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  • GREAT Studebaker story from today.

    I had a mechanic press the bushings in the rear springs of my newly acquired Lark and was heading home. I was headed west on highway 12 in Michigan City, Indiana when I got stuck at the redlight in front of the casino. A man pulled up behind me in a later model red econo-box and got out of his car. He was holding some paper in his hand so I assumed he was lost or something. All he said was, "you'll have fun with this" as he handed me the papers. He also said "you need valve guides!" I yelled back to try to talk to him but he took a right hander and never even looked back! I looked down to see what he handed me and it is a large format 76 page book from Studebaker called 100 years on the road. Cool huh! Man you Studebaker nuts are a cool group of people. If my mystery gifter is reading this, THANKS!

    Geoff

    "I can resist everything but temptation."

  • #2
    Wow! I wish that would happen to me. That book is pretty valuble. Congratulations.


    [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
    '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
    '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
    Museum R-4 engine
    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

    Comment


    • #3
      Wow! I wish that would happen to me. That book is pretty valuble. Congratulations.


      [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
      '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
      '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
      '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
      Museum R-4 engine
      Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
      '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

      Comment


      • #4
        It was really wild. I wanted to talk to him or thank him or something but he was gone and took a turn before I could see where he went. It was a wierd Friday the 13th for me. I woke up and opened my front door to be greeted by a lost Huskie dog and then that happened. THe book is in great shape, says it was printed in 1952. What a cool thing, couldn't believe it happened to me!

        "I can resist everything but temptation."

        Comment


        • #5
          It was really wild. I wanted to talk to him or thank him or something but he was gone and took a turn before I could see where he went. It was a wierd Friday the 13th for me. I woke up and opened my front door to be greeted by a lost Huskie dog and then that happened. THe book is in great shape, says it was printed in 1952. What a cool thing, couldn't believe it happened to me!

          "I can resist everything but temptation."

          Comment


          • #6
            Ok! This is weird.A buddy of mine went to Wisconsin to look at a car up there last week.He called me Monday night and told me that he had picked up a book at a flea market up there that I might want.It was called 115 years of Studebaker.I went over and picked it up wednesday night.Great pictures and reading .It starts with the trip across the Atlantic with the Studebaker family ,even names the ship they sailed on to the end of Studebaker in Canada.Then theres a section on the Avanti. My birthday is the 23th ,I call this my early birthday present.

            David Baggett '53 coupe

            Comment


            • #7
              Ok! This is weird.A buddy of mine went to Wisconsin to look at a car up there last week.He called me Monday night and told me that he had picked up a book at a flea market up there that I might want.It was called 115 years of Studebaker.I went over and picked it up wednesday night.Great pictures and reading .It starts with the trip across the Atlantic with the Studebaker family ,even names the ship they sailed on to the end of Studebaker in Canada.Then theres a section on the Avanti. My birthday is the 23th ,I call this my early birthday present.

              David Baggett '53 coupe

              Comment


              • #8
                I went out in the Transtar yesterday. I was on a mission to get some damned metric bolts for the wife's Toyota. It's been a fairly trouble-free conveyance ever since being built from a wreck in '02. But every once in awhile, I'll get a call from the wife that she's stuck in some parking lot and the ignition switch won't work - the key refuses to turn the switch, no matter what she does. And of late it's gotten to be too common an occurrance.
                Of course, Toyota - in their wisdom - has "securified" the Ign switch by using bolts with heads you can only tighten - not loosen.
                After an hour of lying on my back and chiselling at the heads of those goofy fasteners, I finally get them out and am in need of REAL bolts or screws a guy can work with! I know Lowes carries a decent selection of metric hardware and so I fire up the Stude and head for that store.
                I'd parked in front of Lowes, gone in and found adequate bolts, rolled the dice once again with those stupid, self-checkout scanners and lost and after the bored, little check-out clerk had corrected the scanner's goof, I found myself walking back towards the Transtar.
                Halfway back to where it's waiting, I realize there's an older couple (as in my age) doing a walk-around of the truck. This sorta thing is not unusual. Pete (the Transtar) draws lots of attention and praise.
                As I get within talking distance, I ask as I usually do: "Well, whaddya think?"
                The guy comes back: "The wife and I were just reminiscing - about the ol' Stude truck I used to drive. Used to drive that thing every day, I did. Had it at least 12 years or so...... Wish I'd never sold it."
                Wife chimed in: "I didn't want him to sell it when he did. It was more a matter of economics than bein' sentimental." Poking hubby's shoulder with her forefinger, she lamented: "HE had a yearning for a new truck! On the other hand, I was thinking about the monthly payments that would follow. It'd been differen' if the Studebaker wasn't running good or was looking shabby. But that wasn't the case, tell the truth. He just had the new truck bug! Heh - never should got rid'a that Studebaker." she said longingly.
                Then the guy opens up again and asks (while looking at me): "You don' remember me, do you? I chased you down in the grocery store parking lot a few years back. I'd found the old owners manual from that truck and wanted you to have it."
                "Aha!" I shot back. " I DO remember that day! I've still got it.
                In fact, it's here in the glove box - I'll show you!"

                After I retrieved it from the glove box (which, BTW, I doubt has ever seen a pair of gloves[B)]), I let him handle it. It'd been at least 8 years or more since he had stopped me one day to entrust me with this booklet. It was easy to see that he was pleased his gift had been appreciated.
                He flipped it open to the second page and tapped a weathered finger at the penciled information thereupon: "Yup, there's the serial number - right where I wrote it that first day. E seven, nine oh four oh. Don't 'member what I paid for it, but I remember I traded an older Studebaker truck for it." He looked towards the orange evening sky as he tried to recall details - or maybe he was just recalling a mental image of the truck. I didn't break in on his concentration.
                He flipped the book shut again and handed it back to me. "Sure glad I gave that to you! I always enjoy catchin' a glimpse of your truck around town."
                "Me too!" added the wife. "And we always have to look at it again whenever we spot it parked somewhere like here."

                After exchanging parting pleasantries, I drive off as they watch. Neat couple. Wonder how often she needles him about the Stude that got away[?]
                Anybody driving a 3E7-12 Transtar with the serial # of E7-9040??? That's the serial# he'd penciled in that first day.[^]

                Miscreant adrift in
                the BerStuda Triangle


                1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                1960 Larkvertible V8
                1958 Provincial wagon
                1953 Commander coupe

                No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I went out in the Transtar yesterday. I was on a mission to get some damned metric bolts for the wife's Toyota. It's been a fairly trouble-free conveyance ever since being built from a wreck in '02. But every once in awhile, I'll get a call from the wife that she's stuck in some parking lot and the ignition switch won't work - the key refuses to turn the switch, no matter what she does. And of late it's gotten to be too common an occurrance.
                  Of course, Toyota - in their wisdom - has "securified" the Ign switch by using bolts with heads you can only tighten - not loosen.
                  After an hour of lying on my back and chiselling at the heads of those goofy fasteners, I finally get them out and am in need of REAL bolts or screws a guy can work with! I know Lowes carries a decent selection of metric hardware and so I fire up the Stude and head for that store.
                  I'd parked in front of Lowes, gone in and found adequate bolts, rolled the dice once again with those stupid, self-checkout scanners and lost and after the bored, little check-out clerk had corrected the scanner's goof, I found myself walking back towards the Transtar.
                  Halfway back to where it's waiting, I realize there's an older couple (as in my age) doing a walk-around of the truck. This sorta thing is not unusual. Pete (the Transtar) draws lots of attention and praise.
                  As I get within talking distance, I ask as I usually do: "Well, whaddya think?"
                  The guy comes back: "The wife and I were just reminiscing - about the ol' Stude truck I used to drive. Used to drive that thing every day, I did. Had it at least 12 years or so...... Wish I'd never sold it."
                  Wife chimed in: "I didn't want him to sell it when he did. It was more a matter of economics than bein' sentimental." Poking hubby's shoulder with her forefinger, she lamented: "HE had a yearning for a new truck! On the other hand, I was thinking about the monthly payments that would follow. It'd been differen' if the Studebaker wasn't running good or was looking shabby. But that wasn't the case, tell the truth. He just had the new truck bug! Heh - never should got rid'a that Studebaker." she said longingly.
                  Then the guy opens up again and asks (while looking at me): "You don' remember me, do you? I chased you down in the grocery store parking lot a few years back. I'd found the old owners manual from that truck and wanted you to have it."
                  "Aha!" I shot back. " I DO remember that day! I've still got it.
                  In fact, it's here in the glove box - I'll show you!"

                  After I retrieved it from the glove box (which, BTW, I doubt has ever seen a pair of gloves[B)]), I let him handle it. It'd been at least 8 years or more since he had stopped me one day to entrust me with this booklet. It was easy to see that he was pleased his gift had been appreciated.
                  He flipped it open to the second page and tapped a weathered finger at the penciled information thereupon: "Yup, there's the serial number - right where I wrote it that first day. E seven, nine oh four oh. Don't 'member what I paid for it, but I remember I traded an older Studebaker truck for it." He looked towards the orange evening sky as he tried to recall details - or maybe he was just recalling a mental image of the truck. I didn't break in on his concentration.
                  He flipped the book shut again and handed it back to me. "Sure glad I gave that to you! I always enjoy catchin' a glimpse of your truck around town."
                  "Me too!" added the wife. "And we always have to look at it again whenever we spot it parked somewhere like here."

                  After exchanging parting pleasantries, I drive off as they watch. Neat couple. Wonder how often she needles him about the Stude that got away[?]
                  Anybody driving a 3E7-12 Transtar with the serial # of E7-9040??? That's the serial# he'd penciled in that first day.[^]

                  Miscreant adrift in
                  the BerStuda Triangle


                  1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                  1960 Larkvertible V8
                  1958 Provincial wagon
                  1953 Commander coupe

                  No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Bob,

                    I added your story to my thread on an idea for a column on Studebaker musings in Turning Wheels.

                    Gary


                    Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                    The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                    �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                    For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                    "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bob,

                      I added your story to my thread on an idea for a column on Studebaker musings in Turning Wheels.

                      Gary


                      Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                      The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                      �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                      For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                      "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks Gary. That's fine with me.

                        Miscreant adrift in
                        the BerStuda Triangle


                        1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                        1960 Larkvertible V8
                        1958 Provincial wagon
                        1953 Commander coupe

                        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks Gary. That's fine with me.

                          Miscreant adrift in
                          the BerStuda Triangle


                          1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                          1960 Larkvertible V8
                          1958 Provincial wagon
                          1953 Commander coupe

                          No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Great stories, guys! Thanks.

                            Western Washington, USA

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Great stories, guys! Thanks.

                              Western Washington, USA

                              Comment

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