Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Observation/Opinion

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 2R5
    replied
    Did you pass wind or something<g>

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Pile
    replied
    Also consider that the V8s can travel the roads better to go to these meets than the 6s can.
    Excuse me?

    Leave a comment:


  • 1962larksedan
    replied
    The Stude Eight was a much better motor than the OHV Six from what I've read and heard. Even Consumer Reports in the early 1960's implicitly stated that a 259 was the better choice: not only was it much more powerful than the Six, it returned better MPG, at least on the highway due to much lower numeric gears.

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    Originally posted by irish View Post
    Just by owning a Studebaker you have a car less seen than others!Joe
    That's IT exactly, Studebakers ARE Special already, so why not show off the better looking models? I know probably most of our Members feel about it the same way I do, but certainly not all.

    My opinion is that I want to promote Studebakers every way I can, so I want to be seen driving the best looking, top of the line models with the most Stock power and nice sounding duals that I can afford.

    So that is why I don't own a Scotsman or want bottom of the line models, or care much about driving the 2 "6" Cyl. Vehicles out of 20 or so V-8's I have.

    Leave a comment:


  • irish
    replied
    Originally posted by drnittler View Post
    I started all this because a friend and I were talking. I seem to have a nack of getting cars that are less seen than others.
    Just by owning a Studebaker you have a car less seen than others!

    Joe

    Leave a comment:


  • irish
    replied
    This is typical of most cars from the 50's-70's. As a rule the 6's outside the 8's and 4-doors outsold 2-doors, but most people in this hobby prefer the V-8's and the 2-doors so more of them are saved.
    Last edited by irish; 02-06-2012, 07:39 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • 556063
    replied
    Production figures are a place to start. Survival rates today depend on whether someone in the past decided to pamper the car.

    No doubt, a V8 car is more attractive than the sixes. And, as it was said above, Studebaker had problems with the OHV Six launch out of the gate.

    It's just like Chevy Novas. My parents and my grandparents both had ones with "250" (six cylinder) above the front sidemarker lights. Those "250" plates were more the rule than the exception back in the '70's. Today, looking at Preserved and Restored Novas, you'd think you could only buy a "350" Nova back in the day!

    Leave a comment:


  • 52-fan
    replied
    One would also wonder how many OHV six cars were junked because of cracked heads back when they were just used cars.

    Leave a comment:


  • drnittler
    replied
    I started all this because a friend and I were talking. I seem to have a nack of getting cars that are less seen than others.

    Leave a comment:


  • 556063
    replied
    In 1961, the first year for the OHV Six, Lark production (From the Standard Catalog of American Cars) added up by model and broken down by engine is as follows:

    Sixes - 41,072
    Eights - 25,513

    1960, the year of my Lark, and the last year for the Flathead Six, things went like this:

    Sixes - 65,013
    Eights - 57,173

    Pretty clear that across all models, dealers probably stocked more sixes for the price advantage. The OHV Six in '61 increased the six cylinder's share of the business pretty notably.

    On survival rates today, there's no doubt more eights were probably pampered. I've also seen some six cylinder cars changed to eights by owners.

    Makes sense. In 1960 with the flathead, my Six Cylinder Convertible gets the same mileage as a V8, and doesn't have the performance the V8 has. We don't race or do hill climbs with our Lark, so the six serves us well. Might have a different opinion if I lived in a big city or around mountains. The V8 convertible outsold the Six convertible in 1960 (5,464 V8 to 3,107 Sixes). In 1961, it was pretty close to half and half (1,002 V8 to 979 Sixes).

    I've never owned one, but the OHV Six definitely made the six a little more attractive to some.

    Leave a comment:


  • 2R5
    replied
    Also consider that the V8s can travel the roads better to go to these meets than the 6s can.

    Leave a comment:


  • silverhawk
    replied
    I have noticed the same; I think it's because many 6 cylinder Larks met there demise becoming parts cars for the more desirable models.

    Leave a comment:


  • raoul5788
    replied
    Originally posted by drnittler View Post
    As a rule, at Studebaker events, are there less 61 Larks (four door, Deluxes), six cylinder, automatic cars compared to other Larks? It seems most Larks out there are V8's. Just wondering.
    I don't know the real numbers, but it seems to me that there are about as many sixes as there are eights. Someone with the productions numbers will post I'm sure.

    Leave a comment:


  • drnittler
    started a topic Observation/Opinion

    Observation/Opinion

    As a rule, at Studebaker events, are there less 61 Larks (four door, Deluxes), six cylinder, automatic cars compared to other Larks? It seems most Larks out there are V8's. Just wondering.
Working...
X