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From the archives #98 (Administration Building NYC 20th Century Limited)

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  • From the archives #98 (Administration Building NYC 20th Century Limited)

    http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/e...g?t=1335333354
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  • #2
    That is MASSIVELY cool, Richard. Thank you for sharing!

    Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

    Comment


    • #3
      What in incredible photo. I checked the Amtrak schedule for comparison. The Lake Shore Limited leaves Penn Station in New York at 3:45 pm arrives at Union Station in Chicago 19 hours later. Three hours longer than the 20th Century Limited in 1938.
      Joe Roberts
      '61 R1 Champ
      '65 Cruiser
      Eastern North Carolina Chapter

      Comment


      • #4
        A thought-provoking photo, Richard. Wonder if the photographer uttered a "Wow!" when the first print emerged from the developing solutions?

        I wish I'd been born at the end of WWI - or maybe even at the turn of centuries prior to WWI. That would have had me growing up in an age of technology that one could fully comprehend. An age SO MUCH different than that which we're in now. The planes, trains and automobiles of that era are all comprehendible in every way. I'm not saying that progress isn't good - I am saying I know I don't have a snowball's chance next to a Hades heater of understanding all facets of hyper-sonic aircraft or a dual-core processor.
        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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        • #5
          One employee hanging out the window watching it go by.
          sigpic

          Home of the Fried Green Tomato

          "IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

          1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

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          • #6
            Thanks for posting this Dick!

            Also, I've taken my framed copy (c/o you) down from the wall, and I see that I was mistaken about "Otto."
            I was thinking of Carl Thompson's letter to the TW that identified the photographer as Carl Tuveson of the Studebaker Printing, Photographic and Mailing Division.

            Thanks again, Gary

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Roscomacaw View Post
              A thought-provoking photo, Richard. Wonder if the photographer uttered a "Wow!" when the first print emerged from the developing solutions?

              I wish I'd been born at the end of WWI - or maybe even at the turn of centuries prior to WWI. That would have had me growing up in an age of technology that one could fully comprehend. An age SO MUCH different than that which we're in now. The planes, trains and automobiles of that era are all comprehendible in every way. I'm not saying that progress isn't good - I am saying I know I don't have a snowball's chance next to a Hades heater of understanding all facets of hyper-sonic aircraft or a dual-core processor.
              My father lived from 1902 to 2006. I believe that he lived through an era like no other. He bought his first car in 1919 (a 1917 Model T) and was still driving after he was 100. My parents flew in planes in the 1920s (open cockpit) up to recent times.
              Gary L.
              Wappinger, NY

              SDC member since 1968
              Studebaker enthusiast much longer

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by studegary View Post
                My father lived from 1902 to 2006. I believe that he lived through an era like no other. He bought his first car in 1919 (a 1917 Model T) and was still driving after he was 100. My parents flew in planes in the 1920s (open cockpit) up to recent times.
                Quite a change they went through! My grandfather was born in 1886 and died in 1970, so he went from the horse and buggy to a man on the moon!
                Chip
                '63 Cruiser
                '57 Packard wagon
                '61 Lark Regal 4 dr wagon
                '50 Commander 4 dr sedan

                Comment


                • #9
                  I took Amtrak to New York City in 2010 and was in my sleeper compartment deliberately trying to stay awake to see the remains of the old Studebaker plant when we stopped for a short time in South Bend. I figured the stop would be next to the old train depot across the street from the plant. When we stopped nothing looked familiar. Where DOES Amtrak stop now in South Bend?

                  Studedude1961
                  Omaha, NE

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                  • #10
                    That old station has been closed for decades. The new one is out west of town.
                    Richard Quinn
                    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There is an interesting note on the 20th Century Limited. At this point in history, they were rivals with Pennsylvania Railroad. The timetables were so close to each other, that they would "race" each other from New York City to Chicago with their trains. The competition even comissioned a few paintings based on the two trains(lookup The Great Race). Anyway, what's interesting is even though Henry Dreyfuss designed the 20th Century Limited's engine and interiors for the passenger cars, Raymond Loewy designed the Pennsylvania Railroad's GG-1, that took the Pennsylvania's Broadway Limited from New York to Harrisburg, PA. He also designed the interiors and observation car on the Broadway Limited passenger cars. Loewy designed the Pennsylvania's Q2 and T1 as well, but I don't know if they ever pulled the Broadway Limited or not, since the train was usually handled by the K4's once they left Harrisburg.
                      Last edited by PlainBrownR2; 04-25-2012, 02:46 PM.
                      1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                      1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                      1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                      1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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                      • #12
                        SWEET PICTURE!!!!


                        Keep posting them please.
                        StudeDave '57
                        US Navy (retired)

                        3rd Generation Stude owner/driver
                        SDC Member since 1985

                        past President
                        Whatcom County Chapter SDC
                        San Diego Chapter SDC

                        past Vice President
                        San Diego Chapter SDC
                        North Florida Chapter SDC

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                        • #13
                          I love Richard's pictures!! Keep up the great work!

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                          • #14
                            Truly a wonderful picture, Dick; "says it all."

                            I'm intrigued by the reference to "track pans to take on water at speed."

                            'Never heard of them. How do they "work," you RR guys? Thanks. BP
                            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                            Ayn Rand:
                            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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                            • #15
                              The track pans were a neat piece of railroad equipment for the steam locomotives. The track pans were used on lines, such as Pennsylvania RR and NYC, where traffic volume was high, and the trains couldn't tie up operations by sitting at a water tower. They were pans set in the center of the track, with a water source and a pumphouse nearby to fill the pans. Rather than stop at a water tower to fill the tender, locomotives would lower a scoop on the bottom of the tender, at speed and while the locomotive was moving, and use that to refill the water tank in the tender. They had to be placed on a level surface, and it took a little bit of timing to get the necessary water into the tender. If the locomotive was too slow, the scoop couldn't pick up the water and load it into the tender. If the locomotive was too fast, it would spray water, coal chunks, and anything else into the leading passenger behind the locomotive, resulting in some very drenched and angry passengers. The tender needed to be vented so when the tank was filling, the air could be removed.
                              There were some issues with it. I couldn't be immediately used once a locomotive passed over it. When it got cold, the pans would freeze unless they were heated. They were also expensive to maintain.
                              The best example I can think of is they were set at points around the Horseshoe Curve on the Pennsylvania Railroad. NYC used them as well.
                              1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                              1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                              1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                              1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

                              Comment

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