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Beautiful Speedster on BaT

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  • JimC
    replied
    Originally posted by Pat Dilling View Post
    Some of Mikey's comments have truth to them however. Over the next 10-20 years we are going to see a "changing of the guard" over what we generally considered classic vehicles. What the value does will remain to be seen. Many of our cars will outlive us as they outlived previous owners. Original cars will become increasingly less practical and expensive to drive and more difficult to maintain. There are a couple generations already that have never been in a car without airbags or driven a car with a carburetor. I'm not trying to be a doomsday messenger, but I am a realist. My plan is to enjoy them as much as I can and to share and promote them to those who are interested.
    I can agree with that. The thing I can't get off my mind is that there are less Studebakers out there every year. Sometimes it's for a good cause, such as becoming a parts car so that another car can get back on the road. Other times, it's that a car is deemed "undesirable" by today's standards, and it's crushed even though minimal work could bring it back. Like someone said, "even 4 doors are starting to sell". As more of the undesirables die a premature death, they might ironically become more desirable.

    My mom is a fishing fanatic, and today we were talking about failed business ventures based out of South Bend Indiana. Interestingly enough, at the dawn of the 20th century, South Bend Lures began making all sorts of fishing lures. Their last days were fairly close to those of the South Bend plant, interestingly enough. My mom was telling me about one particular South Bend Lure that sold for tens of thousands of dollars at auction not too long ago. What made it so valuable was that they were seen as cheap and replacable when new, and so most all of them had been thrown out, long lost to time. Yet today, finding one is a prize to antique lure collectors.

    I have high hopes that long after I'm gone, someone will see my cars and say "wow, I want that." But I can't control the future, so for now I know that I like them and because of that I'll keep working on 'em.

    Leave a comment:


  • SN-60
    replied
    Like I mentioned on another Thread recently, the days of a twenty-five thousand dollar ceiling for Studebaker's rarer models are long gone......like it or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • studefan
    replied
    The Speedster is up to $42,600 with 2 hr and 50 min to go.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Stude...ht_5907wt_1165

    Leave a comment:


  • kurtruk
    replied
    And to think I could have discovered that Packard Hawk in San Miguel. Always intended to drive through, snooping for old cars. Bet I woulda found it. Dang. Now the "town" of Bradley has a few interesting things sitting around...

    Leave a comment:


  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    Originally posted by Pat Dilling View Post
    Some of Mikey's comments have truth to them however. Over the next 10-20 years we are going to see a "changing of the guard" over what we generally considered classic vehicles. What the value does will remain to be seen. Many of our cars will outlive us as they outlived previous owners. Original cars will become increasingly less practical and expensive to drive and more difficult to maintain. There are a couple generations already that have never been in a car without airbags or driven a car with a carburetor. I'm not trying to be a doomsday messenger, but I am a realist. My plan is to enjoy them as much as I can and to share and promote them to those who are interested.
    Nice, Pat

    I don't think my generation (I'm 64) tried to enjoy the same things in the same way my father's generation did. I don't expect my kids and grand kids to do exactly the same as I did (and do)...at least I hope not

    As Pat says...let's not worry that other folks and other generations may or may not enjoy Studebakers the same way we do (if at all). If they are fun for us, that's good enough.

    Leave a comment:


  • SN-60
    replied
    To: Pat Dilling,-----Well said!

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  • Pat Dilling
    replied
    Some of Mikey's comments have truth to them however. Over the next 10-20 years we are going to see a "changing of the guard" over what we generally considered classic vehicles. What the value does will remain to be seen. Many of our cars will outlive us as they outlived previous owners. Original cars will become increasingly less practical and expensive to drive and more difficult to maintain. There are a couple generations already that have never been in a car without airbags or driven a car with a carburetor. I'm not trying to be a doomsday messenger, but I am a realist. My plan is to enjoy them as much as I can and to share and promote them to those who are interested.

    Leave a comment:


  • clonelark
    replied
    Also a very beautiful 58 Packard Hardtop here.
    http://braunson.files.wordpress.com/...tion183-vi.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by clonelark View Post
    If you thought the comments were good under the Speedster, look at the comments under the Packard Hawk.
    http://bringatrailer.com/2011/08/22/...awk-barn-find/
    Right, Bob. There seems to be an ever-increasing number of automotive history "experts" as the years roll on. BP

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan White
    replied
    My 10 year old son and I drove Marvin ('57 Broadmoor) to his Cub Scout family campout a couple of weekends ago. You should have seen the kids and Dads all over it. Several wanted their pictures taken with it or in it. Yep Mikey is right no one under 30 would like these old cars.

    Leave a comment:


  • clonelark
    replied
    If you thought the comments were good under the Speedster, look at the comments under the Packard Hawk.
    http://bringatrailer.com/2011/08/22/...awk-barn-find/

    Leave a comment:


  • PlainBrownR2
    replied
    I especially liked the comment "Mikey" made that he'd be shocked if there's a 30 year old out there who would want this car. I can think of a 31 year old I see in the mirror every morning who would die for a car like this, and I think there are a few much younger ones on this forum who feel similarly.
    Let's see, parents had a 55 Champion 4 door sedan. I grew up around the 55 Commander hardtop as our show car, that we had since I was in 5th grade. Picked up a similar 55 Commander hardtop for a parts car, that is now my FI project. I grew up around the 55 Champions, Commanders, Presidents, and Speedsters I'm 30 years old now, but to want a Speedster, now what 30 year old would be willing to go for that??

    (Of course I'd love to have one. What can I say, it's that tri tone grey-salmon-white colors, that redesigned dash, and that extra trim)

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by JimC View Post
    I especially liked the comment "Mikey" made that he'd be shocked if there's a 30 year old out there who would want this car. I can think of a 31 year old I see in the mirror every morning who would die for a car like this, and I think there are a few much younger ones on this forum who feel similarly.
    Absolutely, Jim. "Mikey" hasn't been around much, it would appear. BP

    Leave a comment:


  • JimC
    replied
    Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
    Note some of the "discussion" about the collector car market and people and such in the Comments section under the listing. Interesting and amusing. BP
    I especially liked the comment "Mikey" made that he'd be shocked if there's a 30 year old out there who would want this car. I can think of a 31 year old I see in the mirror every morning who would die for a car like this, and I think there are a few much younger ones on this forum who feel similarly.

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Note some of the "discussion" about the collector car market and people and such in the Comments section under the listing. Interesting and amusing. BP

    Leave a comment:

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