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Whatever it takes to make a [Studebaker] deal

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  • Whatever it takes to make a [Studebaker] deal

    There's an old expression in the car biz: "Whatever it takes to make a deal."

    Apparently, James Thompson liked a certain 1950 Studebaker Champion Coupe more than his 1949 Ford Tudor, but Palma-Rhoads Motors liked the tires off the Studebaker more than did Mr. Thompson!

    And since Mr. Thompson worked 23 miles away at Shapp Marathon (7th and Cherry, Terre Haute IN), he would be in a position to remove the Studebaker's tires and return them to the selling dealer.

    (Hey, like the man said, "Whatever it takes to make a deal!"):

    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    Back in the 60s and 70s era when steel radials were still somewhat unusual, I would always buy a new car with the understanding that I got credit toward my trade-in for it having brand new tires off the new car. I would keep my radials and give the new tires back to the dealer.

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    • #3
      I was hoping there would have been a live chicken, or pig, in the deal
      HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

      Jeff


      Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



      Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
        I was hoping there would have been a live chicken, or pig, in the deal
        That can be arranged, Jeff...but it didn't involve a Studebaker because they wouldn't be a Studebaker dealer until eight months later:



        I wonder where "Shorty" was kept in stock during the 25 days he was in inventory. It was November, after all. It certainly added a new meaning to the work stock from an automobile dealer's viewpoint (but not from a farmer's point of view, of course; he knew what stock was all along!):



        'Prolly would have made your wife a helluva deal on him, Jeff! (Hmmm...if they had sold "Shorty" at a loss, would that have been a short sale or a shorty sale?)

        ....but would you have been able to come up with $50 worth of coal to heat Palma Motors in the winter of 1954-1955? It was quite a few uninsulated cubic feet. BP
        Last edited by BobPalma; 07-12-2012, 06:47 AM. Reason: added Shorty's sale
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by BobGlasscock View Post
          Back in the 60s and 70s era when steel radials were still somewhat unusual, I would always buy a new car with the understanding that I got credit toward my trade-in for it having brand new tires off the new car. I would keep my radials and give the new tires back to the dealer.
          Ya try that today, the salesman or woman would say What!! I don't understand what you want, you don't even get to choose the color let alone the tires.
          Candbstudebakers
          Castro Valley,
          California


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          • #6
            Bp, seeing these type of things is a real treat and brings back good memories , and I would bet you have boxes of these?
            Candbstudebakers
            Castro Valley,
            California


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            • #7
              Talk about PUSH-PULL-OR-DRAG! LMAO

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              • #8
                WOW...these are priceless!
                I love that that the salesman was sure to adhere to the notation at the bottom for SERIAL-MOTOR-KEY on Shorty's invoice.
                I'm a bit surprised the "KEY" entry wasn't "Apple or Carrot".
                Andy
                62 GT

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by candbstudebakers View Post
                  BP, seeing these type of things is a real treat and brings back good memories, and I would bet you have boxes of these?
                  Yep, Bob; I do...plus the scrapbook from which I post things from time to time.

                  Every car they ever sold in 4 years being in business, new and used, has a separate invoice. AFAIK, I have every one of the originals. (It's easy to keep track of them; the Red Invoice Numbers in the upper right corner, like #651 in the below item, are in sequence. If any numbers were missing, I'd know it. There aren't.)

                  They're a real hoot, but Shorty-the-Quarter-Horse has always been my favorite... especially when the 'horse-tradin' got them a bunker of coal to heat the shop that winter.

                  'Times you'll never see again...at least not formally on paper!

                  I still haven't figured out how they sold two Willys pickups to Absarokee, Montana! One had a drawbar and one had a tow bar, so maybe one pulled the other out there. (I hope the one that got the oil filter did the towing!)



                  BP
                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Andy R. View Post
                    WOW...these are priceless!
                    I love that that the salesman was sure to adhere to the notation at the bottom for SERIAL-MOTOR-KEY on Shorty's invoice.
                    I'm a bit surprised the "KEY" entry wasn't "Apple or Carrot".
                    Good One, Andy.

                    The salesman was my Dad: L.S.P. (Lumir S. Palma). As he is fond of saying about he and his Brother Milton's years in business, "We had a lot of fun until we ran out of money....like Packard."

                    My wife and I and our little grandson Will (Dad's Great-Grandson) are meeting Dad and Mom this evening (July 12, 2012) for supper. He's getting around slower with a walker now, at age 95, but is in fine shape mentally; very much "with it." BP
                    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                    Ayn Rand:
                    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Those are great, and I am sure there were many other 'unusual trades' back then. I do like the bartering for coal 'deal.'

                      I used to do financial consulting to dealerships, and I would always look at the used car inventory quit closely because it could be interesting reading. About 1995 I was at a dealer and he had a swimming pool listed in his used car inventory. I knew there would be an interesting story here. The store had an 'i'll take anything in trade promo, and a guy came with a complete above ground swimming pool to trade, so they made the deal. He wasn't sure what he was going to do with the pool but was determined to make an interesting promo out of it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                        I still haven't figured out how they sold two Willys pickups to Absarokee, Montana! One had a drawbar and one had a tow bar, so maybe one pulled the other out there. (I hope the one that got the oil filter did the towing!)
                        That almost appears to be a 'dealer-to-dealer' sale. Perhaps The Stillwater Garage had an immediate sale for two of them, and the zone manager for the region informed him Palma Motors had two. What was the Refund Check for?

                        Craig

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
                          That almost appears to be a 'dealer-to-dealer' sale. Perhaps The Stillwater Garage had an immediate sale for two of them, and the zone manager for the region informed him Palma Motors had two. What was the Refund Check for? Craig
                          I have no idea about the refund check, Craig.

                          But I'll bet $50 they didn't have one Willys truck in ordinary stock, much less two. They would only have those had someone ordered them. They were simply too small to stock more than maybe 4 or 5 new vehicles total, including Packards, Nashes, Ramblers, Willys, Jeeps, and, by that time, a little Metropolitan!

                          Believe me, they would not have had two Willys trucks in stock. I was there most of the time I wasn't in school or sleeping, being "almost 9" when that ticket was written!

                          That said, this deal is so unusual that I'll try to remember to ask Dad if he remembers any particulars when we have supper with them this evening, and repost with any follow-up info. BP
                          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                          Ayn Rand:
                          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I once dealt with an Avanti buyer from Virginia. He was on a trip looking at several Avantis. He claimed that he would pay the price without quibbling. After taking my Avanti to a garage and putting it on a lift to check out the bottom, he wanted to pull the spark plugs and do a compression check on the engine. I drew the line at that. After stating that my 1963 Avanti was the best one that he found, he started to get into price. He ended up leaving the wheels and tires that were on my Avanti and putting on some that he brought with him. Of course, this was after the price was reduced.

                            I wonder why a Studebaker dealer would rather have a 1949 Ford in stock than a 1950 Studebaker (even trade).
                            Gary L.
                            Wappinger, NY

                            SDC member since 1968
                            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                            • #15
                              I can remember deals or proposals with Boats, Motorhomes, Farm Equipment, Motorcycles, and even a Moped 30 years ago. The horse deal is the best I've ever seen, Bob.

                              Usually, if someone came in with something too far out of the norm, we'd try to connect them with someone (preferably, one of our customers) who dealt in that kind of item for a buy bid. Kind of like the "Pawn Stars" calling in their "experts". I imagine with the recent downturn in the overall economy the past few years, there's never a dull day in the appraiser's office at some used car lots. Amazing, this thread made me think about how I remembered that the car business acts and feels like an episode of "Pawn Stars" the first time I watched that show.

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