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From the Archives #104 (Studebaker Power House)

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  • From the Archives #104 (Studebaker Power House)

    http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/e...g?t=1337668212

    Also known as Building 74, constructed in 1917 with additions in 1918, 1923, 1940 and 1945. This photo from 1926. Located north of Sample Street just west of the old Newman Altman Standard Surplus Building. It provided power for the entire plant. Razed in the mid 1970s.
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  • #2
    Richard,
    Do you know if this was a coal fired power plant or fuel oil or something else. the tower at the end of the building looks like a bag house for collecting exaust dust.

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    • #3
      Richard: We've been going to SB since 1968 and I don't remember that building still standing. Are you sure on your mid 70's date? stupak

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      • #4
        Coal-fired; lots of it!

        I, too, wondered about the 1970s demolition. 'Figured I don't remember it from the early 1960s, either, because there was no "car" stuff going on there and so 'would have had little reason to even notice it! <GGG> BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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        • #5
          It was torn down about 1974. That was before my Studebaker days. I was riding by on my motorcycle and parked to investigate. I remember there was a crane hook that was one of the biggest you'll ever see. We returned with our cars to load up on bricks to build an outside barbeque.

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          • #6
            It was 1974. I know that for fact.
            Chris Dresbach

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            • #7
              It was 1974. I know that for fact.

              As if you remember 1974. Your parents might.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Tom B View Post
                It was 1974. I know that for fact.

                As if you remember 1974. Your parents might.
                That's how I know...
                Chris Dresbach

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                • #9
                  I grew up about 6 miles south of Sample Street. I can still hear the whistle blow at 3:20 shift change from my back porch. I remember the sound of the steam trains pulling out of Union Station. Oh the memorys never to be lived again. Jim

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                  • #10
                    I just checked and the Power House was razed in 1972.
                    Richard Quinn
                    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
                      I just checked and the Power House was razed in 1972.
                      Our first trip to South Bend was in 1973 after the Colorado Springs Meet & I did not see that Power House so I figure Dick is spot on.

                      \"QUIGLEY DOWN UNDER\"
                      MELBOURNE.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
                        I just checked and the Power House was razed in 1972.
                        Interesting, Dick.

                        'Talk about focus: I have vivid memories of many of the places George and I visited while "Summer Sleuthing in South Bend," as he titled his Turning Wheels article years ago...but simply don't remember looking at anything as obviously huge and so dominating of the landscape as was The Power Plant.

                        'Probably glanced over there a time or two to see what Studebakers were in the employee parking lot, but had no occassion to nose around the place, or even pay any attention at all to it, because nothing was coming out of it that said Studebaker on it. BP
                        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                        Ayn Rand:
                        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                        Comment

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