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Royal Purple Oil?

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  • #16
    Using premium and/or synthetic oil in the rear is probably a good idea since it is rarely changed. On the other hand the oil in my ’50 Hudson rear and 3 speed trannie is the original from the factory! I use Amsoil in my ’08 Subaru STI as it is a high performance turbo charged engine and runs at high RPMs. I use Delo 15W40 in my Studes and Hudson engines as they are changed more often and do not have the requirements of my Subaru and also has a bit more zinc for the cam. If you are racing or have severe duty where you need the performance then Amsoil or RP is what you should use, but for an occasional driver it is way overkill and again it does nothing to protect your flat tappet cam. I am not saying there is anything wrong with RP, Amsoil, or any other high performance synthetic petroleum products, however it is a good idea to use the right product for the right application and in this case using RP in a Stude or old engine is probably not the best application. Again your money your car.
    Dan White
    64 R1 GT
    64 R2 GT
    58 C Cab
    57 Broadmoor (Marvin)

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    • #17
      A lot of good discussion both here, now, previously and all over the internet.

      My feeling in a nutshell. I don't know at what spring pressures, cam lift or other variables that ZDDP is necessary or if it is at all, But I'll tell you that in my flat tappet engines there will be the current oils that I can buy at my FLAPS on sale w/filter and a $10 bottle of ZDDP concentrate.

      With the oil change frequency that most of us have the $10 cost to not provide a data point on camshaft failure is money well spent in my book.

      Bob

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      • #18
        Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
        Yes, Royal Purple is a good oil.

        No, I've never found any brand name oil which which in the correct weight wouldn't safely and satisfactorily lubricate and protect a stock Studebaker engine. By any standards our engines are pretty agricultural. In normal driving, they don't put heavy loads on bearings or lifters. Maybe, since all major brand oils pass the same certification standards, just buy whatever is on sale at the local FLAPS.jack vines
        "Agricultural" seem like the best descript I have heard in awhile. If we treat them as such, don't overly complicate care & maintenance, and don't expect too much from them, they will run dependably forever.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
          Yes, Royal Purple is a good oil.

          No, I've never found any brand name oil which which in the correct weight wouldn't safely and satisfactorily lubricate and protect a stock Studebaker engine. By any standards our engines are pretty agricultural. In normal driving, they don't put heavy loads on bearings or lifters.

          Maybe, since all major brand oils pass the same certification standards, just buy whatever is on sale at the local FLAPS.

          jack vines

          Absolutely. There's so much misinformation on the net about motor oils and flat tappet engines. From what I've been able to determine from all the information...both good and bad...is that engines such as Studebaker designs are at no real risk. If any Stude engines are it would be the R- engines due to higher valve spring pressures.

          The entire controversy stems from unrelated but concurrent events...the EPA mandating lower ZDDP content in motor oils and substandard camshafts and lifters coming in from offshore. Many cams wiped and engine builders blamed it on the oil. Even then, the problem was pretty much confined to high performance engines with high valve spring pressures. For the most part it occurred more than not during break-in. Once the real problem was recognized and corrected it's really a non-issue but the myths and controversy lives on.

          There's no such thing as a mom and pop oil refinery...the motor oils today are far better than what was available when Studebaker was building cars. If today's motor oils are that bad for older engines, why aren't there old cars constantly blowing their engines? How many that do blow their engines doing it from poor maintenance or are simply worn out and being blamed on today's oils? I remember all the predictions of mass engine failures when unleaded gasoline was phased in...it didn't happen. Those that did were likely from poor maintenance or being worn out anyway.

          If one has a performance engine with high valve spring pressures and can't find motor oil with the necessary ZDDP, a container of STP or similar is all that's required. If you can find motor oils with the ZDDP, then no further additives are necessary.
          Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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