoy our cars. But there's two sides to that coin.
                          Proud NON-CASO

                          I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

                          If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

                          GOD BLESS AMERICA

                          Ephesians 6:10-17
                          Romans 15:13
                          Deuteronomy 31:6
                          Proverbs 28:1

                          Illegitimi non carborundum

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Matthew Burnette, Bob Andrews, and John Clary have nailed the situation spot-on, Pierce. Please do not be offended by their suggestions and input, and heed their advice if you want to sell the car. There's just no way around it: It needs several hours of elbow grease, a few dollars worth of clean-up materials, and a far better presentation.

                            We can (and will) debate the Chevy engine issue until the cows come home, and they are at the back fence line right now showing little interest in pursuing barn occupancy, so the end of that discussion is not in the foreseeable future.

                            For better or worse and for the time being, the Chevy drivetrain is in there and the car will likely be sold "as equipped," so that is one thing you'll probably not change in the course of trying to sell it. Its presence or the advisability of having done it, regardless of who, when, or why it was done, is now a moot point. (In the interest of full disclosure, it looks like the car was a V8, so my opinion remains that unless the Studebaker V8 had thrown a rod through the side of the block, rendering it junk, and the Chevy engine ran well and was free....well, you get the idea....)

                            Anyway, I haven't followed the details of your car that carefully, so maybe you've answered this elsewhere: It might be an idea to decode the engine's identification number could you can state conclusively exactly which "Chevy engine" it has. Then include a photograph of that engine number in the ad so Chevy engine experts can verify it if they want.

                            Make sure it does run and drive well. When you're done spiffing it up, take it on a short round trip of, say, 100 miles, so you you can report that it does drive as you say with no odd vibrations, irregular braking, pulling to one side, and such. And, of course and above all, be honest about it. If it has some odd characteristic between 55 and 58 mph, say so if you can't sort it out.

                            This thread has provided you with excellent advice from experienced sellers. Best wishes for the car's preparation and sale. BP
                            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                            Ayn Rand:
                            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Bob, just for the record, it was a running 259 stick/od that just needed the usual fine tuning. You can follow the timeline of about a year:

                              http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...earchid=874095
                              Proud NON-CASO

                              I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

                              If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

                              GOD BLESS AMERICA

                              Ephesians 6:10-17
                              Romans 15:13
                              Deuteronomy 31:6
                              Proverbs 28:1

                              Illegitimi non carborundum

                              Comment

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