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1958 Studebaker Golden Hawk garage find available

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  • orphanbiker
    replied
    Sorry, I meant to say Park Green instead of Park Blue.

    Yes, I am the same Eric as mentioned in the original post. When I first called Ed at the local club, I was asking to find out what the interest level was like for this car and what kind of difficulty I would face getting it restored.

    I told him I wanted to make sure if I decided to sell it that it would end up in the right hands. I sent him a couple of photos and he posted them here. I must have received 50 messages with intent to buy.

    Thanks for all the great advice about bringing it back to life. I think I will pull the supercharger off and send it to be restored. Any advice as to the best shop to do the work?

    As far as the engine, I think it may be best if I seek out a local shop that has rebuilt the Sweepstakes 289 before. I'm leaning towards doing a full professional rebuild as opposed to me trying to start it only to ruin it by missing some small detail. Any competent shops in the St. Louis area with experience with Studebakers?

    Leave a comment:


  • BubbaBear
    replied
    Would you believe I just learned to check the "about" tab? <G> Congratulations Eric. You can meet a number of the St. Louis Chapter of SDC members next Sunday at the Forest Park Easter Car Show.

    Leave a comment:


  • hausdok
    replied
    Hi Eric,

    After sitting for so long not running, there could be a number of engine issues. Three words - Marvel Mystery Oil - an old time mechanic once taught me how to use that for freeing up old engines. I once used it on a 215ci aluminum V8 from a '63 Olds F85 Cutlass that had been sitting in a wreck in a Massachusetts wrecking yard for nearly 20 years. When I finally got around to starting her she ran like a top.

    Pour a half cup into every cylinder; let is soak a few days, turn it over by hand a few times and let is soak a few more days. Drain the antifreeze and replace it with water - do not leave it dry. Drain the gas out of the tank, replace it with a few gallons of clean gas and some lead substitute. Install a fuel filter, drain the carb bowl.

    After a week or two of allowing it to soak, ground out the coil wire on the block and crank it over with the plugs out for about ten seconds (put a rag over the plug holes to capture the oil that sprays out of those open plug holes. Pour in some clean MMO - about half of what you'd poured in previously - and let it soak another week. When you've finally got it well lubed, spin it over with the starter again with the plugs out to get the rest of the oil out of the cylinders, install the plugs and then fire it up.

    It will smoke like crazy so do this outdoors. The smoke will clear up after a few minutes. Warm it up to operating temperature, shut it down and then drain that old oil. Replace the filter, fill it up with some clean oil, add some radiator/block flush to the cooling system, add a can of engine flush and start it and idle it for about half an hour. Shut it down, drain the oil and replace the oil and filter again. Drian the muck from the radiator and fill it with water again. Don't use coolant/antifreeze yet till you see if you have any engine issues. Don't forget to use a zinc additive for your oil. Start it up and see how she runs.

    Pick up a cheap vaccuum gauge at an auto parts store, hook it up and start the engine to run a quick engine diagnosis. The gauge will tell you if you've got any issues with the rings or valves (wouldn't be surprised after it has sat that long) and tell you whether the head and intake manifold gaskets are still intact. Here's a set of instructions: http://autospeed.com/cms/title_Using...3/article.html

    Good luck and enjoy your Hawk.

    Leave a comment:


  • showbizkid
    replied
    Right on Eric - this is a great story and a great car! Welcome to the Forum and don't be shy about asking questions - we're all eager to help and there's a lot of knowledge here! You have a car to be proud of, and with a little work you'll be up and cruising. Congratulations!

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Excellent, Eric; welcome again. What a find and what a story...and it sounds like you got to it just in the nick of time, if you know what I mean.

    As Rosco said, remove the supercharger belt before trying to start the car...or even cranking it over, for that matter. The supercharger needs to be rebuilt after sitting so long; operating it even a few minutes in its present state could ruin an assortment of parts inside that might be OK now. The engine will run just fine and normal without the supercharger belt on it.

    I hope you've already joined The Studebaker Drivers Club. As you see, it can be done right here, right now on the forum. You'll find 'most everything you need for the car right here. No matter what you spend on it, this car and its provenance are worth it.

    Again, congratulations. Everybody reading your Post #26 looks like Easter already: Tickled pink with a twinge of green envy. BP

    Leave a comment:


  • sweetolbob
    replied
    BB

    It appears from orphanbiker's profile, He is Eric Miller.

    An welcome from here also, Eric. It looks like a great discovery of a desirable studebaker and a neat story also.

    Thank you also for filling out the profile, a lot of current and new folks don't seem to want to spend the time and energy to do that.

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • BubbaBear
    replied
    Who is the Eric Miller mentioned in the original email as having bought the house with the car in it. It sounded as if he discovered the car and was selling it. At least this was the impression I received when I posted the information originally from our chapter president.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    Any parts you might need can be had from our many Stude parts vendors. That said, the distributor cap should be waiting on the shelves of your local NAPA or other competent auto parts store. There's noting weird or rare about it. Spark plug wires? While NAPA might not have a "set" in stock, my experience has been that you can sub a set from a 60s 318 Mopar V8. Don't just replace the few that got toasted.

    Cool find, story & car. If the engine will turn, I'd take the supercharger belt off - pull the cover off the carb box and see if it'll at least fire with a bit of gas down the carb. It's gonna need it's carb built at the very least as well as replacement of any and all hoses and belts. Get a NEW, FRESH fuel pump from one of our vendors and put a fuel filter in line ahead of that new pump. New wheel cylinders and master cylinder can be had at NAPA, and I'd do that rather than dinkin' around with rebuild kits. For the difference in price, it isn't worth scrimping.

    BTW - Welcome to our world. Join SDC and ask ANY questions you want (or search the forum's archives for the answers) Remember that the are NO "dumb questions". They're only dumb when you don't ask them.
    Last edited by Roscomacaw; 04-01-2012, 03:14 PM.

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  • orphanbiker
    replied
    It's finally resting nicely in my garage...

    I'm the guy who was fortunate enough to end up with the 1958 Park Blue Golden Hawk.
    First, let me dispel the urban legend a bit. Yes, it was sitting in a garage since 1969, but it wasn't forgotten - it wasn't hidden in the corner and discovered by moving boxes of Christmas decorations.

    Several weeks ago, one of my best friends called to see if I would help him and his brothers move his dad's Studebaker out of the garage of his house down in St. Louis City (no mention of the model of the Studebaker - I was expecting a Lark). The house was unoccupied and had recently been broken in to. They were concerned someone might vandalize or steal the car. I had spoken to his dad (Ray) a few years ago, and I remember him telling me he had a Studebaker, but never gave it another thought.

    When I arrived at the house, we could see the car in the garage, but we didn't have a key for the locked side door of the garage. I pulled out my Leatherman and easily removed one nail from the hasp and we were in.

    There she sat. A sleek Park Blue Studebaker with a very nice coating of dust. This is the first chance I got to take a look at this beauty. One of the brothers commented at how ugly the car was, but I knew the truth. Until this point, I had no idea what the car was (I knew it was a Studebaker, but I didn't know it was THE Studebaker).

    Immediately, I start asking questions faster than they could be answered. Is this the supercharged model? How long has it been sitting here? When did it last run? How many miles are on it? Where are you taking her? What will you be doing with it? Does it still have the supercharger and all its parts? The brothers knew it was a 1958 Golden Hawk and were quite aware of its rarity.

    This part of St. Louis can be a bit rough, so as soon as we aired the tires and heaved her onto a trailer, off she went to the farm, south of St. Louis. Unfortunately, Ray's health is failing and his sons thought it was time to sell the car and the house for their dad.

    Now, I need to remind you, I went to help my friend move an old car. I spent less than an hour with this car in the capacity as a guy who could help push heavy things up ramps. I wasn't there to evaluate a car to buy.

    I had trouble sleeping that night. I had to have that car. The next day, I called and made an offer on the car (and the house). A few days later we came to an agreement. It's taken several weeks to get all the paperwork in order for the car and the house and this weekend was the time I finally took possession of the car.

    Along the way I learned a few things about the car. Ray bought this car new from Ben Lindebusch in St. Louis. He was newly married at the time and his wife was furious at the purchase (remember, these cars were abouth the same price as a Corvette). Once the kids started coming along, it became impractical, too dangerous and the insurance was too expensive. Around that time Ray and his wife inherited a new four-door Malibu and decided to park the Studebaker. One of the brothers remembers his dad backing the car into the garage under it's own power with nothing wrong with the car. It has sat in that garage ever since.

    In the late 70's Ray attempted to get the car started. He did all the things you would do to a car that had been sitting for 10 years. His buddy squirted a bit of WD-40 in or near the distributor and up came the flames. It was a small fire - burning a few wires, but enough for Ray to throw down the distributor cap, which promptly broke, and to give up on getting it started. I still have the broken cap and am looking for a replacement - could use a few wires as well

    Here's what I know about the car so far: It is a 1958 Park Blue Golden Hawk with white top and white fins with 68,000 miles. It is a one-owner car (I'm the second owner). I have the original owners manual and even the little strip of paper with all the codes telling me what options the car was built with.

    The paint appears to be original. The paint and chrome need a lot of polishing. Much of the chrome will have to be replated. It has rust in the usual places (the garage kept it from getting rained on, but it was not climate controlled). It has rust in the front fenders, rockers, under the fins, some in the floor pan and some in the trunk. I've seen newer cars with much worse. Can someone tell me if mirrors were optional?

    The interior is bad, will need completely removed and restored/replaced. The dash and instruments still look good.

    The engine appears to be complete. It has the McCulloch supercharger in place. I have not tried to turn the motor over, but I did remove the plugs and sprayed the cylinders with WD-40

    I picked her up from the farm on Friday March 30th, 2012. At first I was having some second thoughts about buying the car, but that soon passed as I gave her a more thorough inspection. It looks like a lot of work, but when will I ever get a chance to own another car like this?
    It is now sitting in my garage.

    I haven't done much, but some of the chrome is cleaning up and some of the paint is coming back to life.

    I promised the brothers I would do my best to get the car to the point where they could take a ride.

    The first thought is the engine. I need to get it running. I've been around cars and motorcycles all my life and normally am not afraid to tackle any project, but this one has me a little scared due its rarity. I have never worked on a car with a supercharger either.

    I know I came to the right place by coming here. I need help for everything from sourcing parts, to finding the right resto shops, and to good advice from those who have been down this road.

    Leave a comment:


  • mbstude
    replied
    The one I posted is Park Green. It belonged to a good friend for the past few years.. He's out of garage space. His '57 Jaguar XK140 and '55 T-Bird are also for sale if anyone is interested.

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
    Agreed, Craig; I was thinking the same thing.

    The difference is readily apprarent in this color chip sheet from the 1953-1959 Martin-Senour NAPA paint catalog, but it just isn't co-operating to photo and post here. Park Green is two chips below Mountain Blue, but I dont think you can tell that much difference here. Sorry. BP

    [/B]
    I believe that you mean three chips below, not "two chips below", Mountain Blue. Two chips below Mountain Blue is Parchment White.

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
    The car looks Mountain Blue to me on my monitor. Craig
    Agreed, Craig; I was thinking the same thing.

    The difference is readily apprarent in this color chip sheet from the 1953-1959 Martin-Senour NAPA paint catalog, but it just isn't co-operating to photo and post here. Park Green is the third chip below Mountain Blue, but I dont think you can tell that much difference here. Sorry. BP



    'Sure looking forward to following this car's "processing" into the Studebaker hobby. A rare and happy find, for sure. BP
    Last edited by BobPalma; 02-13-2012, 12:26 PM. Reason: correct Park Green chip location

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by DocHemi View Post
    This is what Park Green looks like when done right. This Hawk just left the Atlanta area, and is now somewhere around Chicago.
    The car looks Mountain Blue to me on my monitor.

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    I spoke to Mr Miller on Sunday. He is not sure what the price will be and he is not yet regitered owner of car. I am sure he will be on the forums soon. He has had some offers but he is still working on paperwork.

    Leave a comment:


  • DocHemi
    replied
    [QUOTE=mbstude;620281]What a cool find. I would love to give that one a cleaning and see what's underneath the dirt.

    This is what Park Green looks like when done right. This Hawk just left the Atlanta area, and is now somewhere around Chicago.




    That car needs to come back to Atlanta.

    Leave a comment:

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