Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hauled Lark number two home today.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hauled Lark number two home today.

    Thanks to Frank (41Frank), Jeff (Jeff T.), and John (not sure if he posts here!) I got my new Lark sedan home today to begin the restoration process. We had a great time, even with having to pull the car sideways with flat tires on a dirt floor. She's a dusty old beast, that much is for sure! I'm going to clean her up a bit tomorrow and maybe get some pictures of the current interior condition. There are also lots more pictures and video from today on my blog, here. All in all, it's a pretty solid car.









    (Apologies for the video quality! I didn't think to bring a real camera, and my cell phone isn't the greatest, but it works!)

    The front clip (from a '61 Champ pickup) was not bolted to the car. Fortunately Frank's tow straps did the trick.

    Thanks to everyone who helped. I really appreciated the good times had by all.
    Last edited by JimC; 05-09-2012, 11:29 PM.
    '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

    "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

  • #2
    When Showbizkid finishes updating the forum, the pics should show up. In the mean time, here they are:
    Attached Files
    Last edited by JimC; 05-09-2012, 11:28 PM.
    '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

    "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

    Comment


    • #3
      Always good to hear about another Studebaker coming back into the light. What I see in the pictures looks promising. Good luck on your project.
      sigpic

      "In the heart of Arkansas."
      Searcy, Arkansas
      1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
      1952 2R pickup

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks! I spent most of the day pulling parts out of the car, dusting it off, and checking out the prior repair work. There are some holes in the floor that got fixed with pretty thin grade (sort of looks like roofing tin) stuff many years ago. It's lived inside since the fix, so there's no rust on it, but I still might swap it out for a floorpan from Classic Enterprises just for the sake of getting the original look. On the flip side, I'm not aiming for "show car", and it doesn't seem to oilcan when you put weight on it, so who knows?

        Can anyone answer this: Aside from calling a locksmith, can I get the trunk open without a key?The interior is completely removed, so I can get into the trunk (let me rephrase that - someone with a smaller girth and greater flexibility than myself can get in the trunk), but I'm not sure if the latch locks to prevent being released accidentally from within. Education in this area would be greatly appreciated.
        '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

        "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

        Comment


        • #5
          You can trip the trunk release from inside Jim. Glad you are happy with the new aquisition. It was fun going on a road trip to retrieve your Lark, although it was a bit of a challenge to extricate it from its hiding place! Luckily there were four of us. The winch was a big plus too. John is not on the Forum but his last name is Caskey. He is my partner in our Studebaker vending venture named Howards Parts.

          ps: I found no ticks on me, while John had two,not unusual since I have not encountered any since I was a little kid playing in the woods on our acreage. Something about them not liking my blood I think. <GGG>
          Last edited by 41 Frank; 05-10-2012, 07:27 PM.
          Frank van Doorn
          Omaha, Ne.
          1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
          1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
          1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

          Comment


          • #6
            Jim,

            It IS roofing tin My uncle with decades of body/fender experience told me to use it back in the day... in retrospect not the brightest idea ever My mea culpa is that at the time I was 19 and didn't know squat.

            As best as I can recall, that Lark has been setting in that barn for at least 25 years. I bought it at a salvage yard auction in 1979 worked on it some and put it away. I am glad that you can use it

            I did not pick up any ticks either but I know there is a pretty good crop of them this year

            Jeff T.
            \"I\'m getting nowhere as fast as I can\"
            The Replacements.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jeff T. View Post
              Jim,

              It IS roofing tin My uncle with decades of body/fender experience told me to use it back in the day... in retrospect not the brightest idea ever My mea culpa is that at the time I was 19 and didn't know squat.

              As best as I can recall, that Lark has been setting in that barn for at least 25 years. I bought it at a salvage yard auction in 1979 worked on it some and put it away. I am glad that you can use it

              I did not pick up any ticks either but I know there is a pretty good crop of them this year

              Jeff T.
              John must have been the only attractive one to the ticks. I managed to escape without picking up any hitchhikers myself.

              I think what really saved that car was that all the soft bedding material (i.e. the interior) was out. In my grandpa's, most of the worst rust damage came from the mouse waste when they took bits of the seat padding and made nests in every crevice they could find. I found some mouse tracks and droppings cleaning it out today, but no burroughs or other damage, so I'm excited about that.

              It was definitely a team effort getting that beast out. Without your come-alongs and Frank's winch, we'd still be there scratching our heads. (Well, I speak too soon. I’d still be there if left to my own devices. You guys would have figured something out!).

              As far as that floor goes, hey, it's still way better than my other Lark. It shouldn't be too hard to patch in something a little thicker. I did like your access port for the brake cylinder though.
              '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

              "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

              Comment


              • #8
                Now; to get that Stude to tickover (British for engine idling)...............
                --------------------------------------

                Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

                Comment


                • #9
                  That will be a great day. The motor it's sporting now (A champ from the early 50's) is pretty picked apart, so I'm probably not going to be using it. In my ideal, pie-in-the-sky world, I'd find someone with a spare 289 and a mated transmission just wasting space in their garage and looking to get rid of it for something a young broke guy could afford. Realistically, I have an operable '62 6 cyl OHV that's been offered my way, which would get it to the first milestone I'm looking for (starting) fairly quickly. Then I just need to get it to stop
                  '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

                  "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JimC View Post
                    can I get the trunk open without a key?The interior is completely removed, so I can get into the trunk.
                    From inside the car use a flashlight, a ratchet, a couple of long extensions and a 7/16, maybe 1/2", (I forget) wobble socket . If your wobble socket is loose and wobbles too much, wrap it with electrical tape. Remove the striker for the trunk latch (only two bolts). I've used this procedure many, many times 'cause I've never liked crawling in trunks that have been closed for umpteen years.
                    Jerry Forrester
                    Forrester's Chrome
                    Douglasville, Georgia

                    See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Perhaps start with brakes then worry about an engine, am sure some nice SDC member will have just what you require. From the description of its resting place its been "Ticking Over" for years (sorry, LOL).
                      John Clements
                      Christchurch, New Zealand

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Jerry,

                        Thanks for the idea. It's amazing how easy it is to miss something so painfully obvious! I have so many ratchet extenders that I hardly had to reach into the trunk at all to take care of that. It's a 7/16 socket, by the way. Figuring out which socket was actually really easy, since I have the hardtop in the garage across the aisle. I posted some more pics from the trunk in my blog as well. It really looks pretty good in there.

                        John,

                        Starting and stopping are actually kind of progressing at the same time. I definitely want to have something in place to stop the car when I do get the motor going. Either way, it's a lot of work yet. I have a 44 Twin Traction rear end that I want to swap out with the one in here (a 27), and a few other fun little projects to work on, so it's going to be a while yet before I need an engine.
                        '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

                        "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X