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  • #31
    I have had collector plates on various vehicles for over 30 years. (south west Ohio). I have had no hassles and been told by my insurance company that even driving to work on a nice day is acceptable. Have been out at 2am in morning and still no hassles even if driving home from work (talked to one Ohio State patrolman on way home ). I do carry my collector plates under seat and run 1 1946 tag on rear. Also carry the copy of law saying I can run 1 plate in case of being questioned.(law states if only 1 year plate was issued ,ok to run 1 on rear.)
    Last edited by rodnutrandy; 05-30-2012, 10:33 AM. Reason: Correction
    Randy Wilkin
    1946 M5 Streetrod
    Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

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    • #32
      In New Jersey its $50 for QQ Historic plates. Registration is for three years. After that you get the renewal every three years and its no charge. Just sent both my renewals in had 0 as fee. Plus no restrictions on driving.

      Basically you abide by your insurance companies restrictions.

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      • #33
        In Maryland (as in most other states) historic tags are much cheaper than regular issue plates.It's the only way to go with my 'oldies'.My '92 Crapparo qualified for historic tags this year, and I was in line at the MVA bright and early on January 3rd.The kicker/sticker/*icker is INSURANCE.As long as I have the Crapparo insured as a regular driver,it dosen't make a BoDiddley what kind of tags I display.I can drive any day of the week, drive to work, etc.When I went to Carlisle, I talked to a rep from my 'antique' insurance company and she said they won't insure anything newer than an '85. I carry 'collector/ antique' insurance on the Daytona and for the most part I adhere to the restrictions and limitations of that policy.After all, why do you think they charge for a year's coverage what my everyday insurer charges for a month?(I think that came out right.) I have taken my Studes and my '68 Chevelle (when I had it) to work but I'll admit that I was nervous as all get-out.I just drove sensibly and I didn't get messed with, passing both County and State police along the way.

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        • #34
          ""In New Jersey its $50 for QQ Historic plates. Registration is for three years. After that you get the renewal every three years and its no charge. Just sent both my renewals in had 0 as fee. Plus no restrictions on driving. "". Incorrect ~~~NJ clearly has restrictions

          • Owned as a collector’s item
          • Used solely for exhibition or educational purposes
          • Cannot be altered from the manufacturer’s original design in any way
          • Equipped for legal operation on NJ roadways

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          • #35
            Wow, just looked at PA laws too... as I am in the process of getting the 40 road ready... I was NOT pleased. It has the standard mumbo jumbo anout parades and shows, etc.... but, it does say you can drive it one day a week.... like a normal vehicle? I was told the PA cops are pretty lenient so long as it isn't an "every day" thing. I am holding out for a new category called "pre-war", LOL!!! It is disturbing to me that cars I drove in high school are now "antiguqes".... <sigh>

            Here is what we have:

            Antique Plates
            PennDOT offers three types of special plates for older vehicles:

            Antique plates are for vehicles more than 25 years old that are in a condition similar to the original specifications, either through maintenance or restoration. Replicas are not permitted.
            Classic plates are for vehicles at least 15 years old that are in a condition similar to the original specifications, either through maintenance or restoration. Replicas are not permitted.
            Collectible plates are for reconstructed vehicles that have undergone significant alterations to the original specifications, but have still been maintained in a collectible condition.

            To qualify for any of these plates, the vehicle must be primarily used for antique exhibitions, parades, and related activities. The vehicle may be driven one day a week for routine transportation use.

            The plates cost $75, and there's also a $22.50 certificate of title fee. These are one-time fees, as the plates are permanent and remain valid for the life of the vehicle, provided there's no change in ownership.

            No matter which plate you request, you must complete the antique/classic plate application. The rest of the application procedure varies according to the type of plate, but specific instructions are clearly provided on the form.
            Last edited by new2drive; 05-31-2012, 04:07 AM.

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            • #36
              As far as NJ rules I brought my car for my own use. Can drive for pleasure as long as its within your ins guidelines. Drove past my police dept while I was restoring it for three years with no bumpers no lenses only front and rear window plates tied with wire wraps.

              Had quite a few police cars in front and behind me both city and Passaic County. Never got pulled over. It would be up to the officer to prove what the guidlines were for an Avanti.

              There may be rules but a few cops told me they leave drivers of QQ plates alone because theyre safer drivers than everyone else and they understand that the cars are being restored. Besides they can write enough tickets for the idiots texting and on cell phones.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by rusty65 View Post
                In Maryland (as in most other states) historic tags are much cheaper than regular issue plates.It's the only way to go with my 'oldies'.My '92 Crapparo qualified for historic tags this year, and I was in line at the MVA bright and early on January 3rd.The kicker/sticker/*icker is INSURANCE.As long as I have the Crapparo insured as a regular driver,it dosen't make a BoDiddley what kind of tags I display.I can drive any day of the week, drive to work, etc.When I went to Carlisle, I talked to a rep from my 'antique' insurance company and she said they won't insure anything newer than an '85. I carry 'collector/ antique' insurance on the Daytona and for the most part I adhere to the restrictions and limitations of that policy.After all, why do you think they charge for a year's coverage what my everyday insurer charges for a month?(I think that came out right.) I have taken my Studes and my '68 Chevelle (when I had it) to work but I'll admit that I was nervous as all get-out.I just drove sensibly and I didn't get messed with, passing both County and State police along the way.
                When the Maryland Historic Vehicle law was passed in the early 1970s, it was considered a model statute and included many innovative provisions, like allowing orphan, low-production, prototype, and specially built show cars to qualify for the plates at only 15 years old. Others had to be 25 years old. George Hamlin of SDC was the chairman of the group that drafted the law and continued to serve as an advisory group to the DMV/BMVS on what vehicles would qualify for the exemption. Over the years, most of that specialized language was removed and the age requirement was lowered to 20 years. That has opened the door to abusers who register vehicles as historic just to save money on the registration fee. I recently saw a early-90s dump truck from a landscaping company with Maryland historic plates loading mulch at a Home Depot.

                The state police have been complaining about these abuses, and legislation was introduced earlier this year that would have greatly tightened usage restrictions and returned the age requirement to 25 years. Here’s a quote from the SEMA Action Network newsletter for April 2012:

                “A story that began with Maryland legislation that sought to severely curtail hobbyist rights, ended with an army of angry state hobbyists taking steps to protect enjoyment of vintage vehicles. As introduced, Maryland House Bill 550 and Senate Bill 846 aimed to further limit the use of historic motor vehicles, beyond what is currently provided for in the law. According to bill sponsors, these bills sought to address abuses of the historic vehicle designation by certain historic vehicle owners. Under the introduced bills, the age requirement would have been raised from 20 to at least 25 years old, historic cars would have been prohibited from being used for “occasional transportation” and an historic vehicle, show vehicle or antique insurance policy would have been required. While the SEMA Action Network (SAN) does not approve of the misuse of reasonable collector car laws, imposing new, unfair limitations became grounds for debate. So, the SAN went to work. In partnership with the hobbyist community in the state, the SAN worked with Delegate Kirill Reznik to propose amendments to H.B. 550 to protect legitimate historic vehicle owners. These amendments were also offered to S.B. 846 for Senate committee consideration.

                Under the amendments, which have not yet been formally approved, vehicles would continue to be eligible for the historic class upon their 20th year; there would be no collector insurance requirement and the “occasional use” provision would be restored. Further, permissible use would now include “for the purposes of obtaining repairs and routine maintenance.” The SAN also helped increase the classes of vehicles among those eligible for historic status to include taxi cabs, funeral vehicles, ambulances and limousines. The American Truck Historical Society successfully negotiated separate legislation to address historic trucks over 10,000 lbs.

                To address abusers of the current law who may be using the historic status to operate daily drivers without constraints, the proposed amendments to H.B. 550 and S.B. 846 require that an historic vehicle owner must have use of a regularly registered vehicle to be used for primary transportation. The bill would also clearly stipulate that the historic vehicle not be “an individual’s or a family’s primary method or transportation.” Further, the amended bills enhance law enforcement authority to target violators of the historic vehicle laws without inconveniencing legitimate hobbyists.”

                No action was taken on either the original or the amended bill during the 2012 legislative session, but the issue will be taken up again next year.
                Skip Lackie

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                  Washington collector vehicle plates...
                  jack
                  I seem to recall when I got my first CV plates (Betsy and Baby- in sequence) that there was a milage restriction as well. But since there is no annual renewal- there's no way for them to tell. It was some crazy low numer too- something like 1500 miles? In the first month the plate was on Baby I drove her from Los Angeles to Jacksonville, Florida. A few years later the NAVY transfered me back to the West Coast, so I had to drive her back- by way of South Bend...
                  Do that math!!!
                  These days most of my cars have 'CV' plates, and my current driver has a 'personal' plate~





                  Originally posted by JBOYLE View Post
                  The only time I ever got pulled over by a cop for plates is when I had a "P-51" plate on a Mustang. I was asked by a cop if I owned one. I was tempted to say.."If I could afford a P-51 Mustang, I'd have a better car than this."
                  That's too funny!!!
                  StudeDave '57
                  US Navy (retired)

                  3rd Generation Stude owner/driver
                  SDC Member since 1985

                  past President
                  Whatcom County Chapter SDC
                  San Diego Chapter SDC

                  past Vice President
                  San Diego Chapter SDC
                  North Florida Chapter SDC

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                  • #39
                    A lot of you live in states where Historic plates are a great benefit. I don't. I reside in New York State.
                    Historic registration is $53.75 per year. In some counties, like here in Dutchess, there is an extra annual charge $25 for the MTA (to subsidize mass transit riders). The plates cost an extra $25 on top of that $78.75 that you have to pay every year.
                    Regular use plates for a Studebaker (registration cost is by weight) ranges from about $45 to $55 plus $10-$20 surcharge plus $25 for plates. I just renewed Cathy's PT Cruiser for two years. It cost $113.50. If I selected the new plates, it would have been $158.50. This is for regular plates on a car that weighs 3288 pounds.
                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    SDC member since 1968
                    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                    • #40
                      @Skip Lackie,you are correct in saying there is abuse of historic tags in Maryland, especially with the advent of the year change from 25 to 20 years. (BTW my '66 Commander was considered historic in 1983.) There is a sudden increase of what I call historic 'daily drivers',usually imports.The owners are usually young people who use these vehicles as their primary mode of transportation.Before all the haters come out, we were all young once and started out with next to nothing.I don't mind anybody trying to save a few bucks (especially in Maryland), but when you get these tags just to bypass a State inspection, you're putting lives in potential danger.Also, it gives the rest of us in the hobby a bad name.

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                      • #41
                        The standard, dumb ol' white California plates on Barney cost me $59 per year. I have a set of black YOM-appropriate plates I was going to put on, but judging by the entries here, it may not be fiscally feasible!

                        Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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