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    Post deleted
    Last edited by 64V19816; 05-25-2012, 05:51 PM.

  • #2
    Did you a take a picture, it would be nice to see what they are like ...
    sigpic
    John
    63R-2386
    Resto-Mod by Michael Myer

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    • #3
      Also, do you have a NAPA part number? I'd like to take a look at one of the kits.

      Sounds like it worked out great!

      --Scott

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      • #4
        Rear or front?
        PackardV8

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        • #5
          I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but the rear crossmember where the upper shock mounts, isn't up to the task of carrying the weight of the car. When you add coil overloads, it stresses the attaching points, particularly the rivets, at the main frame rails. I have seen where the whole bottom plate is cracked all the way accross the frame. (starting at the crossmember rivets.)
          You could fish plate the bottom of the shock crossmember, and box it in and weld it solid to the frame rail on either side.
          It may have been others bad luck, but I have seen it more than once.
          Bez Auto Alchemy
          573-318-8948
          http://bezautoalchemy.com


          "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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          • #6
            Yep. What Brad [bezhawk] said.

            You don't want that flimsy crossmember above the rear axle doing any more work than its original assignment. BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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            • #7
              Beg to differ Guys! I can understand how coil-over rear shocks may tear apart a thin, rusted frame. But if a properly installed pair is going to rip the shock crossmember out of a solid Studebaker frame,
              I think We all better park our cars!!!!

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              • #8
                Shock absorbers (and their mounts) are designed to stop the oscillation of the suspension components.
                The mounts never were designed to support the weight of the vehicle.
                Sure, you can do it, and get away with it...... most of the time.
                But it is a band-aid fix for a problem not attended to in another area.
                I have bent the lower spring plate, and bent the upper crossmember on a good frame, so these guys are telling you the truth.
                I did mine with air shocks, big wheels and tires, and a trunkload of crap, four people, and 90 pounds of air.
                Had to work to find the limit, but that's exactly what I did.
                Your experience may vary, but shared experience is the most inexpensive information one can gain from.


                Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
                Beg to differ Guys! I can understand how coil-over rear shocks may tear apart a thin, rusted frame. But if a properly installed pair is going to rip the shock crossmember out of a solid Studebaker frame,
                I think We all better park our cars!!!!
                HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                Jeff


                Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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                • #9
                  To: DEEPNHOCK,----- I get what Your saying, although I ran rear air shocks on a '62 solid axle Corvette for three years without problems (everyday driver). I guess You just have to understand they're limitations.

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