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  • #16
    Bob, it doesn't bother me to see those pieces going to the crusher. Now, if they were at my place, I'd save them, because I can. But I know your circumstances are different, and you don't have a lot of room to keep stuff with low demand for it.

    I have certainly hauled hulks to the crusher before, and will again. But pieces off them will live on in another car.

    With fuel close to $5 a gallon, driving 1500 miles one way, to fetch a body shell worth a few hundred dollars is a non-starter. I'm sure other folks did the same math, and that is why there wasn't a crowd at your door when you offered that stuff.
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Comment


    • #17
      I have to agree it is 'sad'. And, they should be saved - but how / where - can a location in the central USA be found and used? I certainly don't have the money to do that.

      On the other hand - he just made the existing stuff MORE VALUABLE. There is ONE LESS Studebaker Sedan body in the world, and one less pick up bed. Making what is left (no matter the condition) worth MORE!

      just my 2 cents.

      And, I am sure we all know of folks storing stuff outdoors to restore some day - they also are destroying / recycling Studebakers - and making the rest of the stuff worth more...

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by gordr View Post
        With fuel close to $5 a gallon, driving 1500 miles one way, to fetch a body shell worth a few hundred dollars is a non-starter. I'm sure other folks did the same math, and that is why there wasn't a crowd at your door when you offered that stuff.
        Just curious. If all of the rust had been cut out of that shell, replacement panels had been welded in by professionals and the body had been completely prepped, dents worked out, leaded where appropriate and completely flash prepped, coated inside with zinc chromate or whatever is the rage today and primed on the outside and was ready for painting, and you had a project where it was going to take you two or three years to get to that point, would you have been willing to make the trip and pay a fair price for that body instead of spending a couple of years sweating, cursing and toiling to get it to that point?
        Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
        Kenmore, Washington
        hausdok@msn.com

        '58 Packard Hawk
        '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
        '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
        '69 Pontiac Firebird
        (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

        Comment


        • #19
          Advertising, or lack of it is everything. There are only a handfull of 1950 4 dr owners on this forum, and another handfull that have cars that these parts would fit. The people that own them, don't always need the parts or want spares. I was not surprised to see the car get crushed.

          I have a few just like this one but I plan to use Local and National SDC ads, the forum and the swap page, ebay and CL before they meet the scrap pile. You can only do so much. The shop is only so big. You'll be sick of reading the same ad over and over until the parts sell or I decide to remove the last bits and haul them away. Move along.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by hausdok View Post
            Just curious. If all of the rust had been cut out of that shell, replacement panels had been welded in by professionals and the body had been completely prepped, dents worked out, leaded where appropriate and completely flash prepped, coated inside with zinc chromate or whatever is the rage today and primed on the outside and was ready for painting, and you had a project where it was going to take you two or three years to get to that point, would you have been willing to make the trip and pay a fair price for that body instead of spending a couple of years sweating, cursing and toiling to get it to that point?
            Absolutely, Mike. But you are talking about a whole lot of added value. I don't remember Bob having said anything about that body shell having had any work at all done to it, let alone been made almost as new.

            A used body shell, even one that may be nearly rust-free, still needs a lot of work to be ready for paint, if you are talking about a good restoration. Strip it, sand it, work ot the dents, seal the seams, seal it, prime it, sand it, rinse and repeat. Lots of hours on even a primo shell.

            If I could have gone to Bob's place and back, on a couple of tanks of fuel, I would have been there for those. I have been to Bob's place, and he is a fine gentleman, but even the finest among us can't save them all, especially when space issues and neighbors whinging about property values are in the mix.
            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

            Comment


            • #21
              With all due respect to Bob Peterson, I understand the point that Bob Andrews was trying to make, and I agree with it.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by gordr View Post
                Absolutely, Mike. But you are talking about a whole lot of added value. I don't remember Bob having said anything about that body shell having had any work at all done to it, let alone been made almost as new.

                A used body shell, even one that may be nearly rust-free, still needs a lot of work to be ready for paint, if you are talking about a good restoration. Strip it, sand it, work ot the dents, seal the seams, seal it, prime it, sand it, rinse and repeat. Lots of hours on even a primo shell.

                If I could have gone to Bob's place and back, on a couple of tanks of fuel, I would have been there for those. I have been to Bob's place, and he is a fine gentleman, but even the finest among us can't save them all, especially when space issues and neighbors whinging about property values are in the mix.
                So,

                If it had been a primo shell all ready to go, what would it have been worth? Let's get some ideas.
                Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
                Kenmore, Washington
                hausdok@msn.com

                '58 Packard Hawk
                '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
                '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
                '69 Pontiac Firebird
                (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by hausdok View Post
                  So,

                  If it had been a primo shell all ready to go, what would it have been worth? Let's get some ideas.
                  No much interest in it restored or project, now the front fenders, hood and all the rest of the parts that make up the front of a bullet nose car in perfect shape is a different story, those are the parts saved and once they are blasted and work to be perfect then ask what is a perfect bullet nose front end worth? I will have it so bring your check book when you come asking do you have this.
                  Candbstudebakers
                  Castro Valley,
                  California


                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Bob,
                    Thanks for the efforts you make in saving the cars and parts that you do.
                    It may be sad to see these cars get crushed for many people....then buy the car from you. You offer your stuff regularly and affordably and I appreciate all of your efforts. It makes me just as sad to see stuff sitting and just rusting and rotting away with no end in sight. Keep doing what you do my friend. People had their chance to save these cars.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Well,

                      Folks are still not tracking on my question. Bob is about a 33 hour round trip for me. When he first posted about that tub, it occurred to me that I might go pick it up, bring it back here, cut out any rot, weld up new panels, prep it and turn it around at a profit. When folks didn't jump on it, I figured that the reason was either because it's an unpopular model or because they know that if they did they'd double up the amount of work they have to do and add the expense of picking it up to boot, so that's why they weren't jumping on it.

                      I wondered what kind of interest there was in getting pristine tubs and what folks would be willing to pay for that. One can buy full replacement bodies for 55, 56, 57 Chevys, 47 - 52 Chevy trucks, Camaros, Mustangs and some Mopars. Some folks that are doing full restorations prefer to start with a clean and ready-to-go tub that they don't have to do any cutting, welding or major dent removal on, so they buy an off-the-shelf new shell and are happy to do so. Stude folks don't have that luxury.

                      Obviously, there aren't enough of you to justify one of these big stamping companies spending the money to make dies and put together the necessary process to make full stude bodies or there'd already be someone making them by now. So, when you have a rusty body you are faced with the daunting task of major rot repair or finding another tub that's got less rot to replace the one you've got. Either way, you've got major work in front of you. Some folks pretty much do it piece by piece over a long time and some turn the car over to guys like Kerry and have him attack the car full bore at once.

                      Over the past seven months that I've been hanging out here, I've seen a whole lot of folks welding up major rot in body tubs; some with great results and some with not-so-great results. What if there were a firm salvaging tubs, cutting out all of the rot and then welding in new metal, taking out all of the dents and prepping those bodies to the nines? What if a Stude owner who'd just picked up his field car and wants to restore it could trade in the old tub as a core and drive away with a perfect tub that's ready to go and save a couple of years of blood, sweat and tears and get his beloved restoration done one, two or three years quicker than he could have done it if he had to do the tub at home?

                      I'm looking to get into another business; something that doesn't put my life in danger on a daily basis like my current one, 'cuz I'm not getting any younger. I might be interested in doing something like that if I thought it was a viable business model; but I have to have an idea of what folks here think they'd be willing to pay for a ready-to-go tub, if they were to want to do that? Is one worth $3000, $5000, $7000, more.? That's what I'm trying to get a feel for. Don't bother to answer if you'll never even consider something like that, I'm only interested in hearing from the folks that think they'd be interested in doing that if/when they themselves are about to commence a restoration.
                      Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
                      Kenmore, Washington
                      hausdok@msn.com

                      '58 Packard Hawk
                      '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
                      '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
                      '69 Pontiac Firebird
                      (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by hausdok View Post
                        Well,

                        Folks are still not tracking on my question. Bob is about a 33 hour round trip for me. When he first posted about that tub, it occurred to me that I might go pick it up, bring it back here, cut out any rot, weld up new panels, prep it and turn it around at a profit. When folks didn't jump on it, I figured that the reason was either because it's an unpopular model or because they know that if they did they'd double up the amount of work they have to do and add the expense of picking it up to boot, so that's why they weren't jumping on it.

                        I wondered what kind of interest there was in getting pristine tubs and what folks would be willing to pay for that. One can buy full replacement bodies for 55, 56, 57 Chevys, 47 - 52 Chevy trucks, Camaros, Mustangs and some Mopars. Some folks that are doing full restorations prefer to start with a clean and ready-to-go tub that they don't have to do any cutting, welding or major dent removal on, so they buy an off-the-shelf new shell and are happy to do so. Stude folks don't have that luxury.

                        Obviously, there aren't enough of you to justify one of these big stamping companies spending the money to make dies and put together the necessary process to make full stude bodies or there'd already be someone making them by now. So, when you have a rusty body you are faced with the daunting task of major rot repair or finding another tub that's got less rot to replace the one you've got. Either way, you've got major work in front of you. Some folks pretty much do it piece by piece over a long time and some turn the car over to guys like Kerry and have him attack the car full bore at once.

                        Over the past seven months that I've been hanging out here, I've seen a whole lot of folks welding up major rot in body tubs; some with great results and some with not-so-great results. What if there were a firm salvaging tubs, cutting out all of the rot and then welding in new metal, taking out all of the dents and prepping those bodies to the nines? What if a Stude owner who'd just picked up his field car and wants to restore it could trade in the old tub as a core and drive away with a perfect tub that's ready to go and save a couple of years of blood, sweat and tears and get his beloved restoration done one, two or three years quicker than he could have done it if he had to do the tub at home?

                        I'm looking to get into another business; something that doesn't put my life in danger on a daily basis like my current one, 'cuz I'm not getting any younger. I might be interested in doing something like that if I thought it was a viable business model; but I have to have an idea of what folks here think they'd be willing to pay for a ready-to-go tub, if they were to want to do that? Is one worth $3000, $5000, $7000, more.? That's what I'm trying to get a feel for. Don't bother to answer if you'll never even consider something like that, I'm only interested in hearing from the folks that think they'd be interested in doing that if/when they themselves are about to commence a restoration.
                        Only a small handful of people are restoring a '50 Champion 4 door. If it were a pristine '53 Starliner tub, it might be a different situation.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          You're still not getting it. It doesn't have to be a 50 Champion 4-door. Use a different example; how about a C tub or a K tub? If it were something that a lot of people are restoring, like the Hawks, what would folks be willing to pay for that?
                          Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
                          Kenmore, Washington
                          hausdok@msn.com

                          '58 Packard Hawk
                          '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
                          '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
                          '69 Pontiac Firebird
                          (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by hausdok View Post
                            You're still not getting it. It doesn't have to be a 50 Champion 4-door. Use a different example; how about a C tub or a K tub? If it were something that a lot of people are restoring, like the Hawks, what would folks be willing to pay for that?
                            These were saved and will be going to Pa. there still is some frames and truck beds and that is just the few things I have at the shop in the parking area.







                            Candbstudebakers
                            Castro Valley,
                            California


                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by hausdok View Post
                              You're still not getting it. It doesn't have to be a 50 Champion 4-door. Use a different example; how about a C tub or a K tub? If it were something that a lot of people are restoring, like the Hawks, what would folks be willing to pay for that?
                              I get what you are saying. And maybe down the line, my answer would be a yes to that. Would you take tub requests?

                              If you get this going, I would love to drop by your shop as you are only about 20 min away from me.
                              1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                I've got a "pile" of sheet metal here. No C-K stuff, but all of some worth to someone looking for various pieces. A fair amount of mechanical stuff too - again, nothing that would generate BIG bucks, but Stude parts nonetheless. Like BP, I'm trying to pare down for reasons of age and agility. Some of my sheet metal is primo, some of it needs minor work ("minor" as opposed to rust belt metal).
                                So - besides listing it on the Swap Page - what do I do to get it gone??? Gone while getting something for the prepping, packing and shipping of it - never mind any recompense for saving it from a lesser fate all these years.
                                No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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