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Being Razed: Little Piece of Studebaker's South Bend (good pic)

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  • Chris_Dresbach
    replied
    Well I have some unfortunate news. As of today (7/9/12) Toasty's is no longer.

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  • Mr Speed 53
    replied
    I kmow this is an old post but wanted to comment since ii am finnaly back registered on the forum.Many Good Times were had by us at the Toasty ! I read in turning Wheels one year that the Plain Brown Wrapper was going to be displayed ant the old museum and delivered on the day after Thanksgiving. We went to South Bend and met Bob and Georgeat the Toasty by chance,then over to the museum to watch the PBR get put on display after listening to many good stories they shared with us. The weather was mild and no salt on the street so bob asked my son if he wanted a ride in PBR and they took off thru what was left of the the old Stude corridor. I can remember hearing the Wonderful Sound and 2 smiling faces under the train bridge heading towards us. Jr and me will never forget this ! Thanks

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    I love this kind of pic!!!!
    This is what we all need to do in our Studebaker travels.
    Find that connection to the past, record it, and share it with anyone and everyone.
    There's a lot of guys smiling down on you for (a) taking that pic, and (b) sharing that pic.
    As ol' Dave would say... "Good on ya!"
    Jeff

    Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post


    I ate at The Toasty Shop dozens of times. This photo was taken in July 1983 during the Intl meet week (note sign marquee "Studebaker Week...). The car in the foreground is a 1931 model 90 President Eight belonging to Sherm Merchant of New York. The car in the background my '40 Champion Coupe Delivery. The guy posing I thought was a local street person but he informed me that he worked at Studebaker in the styling department (honest!). In any event this is looking southeast in the parking lot. Note the spelling "The Toasty Shop."

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    New photo from SDCer Bob Dudek:

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  • Chris_Dresbach
    replied
    That's the transpo bus stop now. It's amazing how close N&A was to Sherman Shaus/Freeman Spicer.

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by redbullet View Post
    It was also a short walk south from the Studebaker dealer, Newman and Altman. Just the other side of the tracks.
    I ate there many times when I worked at Newman and Altman and Avanti Motors back in the 60's and early 70's
    Tom Mills
    Good observation, Tom; thanks.

    Tom is correct: Look at the sliver of street in the picture's foreground, the street going right and left across the bottom of the photograph. You can't see much of it, but it is Main Street.

    If you went to your left on Main Street in the bottom of the photo, you'd immediately go under the railroad tracks. As soon as you went back up from the underpass, Newman-Altman would be on your left...as Tom says, just on the other side of the tracks on Main Street. BP

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  • redbullet
    replied
    It was also a short walk south from the Studebaker dealer, Newman and Altman. Just the other side of the tracks.
    I ate there many times when I worked at Newman and Altman and Avanti Motors back in the 60's and early 70's
    Tom Mills
    Last edited by redbullet; 06-17-2012, 05:50 PM. Reason: add

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by Bordeaux Daytona View Post
    Ed George , some friends, and I ate there a few times when we would come out to South Bend. We talked about the story about Egbert eating there. There was pictures from South Bend and Studebaker hanging on the walls inside. They food was pretty good and the staff was very nice there too. I thought I had some pictures but they must be prints. I did find a picture from J.M.'s office of the administration building from the tour in 2007. I noticed the sign in the lot across said toasty shop and you can see the building too. It's a shame it'll be gone.
    John V.
    John; that's an excellent perspective. Thank you for finding and posting that picture.

    To understand this photograph, note the street going from the lower right up to the center of the photo. That is Bronson Street.

    At the center of the photo, note that Bronson Street ends at Michigan Street.

    Michigan Street is one-way at that point, so you would have to turn left from Bronson onto Michigan. You would then immediately go under the railroad tracks to continue north on Michigan.

    Now, if you drove "up" Bronson Street in this photo, toward Michigan, imagine yourself stopping at Michigan and waiting for the light to change so you could turn left and go under the railroad tracks.

    While you were waiting at the light, The Toasty Shop is that single story building immediately to your right. It has kind of a beige brick wall facing Bronson Street with no windows along Bronson. Access to the place and its parking lot are on the other side of the building, unless you stopped short of passing The Toasty Shop and went up that fresh blacktop alley between The Toasty Shop and the larger white building along Bronson.

    This excellent photo, taken from The Studebaker Administration Building, shows you how very close The Toasty Shop was to The Administration Building. It was indeed a short walk from The Adm Bldg to The Toasty Shop for a cup of coffee or lunch, and many Studebaker executives took advantage of that proximity.

    Thanks again, John, for making this so understandable with such an appropriate photo. BP

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  • StudeMichael
    replied
    "But when you're 17, who thinks of what life will be like 50-odd years later, eh"?

    That is the quote of the day, Bob!

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  • Bordeaux Daytona
    replied
    Ed George , some friends, and I ate there a few times when we would come out to South Bend. We talked about the story about Egbert eating there. There was pictures from South Bend and Studebaker hanging on the walls inside. They food was pretty good and the staff was very nice there too. I thought I had some pictures but they must be prints. I did find a picture from J.M.'s office of the administration building from the tour in 2007. I noticed the sign in the lot across said toasty shop and you can see the building too. It's a shame it'll be gone.
    John V.
    Attached Files

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post

    I ate at The Toasty Shop dozens of times. In any event this is looking southeast in the parking lot. Note the spelling "The Toasty Shop."
    Thanks for the correction, Dick. It seems like a subsequent owner, toward "the end," added pe to the name to augment it with a little class, but I may be mistaken.

    'Appreciate the clarification; duly noted in the original post as it was indeed Shop in 1963...and for most, if not all, its life before it became The Paramount ever so briefly. BP

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by (S) View Post
    Come up to the Great Northwest Bob. We have better coffee and there is a LARGE number of Studebaker fans rebuilding the cars and the shelters for them as if it were South Bend. circa 1950-1964

    More Studebaker tech, fans, and info lives in the NW than anywhere I have seen. And we have by far the most studes per capita on the road than anywhere.........
    'Don't believe I'd challenge your assertion, Mike, if our SDC Forum is any indication! BP

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
    To: Bob Palma,-----Really not trying to make You feel worse, and of course hindsight's always 20/20, but Your absolutely right... that was a HUGE missed oppurtunity.
    Ed, you're right, of course. Who knows how that conversation with Mr. Egbert might have gone? And if we did have the "nerve" to approach and converse with him, would we have had the presence of mind to secure an autograph?

    But when you're 17, who thinks of what life will be like 50-odd years later, eh?

    To the best of our memories, George and I never took a camera with us to South Bend...I mean, like most of the people in South Bend at the time, we just thought this [Studebaker] was going to go on forever, so what's to record for posterity? (And besides, some of the places in which we were caught might have resulted in a given camera being confiscated anyway.)

    Good memories, though. 'Twas a privilege to have been there at the time, for sure. BP

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  • Studebaker Wheel
    replied


    I ate at The Toasty Shop dozens of times. This photo was taken in July 1983 during the Intl meet week (note sign marquee "Studebaker Week...). The car in the foreground is a 1931 model 90 President Eight belonging to Sherm Merchant of New York. The car in the background my '40 Champion Coupe Delivery. The guy posing I thought was a local street person but he informed me that he worked at Studebaker in the styling department (honest!). In any event this is looking southeast in the parking lot. Note the spelling "The Toasty Shop."

    Leave a comment:


  • (S)
    replied
    Come up to the Great Northwest Bob. We have better coffee and there is a LARGE number of Studebaker fans rebuilding the cars and the shelters for them as if it were South Bend. circa 1950-1964

    More Studebaker tech, fans, and info lives in the NW than anywhere I have seen. And we have by far the most studes per capita on the road than anywhere.........

    Leave a comment:

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