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  • We dont work on the rusty ones....

    Was calling a few local exhaust shops regarding my exhaust leak and that was the response that I got. The collector bolts are rusted solid it would appear. We damn near soaked them in wd-40 to no avail. We tried heating them up. We werent able to get them to budge at all. We sure gave em hell! I have the gaskets ready to go, just need to pull the thing apart to do it. No air tools to work with. Anyone got a tip or trick breaking them free?


    Got a couple other shops to try, hopefully they will work on the rusty ones.
    1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon


  • #2
    Originally posted by cultural infidel View Post
    Was calling a few local exhaust shops regarding my exhaust leak and that was the response that I got. The collector bolts are rusted solid it would appear. We damn near soaked them in wd-40 to no avail. We tried heating them up. We werent able to get them to budge at all. We sure gave em hell! I have the gaskets ready to go, just need to pull the thing apart to do it. No air tools to work with. Anyone got a tip or trick breaking them free?


    Got a couple other shops to try, hopefully they will work on the rusty ones.
    WD-40 is not your best option. Go to BP Blaster or the ATF/acetone mix. Looking from the top of the manifold you should see the threaded holes that the studs are in. Hit them with BP Blaster from above and also soak the studs and nuts with it. After a while, heat the studs with a torch and spray again. Keep this up on both the nuts, hole and studs. Remember acetone is flammable so I'd try the commercial first.

    Also use a wire brush to get rid of as much rust as you can.

    What you are trying to do if wick the release agent into the threads. Hopefully this will help. If you don't have a torch use a propane torch.

    Bob

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    • #3
      Everything Bob said and use 6 point sockets ,wrenches if possible. Good luck.
      Neil Thornton

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      • #4
        You may be better off to remove the exhaust manifold on each side, so you can get at it better, since you may wind up doing some drilling and tapping. While you are at it, have the manifolds "surfaced" at a machine shop. Put it back with all new fasteners, and use "anti-seize".

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        • #5
          IN order to remove the manifolds, you may have to cut the pipes a foot or so down from the flange. If the metal in the pipes is good, you can weld them back together later.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sweetolbob View Post
            WD-40 is not your best option. Go to BP Blaster or the ATF/acetone mix. Looking from the top of the manifold you should see the threaded holes that the studs are in. Hit them with BP Blaster from above and also soak the studs and nuts with it.
            Bob
            I think that you mean PB Blaster. I don't want him looking for the incorrect thing.
            Gary L.
            Wappinger, NY

            SDC member since 1968
            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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            • #7
              Originally posted by studegary View Post
              I think that you mean PB Blaster. I don't want him looking for the incorrect thing.
              I actually read it as PB Blaster. I will spray that on there tonight.

              I have to drive it tomorrow. So I will suffer with the leak for another day. If I can't get it taken apart this weekend, I may take it in to a shop next week that I have gone to many times before to see what they think. My old Dodge came apart so easily when I needed to fix the exhaust, its kind of frustrating that the Stude is being so stubborn! lol
              1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cultural infidel View Post
                Was calling a few local exhaust shops regarding my exhaust leak and that was the response that I got. The collector bolts are rusted solid it would appear. We damn near soaked them in wd-40 to no avail. We tried heating them up. We werent able to get them to budge at all. We sure gave em hell! I have the gaskets ready to go, just need to pull the thing apart to do it. No air tools to work with. Anyone got a tip or trick breaking them free?


                Got a couple other shops to try, hopefully they will work on the rusty ones.
                My mechanic son's trick on frozen bolts/nuts is to heat them with a propane torch then rub an ordinary candle on the heated part then put the wrench to them (six point as another suggested). On reassembly anti-seize is your friend.
                Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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                • #9
                  As crazy as it sounds that heat it up and put a candle to it works great. I've done it many times myself on frozen bolts. Not %100 but has gotten me out of more than one spot.

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                  • #10
                    In the worst case scenario: i.e. the exhaust studs breaking off the 'ears' from the manifolds: new ones are available from Dorman and a few other outfits for about $100 each. Just specify a Ram's Horn for a 1960's SBC.
                    --------------------------------------

                    Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                    Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                    "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

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                    • #11
                      Remember too, cast iron can take a lot of heat. Torch it cherry red with an oxyacetylene. Quick shot of Blaster. Don't give it a chance to cool before wrenching with a six-point socket. Remember afterwards, your socket will also be very hot.
                      "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                      Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                      '33 Rockne 10,
                      '51 Commander Starlight,
                      '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                      '56 Sky Hawk

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by studegary View Post
                        I think that you mean PB Blaster. I don't want him looking for the incorrect thing.
                        Well!!!! actually I was suggesting that he take the car to BP (Bob Palma) and have him spray his PB Blaster on the parts.

                        In any case, Gary Thanks for cleaning up my oversight.

                        Bob

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                        • #13
                          I hope those dorman studs are a dollar each and not $100, but i haven't priced any in a while and nothing shocks me anymore!
                          Randy Wilkin
                          1946 M5 Streetrod
                          Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

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                          • #14

                            Thats what I am working with. The angles to get a socket in there absolutely suck. I had also never seen that middle "donut" (for lack of a better time) on a car before. The gaskets that I was told to purchase via NAPA's website look like a blue graphite donut instead of a flat gasket. Is this the correct gasket?
                            1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon

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                            • #15
                              You may be able to get a nut splitter in there. Use it to split the nuts then chase the threads after you get it apart and use the anti-sieze when you put it together. It can save a lot of time not messing with the old nuts.
                              Rob

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