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  • StudeDave57
    replied
    Originally posted by Lark Novice View Post
    I do have the shop manual
    That is SOOOOO refreshing to read!!!

    Lately it seems way too many folks have not done so,
    and I just have to wonder why?

    After buying an old Studebaker- step number one needs to be purchasing the books one will no doubt have to have to keep their 'new' Stude on the road for years to come. The shop manual and both parts books (body and chassis) are a must have to help keep you out of trouble.

    Good luck with the Lark- looks like you've got a nice one there!!!




    StudeDave '57

    Leave a comment:


  • Lark Novice
    replied
    Originally posted by jackb View Post
    if you don't have a shop manual, you'll likely miss a zerk fitting or 2. This would be a nice You Tube video: Greasing Your Studebaker
    I do have the shop manual so I should be able to follow it-- with 203,000 miles on the car, who knows when it was last done-- I'm looking forward to the adventure

    Leave a comment:


  • 52-fan
    replied
    Lots of enthusiastic and knowledgeable people and only a few sore heads. As I have said before, SDC: Come for the cars, stay for the people.
    Last edited by 52-fan; 05-17-2012, 06:54 AM.

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  • jackb
    replied
    if you don't have a shop manual, you'll likely miss a zerk fitting or 2. This would be a nice You Tube video: Greasing Your Studebaker
    Last edited by jackb; 05-16-2012, 03:58 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • warrlaw1
    replied
    This forum is so helpful. I think of these guys everytime I take mine out for a romp. It's like having a pit crew.

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Be sure to grease ALL of the chassis fittings. There are MANY.

    Leave a comment:


  • JimC
    replied
    Originally posted by Lark Novice View Post
    Hello Stude experts. I just successfully mounted and wired a 61 Lark clock where my clock delete plate used to be, and I am tickled to death! I could never have succeeded without the numerous threads on the Forum teaching me what brackets, bezels, wiring, bulbs, etc. I needed, as well as teaching me how to use a wiring diagram to find what to hook up where. Also, a thread taught me how to remove the headlamp switch and where to attach the wires, all-the-while reminding me to disconnect the battery prior to working on the wiring.

    Anyway, I just wanted to say I appreciate the experts who photograph their work to help out us newbies.

    Next week I change the oil, filters, and grease the Lark for the first time. (I've always gone to Jiffy Lube since I was 18 years old-- never had to do it myself before).

    I think I'll go out to the garage again to watch the clock hands move now. Thanks again
    I agree wholeheartedly. I would go as far to say that this forum is an essential tool in the modern Stude owner's toolkit. It connects anyone who wants to learn about Studes with hundreds of experts, almost instantly. I wouldn't have been able to move my sedan without the help of 41 Frank. Heck, I wouldn't have had the sedan to start with were it not for Jeff T. And having all the brainpower on tap from some of the best contributors to Turning Wheels (or the Stude world in general) like Bob Palma or Richard Quinn has not only helped me understand my car, but it's educated and excited me about a more diverse collection than I very likely would not have discovered on my own. Even this last week, when I was looking at picking up a '63, I not only got some great advice from people on the vehicle's issues, I also got to have dialog with the current owner right here on the forum!

    And I could go on and on about all the people I've learned from, or all the new friends I've made. In the end though, I am a Studebaker owner, soon to be an owner of a running Studebaker, and that probably wouldn't have been possible without resources like Turning Wheels and this forum. Someone on this forum once thanked me for "saving another one" regarding my Lark project. From my perspective, I'm the guy holding the wrench, but I feel like this forum is what's saving that car. Every time I come on here, ask a really easy or dumb question, and someone patiently takes my hand and teaches me something, it makes it possible for me to work on my car(s).

    This site, and Turning Wheels. If I had a nickel for everything I've learned from those two sources alone, I'd be the proud proprietor of a very large pile of nickels.
    Last edited by JimC; 05-16-2012, 05:13 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Peanut
    replied
    So glad to hear of your success! Keep it going!

    Leave a comment:


  • JGK 940
    replied
    Excellent! Congratulations and welcome aboard.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lark Novice
    started a topic This Forum is teaching me something!

    This Forum is teaching me something!

    Hello Stude experts. I just successfully mounted and wired a 61 Lark clock where my clock delete plate used to be, and I am tickled to death! I could never have succeeded without the numerous threads on the Forum teaching me what brackets, bezels, wiring, bulbs, etc. I needed, as well as teaching me how to use a wiring diagram to find what to hook up where. Also, a thread taught me how to remove the headlamp switch and where to attach the wires, all-the-while reminding me to disconnect the battery prior to working on the wiring.

    Anyway, I just wanted to say I appreciate the experts who photograph their work to help out us newbies.

    Next week I change the oil, filters, and grease the Lark for the first time. (I've always gone to Jiffy Lube since I was 18 years old-- never had to do it myself before).

    I think I'll go out to the garage again to watch the clock hands move now. Thanks again
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