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  • Looking for value of my newly inherited Hawk

    Newby here and looking for ball park value from any of you Studebaker guys and gals on my newly inherited 1959 Silver Hawk. This car has been sitting in my aunts garage for over 43 years. It is black with red interior and all original except for the engine....I think. I am a Pontiac guy but have always thought the Silver Hawk was pretty cool car every since I was about 5 years old and seeing it sitting in the garage. From the little research that I have done I know that it was originally a V8 car because of all the chrome (stainless steel) moldings. The car has a V8 in it now but don't know what motor it is and I don't know at this point whether it will run or not. The mileage is showing 47K which I believe to be correct. It has some rust on the fenders and alittle on left quarter panel in front of rear wheel. It has no carpet in it, the windshield is cracked on passenger side and keys are lost and of course needs tires.
    I'm afraid that I would spend more money on it than its worth. Although I do love the car and would like to see it restored to its full beauty.
    Thanks in advance for anyones comments.



























    Last edited by PONCHOLOVER78; 06-10-2012, 05:53 PM. Reason: ADDING PHOTOS

  • #2
    Best color combo in my opinion Black / red . . . And save that dealer tag on the trunk lid if you restore it . . My kinda car !

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    • #3
      Thank you. Looks like I posted this in the wrong section. I will try to move it. Thanks again!

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      • #4
        Yeah : The guys dont look way down here as often . . .

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        • #5
          Need advise on what you think this car is worth the way it sits?

          Looking for value of my newly inherited Hawk.
          Newby here and looking for ball park value from any of you Studebaker guys and gals on my newly inherited 1959 Silver Hawk. This car has been sitting in my aunts garage for over 43 years. It is black with red interior and all original except for the engine....I think. I am a Pontiac guy but have always thought the Silver Hawk was pretty cool car every since I was about 5 years old and seeing it sitting in the garage. From the little research that I have done I know that it was originally a V8 car because of all the chrome (stainless steel) moldings. The car has a V8 in it now but don't know what motor it is and I don't know at this point whether it will run or not. The mileage is showing 47K which I believe to be correct. It has some rust on the fenders and alittle on left quarter panel in front of rear wheel. It has no carpet in it, the windshield is cracked on passenger side and keys are lost and of course needs tires.
          I'm afraid that I would spend more money on it than its worth. Although I do love the car and would like to see it restored to its full beauty.
          Thanks in advance for anyones comments.
          Looks like I originally posted this in the wrong section. See my post in SDC and Forum Discussions to see many photos.
          Also, can anyone tell me what engine this car has by the pictures?
          Last edited by PONCHOLOVER78; 06-10-2012, 06:59 PM.

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          • #6
            Thanks for your quick reply. I've moved my post but have referred people to this section to see photos. Any idea what I could expect to get for it if I were to sell it?

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            • #7
              Better wait for the Hawk experts to reply . . But the price could just about be anything . Depending who wants it .

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              • #8
                Opinions will vary greatly. A ball park $$ is hard to pin down based on pics, many, many many variables. Is the frame solid? Trunk and floorpan mostly there? I'm pretty sure it's going to need a new tank and the driveshaft in the back seat tells me the tranny is bad. Does the engine turn free? I'd bet it's going to need an engine rebuild after sitting 40+ years. *If* the frame is OK and no major floorpan repair, I'd venture a range of $1200 to $2500. If you can find a buyer with a donor car or someone who had a Silver Hawk "back in the day", you would probably get the best price.

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                • #9
                  Thats kinda what I was thinking. I don't actually have the car at my house yet. My cousin has it at his house right now which is on the market. So, once the house sells I will need to get it out of there pretty soon. Thinking about taking jack stands and floor jack to get the wheels off of it so I can get some tires that will hold air on it to make it easier to move. For the heck of it I posted it on craigslist here in Kansas City this past week just to see what kind of interest there was on the car. No sooner that I posted it my phone was blowing up. There seems to be quite a bit of interest for sure but, didn't know what the car is worth. Definitely don't want to give it away. Plus, if I can get it home and see if I can get it running and rolling it should bring more I suppose. Really would love to restore it but, I have a 1978 Pontiac Trans Am that was my first love that I'm trying to finish up the restoration on it before I take on another project like this. Ah well!
                  Take care and we'll see what the Hawk experts have to say. I'm really looking forward to see what they have to say. Thanks again!
                  Last edited by PONCHOLOVER78; 06-10-2012, 07:34 PM.

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                  • #10
                    I haven't got it home yet and I only had about a half hour to look at it the other day but, since there was no carpet in the car I could tell the the floor pans are very solid with only some surface rust on them. The trunk I wasn't able to open because they have misplaced the keys....another problem.....and I'm pretty sure the reason the driveshaft is out is because of the lost keys and they couldn't get it out of park to get it out of the garage and onto the flatbed tow truck. After 40+ years of sitting its hard to say about the engine and trans. I guess I'll find out soon. Thanks for your reply 63 R2 Hawk.
                    Last edited by PONCHOLOVER78; 06-10-2012, 07:35 PM.

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                    • #11
                      One thing to watch out for is to be careful when opening the hood. These hoods need to be pulled forward a little after unlocking otherwise the rear corners will be bent. Perhaps not common in other makes, but more than one person has bent their hood. Better to know now, best wishes with it. Depending on offers, maybe you could keep it and do it up after the Pontiac? The price is right if it was free to you.
                      John Clements
                      Christchurch, New Zealand

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                      • #12
                        Is it just me, or does that look like a Buick V8 under the hood?
                        Paul
                        Winston-Salem, NC
                        Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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                        • #13
                          Yes, Paul, that is a 1963-1966 "nailhead" Buick V8. 'Prolly have to get some numbers and Buick experts to pin it down, but the "window" Delco distributor started in 1957, and PCV and alternator in 1963, per later posts.

                          It looks like the hood won't even close on that carburetor, but maybe that's just the angle of the photo.

                          With all due respects and all other things equal, that lowers the value of the car, since it was a V8 car originally (59V-C6 body tag) Poncholover seems sincere in asking for realistic valuation, so it may well be around $1,000, in reality.

                          Still, Poncholover, any finned Hawk is a cool car nowadays, so thanks for bringing it by, and welcome aboard. BP
                          Last edited by BobPalma; 06-11-2012, 07:01 AM. Reason: eliminated 1953-1962 Buick V8 due to distributor, alternator, and PCV
                          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                          Ayn Rand:
                          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                            Yes, Paul, that is a 1957-1966 "nailhead" Buick V8. 'Prolly have to get some numbers and Buick experts to pin it down, but the "window" Delco distributor started in 1957. It looks like the hood won't even close on that carburetor, but maybe that's just the angle of the photo.

                            With all due respects and all other things equal, that lowers the value of the car, since it was a V8 car originally (59V-C6 body tag) Poncholover seems sincere in asking for realistic valuation, so it may well be around $1,000, in reality.

                            Still, Poncholover, any finned Hawk is a cool car nowadays, so thanks for bringing it by, and welcome aboard. BP
                            Judging by the alternator: maybe a 1963-66 Buick Nailhead? If that's the case; the car probably has a TH400 (1964-66 motor only, 1963 was the last year of the Dynaflow).
                            --------------------------------------

                            Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                            Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                            "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

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                            • #15
                              You'll be upside down if you do a full restoration. I bought mine for $2000 with the understanding that everything needed to be replaced. Once I bought the production order from the museum, I relaized it was pretty clsoe to the way it came, and put it back that way. $50,000 later it aprraised in at $30,000. But I love it.
                              Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

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