Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1963 Studebaker Closing Photo

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Here an interesting urban explorers video.... All still shots that have been seen before, but still interesting.
    (Turn your sound down)
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

    Comment


    • #17
      Whew! Thank God for the mute button!
      sigpic

      Comment


      • #18
        ...drove through the Union picket line on purpose in a Mercedes Benz!

        I don't think that would have come into play. Mercedes was a Studebaker "captive brand."

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
          It really makes one wonder why they didn't pay more attention to rust-proofing; especially when the effects of road salt attack could literally be seen right out the front windows of the engineering building on a car that was only a few years old....

          Craig
          The problem was known at that time, and before. In the 1950s, cars were built assuming the original owner kept them for three to five years. This is what the manufacturers planned to. They wanted to keep selling new cars, not build something for a 50 year life.
          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by comatus View Post
            ...drove through the Union picket line on purpose in a Mercedes Benz!

            I don't think that would have come into play. Mercedes was a Studebaker "captive brand."
            It actually did cause a big problem. Egbert ended up in a fist fight and got arrested!

            Comment


            • #21
              About the rust on that '55--trust me, in NW PA, our '56 Chevy didn't look much better by summer '64. Rust-out over both headlights and at bottom of fenders. Probably not as 'dramatic' looking as the old Stude vertical 'stripe' of rust, though.
              Last edited by Bill Pressler; 02-11-2012, 05:32 AM.
              Bill Pressler
              Kent, OH
              (formerly Greenville, PA)
              Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
              Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
              1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
              1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
              All are in Australia now

              Comment


              • #22
                Also...that dark-colored '63 Daytona in the photo--is it me, or does it look like the white portion of the wheel covers had been painted to match the body of the car? They look too dark to not be showing any white at all, even with road salt and snow covering it up.
                Bill Pressler
                Kent, OH
                (formerly Greenville, PA)
                Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
                Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
                1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
                1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
                All are in Australia now

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Bill Pressler View Post
                  Also...that dark-colored '63 Daytona in the photo--is it me, or does it look like the white portion of the wheel covers had been painted to match the body of the car? They look too dark to not be showing any white at all, even with road salt and snow covering it up.
                  Correct, Bill; that '63 probably does not have 1963 "Lark" wheel covers. 'Might be 1963 Hawk, or even 1957 full wheel covers; hard to see for sure.

                  I can tell you from wandering the employee parking lots in South Bend during that time, few employee Studebakers had the "right" wheel covers for a given car's year and model.

                  It was common for them to sport something from another year or model, an easily-changed "customizing" thing because so many sets and types of Studebaker wheel covers were floating around South Bend and available so cheap. Mix and match parts were common on employee cars. BP


                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X