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  • #31
    Originally posted by Mr. Bill View Post
    Would it be the little "Packard" script mounted on the right of the deck lid? Bill Sapp
    An excellent catch, Bill, and you're exactly right! The brochure was done early in the year and the Packard script wasn't added until January 1956. Therefore, their car would have had the script when delivered, since it was probably built in March or early April.

    You get extra points 'cause I hadn't even thought of that...and you're right.

    There is another difference I had in mind, though, that is more obvious.

    Any idea, anyone, what it might be? It's an oddity, for sure. BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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    • #32
      Was a radio of any kind standard on a Clipper Super? I don't see a mention of it on the P.O. and I would think Mr. and Mrs. Williams would have enjoyed a radio in their new car, especially since they paid a substantial amount of money for the pleasure of air conditioning. Then again, maybe not and by deleting the radio, they felt better about splurging for air conditioning.

      The brochure model doesn't show a radio antenna that I can see, so is that it? My other answer would be a difference in the tint of the glass, especially on an a/c car like the Williams purchased.

      Bill Sapp
      Hamlet, NC
      Last edited by Mr. Bill; 07-14-2012, 02:14 PM.

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      • #33
        Bill, you're right about the radio, too: Their car was ordered without a radio, which is downright odd given all the other options. But no antenna is shown on the brochure car, either, so theirs and the brochure car would look the same in that regard.

        Tinted glass would be difficult to determine with any certainty on the brochire illustration, too, so that's not it.

        Study the options they ordered and the brochure illustration a little more carefully, 'cause you'll get it in a minute and be really surprised! BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #34
          Interesting that the Aero Willys was a "Lark" Nice to have the memorabilia.
          John Clements
          Christchurch, New Zealand

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          • #35
            Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
            Study the options they ordered and the brochure illustration a little more carefully, 'cause you'll get it in a minute and be really surprised!
            If that brochure car had air conditioning, it would have the clear plastic tubes in the corners of the rear package shelf, and would be clearly visible.
            Craig

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            • #36
              Originally posted by BobPalma View Post

              Study the options they ordered and the brochure illustration a little more carefully, 'cause you'll get it in a minute and be really surprised! BP
              They did not order the optional Chrome Wheel Discs.
              Bob Langer
              Glenshaw,PA

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              • #37
                Ah, wheel "discs" instead of wheel "covers." Most unusual on an almost $5,000 1956 automobile that was supposed to be more upscale.

                Craig, beginning in 1955, Packards utilized an upfront air conditioning system that ducted through two pop-up vents on the dashboard. The vents had the inscription "Modern Air" inscribed onto them. Below are two examples that show the vents opened and closed.

                Bill Sapp
                Hamlet, NC
                Last edited by Mr. Bill; 07-14-2012, 04:01 PM.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Bob Langer View Post
                  They did not order the optional Chrome Wheel Discs.
                  BINGO! Can you imagine ordering all those options, including White Wall tires, and taking delivery of that pretty car with dog-dish hub caps on it?

                  Well, it must've happened...or they figured out they forgot them and Dad found a set to put on it for them. BP
                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Mr. Bill View Post
                    Mr. Palma: Don't forget the 1954 Pontiac "8" models that could be optioned with the fully integrated Harrison supplied through the dashboard factory air conditioning. This was the first year air conditioning was available in a Pontiac and was the basis for integrated air conditioning in GM cars in the future.
                    Here's the Motor Trend's tests on both Nash and Pontiac:







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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Mr. Bill View Post
                      Craig, beginning in 1955, Packards utilized an upfront air conditioning system that ducted through two pop-up vents on the dashboard. The vents had the inscription "Modern Air" inscribed onto them. Below are two examples that show the vents opened and closed.
                      I do know Studebaker retained the trunk-mounted evaporator with the tubes on the rear shelf in 1956. It makes sense that Packard went to the under-dash unit as Studebaker didn't offer any convertibles in those years, now that I see your photos.

                      Craig

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
                        If that brochure car had air conditioning, it would have the clear plastic tubes in the corners of the rear package shelf, and would be clearly visible. Craig
                        Craig, 1955 and 1956 Packards did not have the trunk-mounted evaporators of old.

                        They were integral, in-dash units with two little vents on top of the dashboard to blow cold air on you. Those vents had flip-open covers so you could open or close them at will.

                        Here's a poor reproduction of Plate 1 from the appropriate Packard Parts Book, but there's enough here so you can see the major components of the system and where they were located:

                        http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/mo...o.php?lid=1026
                        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                        Ayn Rand:
                        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Yes, Studebaker utilized an air conditioning system sourced from NOVI that was trunk mounted beginning mid-year '55 and continuing through the '57 model year. I have also seen one '58 Packard hardtop and one '58 President sedan with these systems. I assume they were leftover stock (either factory or dealer installed?) as the Packard had the correct "Packard Car Air Conditioning System" tag and the Studebaker had the "Studebaker Car Air Conditioning System" tag. These tags were in place of the standard NOVI labels and I feel this was an attempt by Studebaker-Packard to give the impression that these sytems were a genuine Studebaker-Packard manufactured unit.

                          With the 1957 Packards being built off the Studebaker President platform, the Packard in dash air conditioning units went away, replaced by the units Studebaker used, first the NOVI trunk system and beginning in '58, the Sutton under dash system - about as homely an appearing under dash box one could want - in my opinion, of course. However, this system made air conditioning a reality for station wagon models.

                          Bill Sapp
                          Hamlet, NC
                          Last edited by Mr. Bill; 07-14-2012, 08:17 PM.

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                          • #43
                            Thanks for the input and 1955/1956 Packard clarification for Craig, Bill. I was searching for an appropriate illustration and you were busy posting!

                            Anyway, good work all around on the Great Air Conditioning Discussion. BP
                            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                            Ayn Rand:
                            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                            Comment

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