Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Reliable tech specs?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Reliable tech specs?

    So I am already thinking about my "next" project now that my truck is in its end stages of build.
    I am wanting a 4 door early Lark or 4 door wagon. I know many will hate it, but I think I am going to set the body on a modern chassis with all modern running gear and all of the modern convieniences.
    I want to build it for my daughter and my wife to be able to drive it comfortably and reliably.
    I know ALL of the arguements that a well set up Stude can be reliable...yada yada yada...not what I want to do on this build. I love my Stude powered truck hot rod and would not change that for the world, but I want a new car under a Lark body on my next build.

    Is there anywhere I can get all of the specs for the Larks or even all Studes for that matter?

    In an online wheelbase and track width specs search I have found very conflicting specs in the same articles...frustrating.
    One article I found says the front track width is 57.4" and the rear is 48.5". I seriously doubt the track width is about 9" different front to rear especially with the rear beilng narrower.

    Another article says on one side of the page that all wheel bases are 110" while in the main artcle on th eother side of the page it says that they are 108.5" and wagons are 113" and taxis are 113".

    Where can I get reliable specification info?

    Anyone have a taxi body and sheetmetal they want to get rid of? Cheap of course, this is me afterall.
    Are Taxis very common?

  • #2
    re: taxi's. if you can get your hands on "Turning Wheels" August 2011, that edition had a lot of info on taxi's.
    Kerry. SDC Member #A012596W. ENCSDC member.

    '51 Champion Business Coupe - (Tom's Car). Purchased 11/2012.

    '40 Champion. sold 10/11. '63 Avanti R-1384. sold 12/10.

    Comment


    • #3
      Cheap of course, this is me afterall.
      Even a CASO needs a Studebaker Shop Manual. They have exact measurements and lots of drawings of the frame and mounting points.

      jack vines
      PackardV8

      Comment


      • #4
        This site will supply some specs.

        http://carnut.com/specs/specs.html
        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
        '33 Rockne 10,
        '51 Commander Starlight,
        '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
        '56 Sky Hawk

        Comment


        • #5
          Early Larks had 108.5" wheelbase that was increased later to 109 with a change in the rear leaf spring. The wagons and later 4 doors had 113" wheelbase. Whoever the source was with the 48.5 rear track is unreliable & I wouldnt trust anything from there. I've read S-10 frames used but I believe that was on Champ trucks but the Lark 4 door 62 on would work in that case as would a wagon. I can supply the frame diagrams for you.
          59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
          60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
          61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
          62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
          62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
          62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
          63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
          63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
          64 Zip Van
          66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
          66 Cruiser V-8 auto

          Comment


          • #6
            An S10 Blazer is 107.8" long which is less than 3/4" less than an early 4 door Lark. That could easily be made up with a redrilled locator hole in the rear axle spring perches and a rear E-brake cable adjustment. The track width on the S10 is about 55" which the Lark is about 57" to 58" so 1 to 1.5" offset rims in the backset or wheel adapters would get that back.

            I am not really concerned with body mounts, I can weld well enough to fab those and make it work.

            Just seems like a pretty easy fix and I could possibly even utilize the driver airbag but I doubt I would use the dash and the passenger side air bag. I would like the 4.3 V6 with a 4 speed OD trans. I am thinking it could run about 20 mpg combined and be crazy reliable, I have had 2 trucks/vans with the Vortec 4.3 and OD trans and that combo was INDESTRUCTABLE and trust me I tried.

            I just like the idea. My daughter want a vintage car and loves Larks. I just am not as comfortable putting her into a 50 year old car as I am in a modern car. I know it is not popular here, and it is no knock on the Stude quality and potential reliability, but a 2003 S10 Blazer with well under 100K miles on it still has about 200K of reliability and I can find them for under $4000.00 I just can not rebuild a Lark chassis for that let alone a motor, trans, brakes, differential, and all of the little things a 50 year old car would need.

            Seems like an affordable option.

            Jack, I am not gettin a manual until I pick a car that I will build. I am not against other models like Land Cruisers or any other 4 door cars, so I am just gathering info and saving right now.
            Last edited by kmac530; 05-30-2012, 08:30 AM. Reason: spelling

            Comment


            • #7
              I really appreciate your desire to incorporate safety into the build. Some things to consider:

              collapsible steering column, side collision prevention (look at the interior of a recent car door and the reinforcement at the post), 3-point belts, roll-over protection, improved lighting, removal of sharp edges in the interior, seats with safety in mind.

              If taking a CASO approach, it might be far less expensive to stick a lark front end on a later model car (or truck). You might even be able to graft more of the body onto the newer car. I know it might be considered sacrilege, but we're dealing with loved ones here. Just try to think of some of the crazy things you did when you were your daughter's age behind the wheel of a car.
              Dave Nevin
              Corvallis, OR
              1953 Champion Deluxe Coupe
              Stud-e-venture blog

              Comment


              • #8
                Somebody in my area put this Lark on a Bronco II 4WD chassis. Looks like it came out OK. There's lots of Bronco II's around that can be had for a CASO price. Just something else to think about.
                Rick
                Kingman, AZ

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by sasquatch View Post
                  Somebody in my area put this Lark on a Bronco II 4WD chassis.
                  Technically, that's not a Lark. It's a Cruiser. The wheelbase is four inches longer than a Lark.
                  "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                  Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                  Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                  '33 Rockne 10,
                  '51 Commander Starlight,
                  '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                  '56 Sky Hawk

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
                    Technically, that's not a Lark. It's a Cruiser. The wheelbase is four inches longer than a Lark.
                    "Technically" you are both correct and incorrect. The car is a 1963 Cruiser, not a Lark model. The 1963 Cruiser has a 113 inch wheelbase, the same as a 1963 Lark four door sedan.
                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    SDC member since 1968
                    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X