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Being Razed: Little Piece of Studebaker's South Bend (good pic)

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  • Being Razed: Little Piece of Studebaker's South Bend (good pic)

    From South Bend SDCer Don Galeziewski comes the sad news that the former Toasty Shop, a short half-block east of The Studebaker Administration Building at the corner of Michigan and Bronson, is being demolished. The neighborhood has deteriorated to such an extent, and the population density during the day is such, that it will no longer support that type of deluxe coffee shop and short-order cafe.

    I looked through The South Bend Tribune on line this morning but find no mention of the impending demolition. Don says the demolition fence is up and destruction is imminent, so perhaps there will be a small item in "The Trib" when it's actually a pile of rubble.

    "Toasty's" was a neat place where many hard-core Studebaker folks frequently dined and swapped lies. Studebaker administrators ate there, too, including Sherwood Egbert.

    At the risk of boring "regulars" here, I'll repeat the story of cousin George Krem and I eating a late breakfast at The Toasty Shop one early summer day in 1963. As we paid our checks at the cash register, we saw Sherwood Egbert sitting at the lunch counter, working on what was probably his first pack of cigarettes for the day and who knows how many cups of coffee.

    We were no more than 20 feet from him, but were simply too shy to go over, offer words of thanks and encouragement, and perhaps get his autograph on a napkin or something. For my part, I consider that THE missed opportunity of all our adventures in South Bend during the summers of 1960-1963....but at ages 17 (me) and 21 (George), we were simply too reserved of character, as difficult as that might be to comprehend, to approach him. "Mr. Egbert" was by himself, too, so we would not have been interrupting any conversation he might have been having with fellow "execs." Sigh.

    Both of us ate there many times, individually and with other friends through the years. I looked forward to meeting my friend Don at Toasty's for lunch in the early 1990s when "on location" for Studebaker facility photo shoots to prepare Turning Wheels articles at that time.

    The Toasty Shop was known as The Paramount in later years before closing for good several years ago. Note Dick Quinn's post below as to the eatery's spelling.

    It was a classy, homey little eatery, the type of which is disappearing from the landscape too often nowadays for this nostalgic observer. Perhaps someone has a photo of the place and will post, or I can try to find one later in the day as time allows.

    RIP, "Toasty's." BP
    Last edited by BobPalma; 06-17-2012, 06:16 AM. Reason: spelling
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    That is one of the coolest Studebaker stories that I have ever heard. There should be some sort of effort by us younger SDCers to collect these types of stories, as the folks in my generation weren't born until after Studebaker had ceased making cars we won't have the type of close connection to the company that many SDCers do.

    Now if I could just get Ken Burns to do a documentary on the Studebaker corporation and the SDC movement that followed...
    Wouldn't that be something!
    sigpic
    1961 Flamingo Studebaker Hawk

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    • #3
      Toasty Shoppe - One of the best names EVER for a coffee shop/diner.
      Andy
      62 GT

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Andy R. View Post
        Toasty Shoppe - One of the best names EVER for a coffee shop/diner.
        Maybe it will re-open as a tanning salon under the same name.

        Craig

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        • #5
          I have stopped there for lunch during past May swap meets. The place does have history.

          Denny L

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          • #6
            TOASTY SHOPPE has special memories for me and my wife, Mary.

            Mary's 1st time driving solo: she and a girl friend went to TOASTY's and as they were leaving, pulling out onto Michighan Steet, the steering broke on the car and it had to be towed. The car was a Chevrolet, so what could you expect.

            In the 1960-63 era I went to TOASY'S for their foot-long hot dogs ( almost once a week during the summer). As for a Studebaker connection................we were both clue less!
            Last edited by White Hawk; 06-15-2012, 03:53 PM.
            sigpic

            Mike Barany

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            • #7
              I saw the demo fence put up about three days ago. Unfortunately the place has been empty for years. There has never been much of an attempt to open a new restaurant there that I can remember, heck, not even a "for sale" sign in the window. I think my mom used to work there.
              Chris Dresbach

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              • #8
                I made a point of dining there during meets of the past. Sad to hear of it's demise.
                No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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                • #9
                  To: Bob Palma,-----Really not trying to make You feel worse, and of course hindsight's always 20/20, but Your absolutely right... that was a HUGE missed oppurtunity.

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                  • #10
                    thanks Bob Palma what a great story i get goose bumps just reading about it, i have been to south bend 6 times or more over the years drove all over town just soaking up the scenery taken pictures but i must say i must have mist that place sevreal times . thanks again mr Palma. ray
                    rawise

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                    • #11
                      Come up to the Great Northwest Bob. We have better coffee and there is a LARGE number of Studebaker fans rebuilding the cars and the shelters for them as if it were South Bend. circa 1950-1964

                      More Studebaker tech, fans, and info lives in the NW than anywhere I have seen. And we have by far the most studes per capita on the road than anywhere.........

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                      • #12


                        I ate at The Toasty Shop dozens of times. This photo was taken in July 1983 during the Intl meet week (note sign marquee "Studebaker Week...). The car in the foreground is a 1931 model 90 President Eight belonging to Sherm Merchant of New York. The car in the background my '40 Champion Coupe Delivery. The guy posing I thought was a local street person but he informed me that he worked at Studebaker in the styling department (honest!). In any event this is looking southeast in the parking lot. Note the spelling "The Toasty Shop."
                        Richard Quinn
                        Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
                          To: Bob Palma,-----Really not trying to make You feel worse, and of course hindsight's always 20/20, but Your absolutely right... that was a HUGE missed oppurtunity.
                          Ed, you're right, of course. Who knows how that conversation with Mr. Egbert might have gone? And if we did have the "nerve" to approach and converse with him, would we have had the presence of mind to secure an autograph?

                          But when you're 17, who thinks of what life will be like 50-odd years later, eh?

                          To the best of our memories, George and I never took a camera with us to South Bend...I mean, like most of the people in South Bend at the time, we just thought this [Studebaker] was going to go on forever, so what's to record for posterity? (And besides, some of the places in which we were caught might have resulted in a given camera being confiscated anyway.)

                          Good memories, though. 'Twas a privilege to have been there at the time, for sure. BP
                          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                          Ayn Rand:
                          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by (S) View Post
                            Come up to the Great Northwest Bob. We have better coffee and there is a LARGE number of Studebaker fans rebuilding the cars and the shelters for them as if it were South Bend. circa 1950-1964

                            More Studebaker tech, fans, and info lives in the NW than anywhere I have seen. And we have by far the most studes per capita on the road than anywhere.........
                            'Don't believe I'd challenge your assertion, Mike, if our SDC Forum is any indication! BP
                            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                            Ayn Rand:
                            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post

                              I ate at The Toasty Shop dozens of times. In any event this is looking southeast in the parking lot. Note the spelling "The Toasty Shop."
                              Thanks for the correction, Dick. It seems like a subsequent owner, toward "the end," added pe to the name to augment it with a little class, but I may be mistaken.

                              'Appreciate the clarification; duly noted in the original post as it was indeed Shop in 1963...and for most, if not all, its life before it became The Paramount ever so briefly. BP
                              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                              Ayn Rand:
                              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                              Comment

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