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This does concern me..........we could use some "new blood"

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  • #91
    Originally posted by Blue 15G View Post
    I agree totally with SN-60. And the time I grew up in is gone forever. In the late 50s and all through the 60s, even 70s, you knew your local mechanic and it was a regular ritual going to the "gas station" on Saturday mornings to get your routine maintenance, oil changes, etc. Going on these trips along with Dad were always interesting for a young car nut like myself because the mechanic was always willing to let you watch repair procedures if you were so inclined, and glad to answer questions about cars and help you to learn. You aren't even allowed to be present when your car is being worked on today. Not to mention that the cars were so much more intersting back then to begin with. Today, cars are, by and large, merely looked upon as appliances and why would any youngster have much interest in them when there are computers, etc., to play with? Further, it was relatively easy back then for those mechanically inclined (or even not, but willing to learn), how to do a lot of repairs yourself at home and become a decent "shade-tree" mechanic. Working on projects at home, automotive or otherwise, has largely fallen by the wayside as a hobby or pastime, and it's more about going to soccer games, etc. It's sad but I don't know that there is any real solution.

    Dave Bonn
    "54 Champion starliner
    ...and I agree with both of you. I was born in the 1970s, but I have no love for technology like most people my age. My wife and I buy most of our furniture at antique malls where we buy REAL oak solid wood furniture, for one example. Most things made today are so cheap and disposable, it's ridiculous -- I decided about 20 years ago when I started making my own money, why should I spend it on things that aren't going to last?

    After my last daily driver car was ten years old, I decided to sell it and get something small and fun, and decided on a five speed Mazda 3 hatchback (first japanese car by the way). Not three years into owning it and the a/c compressor basically exploded. The estimates to get it running again ranged from $1500-$2000 and the part itself was about $400. I said forget it, I am not spending money on this thing when they can't even produce something as simple as an a/c compressor. The warranty, by the way, had expired like 6 months previous to this, of course. So every summer i've had to go without a/c, but I guess that is how stubborn I am. I decided my next "new" daily driver car is going to be an old car. I'm just sick of new expensive things being made on the cheap.

    So anyway, I said all that to say, I'm with you guys -- and I too am somewhat discouraged by the lack of interest of today's kids in cars, or even in driving! Up until the last 10 or 15 years, getting out of the house and driving around and doing things was fun to teens. I would love to somehow see those simpler times come back...
    sigpic

    1950 Commander Starlight Coupe
    Regal Deluxe Trim
    Automatic transmission
    46k original miles, 4th Owner

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    • #92
      Give it time. The pendulum will swing. At least today's youth has some real, new performance cars to drool over.

      I was born the same year that Studebaker left South Bend. When I graduated from High School (very early 80's), new car performance was dead, buried under a sea of vacuum hoses and charcoal canisters. And most all people made fun of my Studebaker. In that respect, things were worse then.

      I've been discussing selling some of my cars with the family. My girls have never really said much, until I said that. Come to find out, their friends like them. Especially the boys (getting more important recently, ahem....).

      Very few 16-24 year olds keep the same behaviors and preferences when they get past 40.

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      • #93
        Welcome and Kurt,
        I agree that a gift subscription is a GREAT idea, but only if someone shows a hint of interest in the hobby or seems to like your car/truck. I guarantee I know a number of people who would get the TW issues in the mail and likely think it was just junk mail and chuck it. If a friend/family likes your vehicles and shows interest, THEN a TW subscription and membership may play a great role in building interest.

        So again to build interest it takes people SEEING the cars. Whether that is showing it to them in your garage whenever anyone visits or if that is out at shows and cruises.

        Your mathmetical calculations on the cost/reward of driving forgets a KEY factor....then enjoyment of driving and talking about a STUDE !
        I have paid well over $100k on my motocross passion. A new bike every 2 years for 20+ years, maintanance parts and supplies, wear parts, gear, race entry fees, practice track fees and memberships, and travel to and from tracks and deserts....probably over $250k in reality, even not counting medical bills.....and lost time at work from injuries. Counting that stuff, 1/2m, count in what my insurance has paid in and I am over 1m

        I have done it GLADLY because of the love of doing it. Paying for insurance and fuel in my Stude will not be simply an expense or labor of love, it is going to be a JOY that I am sure will keep me smiling. That is a reward to me, on top of opening opportunities to talk about and show off the brand. THEN give a subscription to interested friends. jmho.

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        • #94
          I agree and disagree to a point about todays kids. While I know where my kid got his knowledge about Studebakers, there are others like him around here. A few days ago, a friend of his gave him a ride home and he was driving an early Dodge Dart. This kid's Dad is a Mopar nut. There are a number of older cars in the high school parking lot. Maybe it is a regional thing. At least, the way I see it, some of us are passing on the torch to younger guys. I'm sure that when my sons provisional license is upgraded, I'll see a mob of kids riding in a Studebaker.
          Jamie McLeod
          Hope Mills, NC

          1963 Lark "Ugly Betty"
          1958 Commander "Christine"
          1964 Wagonaire "Louise"
          1955 Commander Sedan
          1964 Champ
          1960 Lark

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          • #95
            I agree. The person needs to be into cars or the hobby. Not necessarily Studebakers though. Ihad 0 interest in them.... They were too odd for my tastes at the time. Even Grandpa called the 51 a two row corn picker....... It was Turning Wheels that sparked my interest. What pushed me over the top was the year the International Meet was in Springfield MO. I think it was 1991. I called the meet chairman, Cliff Taylor, from a phone number listed in Turning Wheels. He talked me into coming. Keep In mind in 1991 I was 25 years old. I went, met Cliff,he took my picture with his car, and gave me a meet belt buckle. Other guys I met were equally encouraging. On my home my young wife and could not get over how nice these "old guys" were. I joined the club shortly after that. So it was turning wheels that lit the spark. A better idea maybe would be to give our old issues to other car friends. I know I have 20 years worth laying around my house.
            1962 Champ

            51 Commander 4 door

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            • #96
              and ..........another reality check: whatever kind of Studebaker anybody is looking at is going to be immediately and truly unsafe to drive. Try selling that to a pair of parents worried about booze, drugs, etc.......very tough sell....

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              • #97
                I drove my Hawk to the Post Office today and three people stopped me to talk about it. One guy used to have a Packard so was pretty familiar with Studebaker. Another guy wanted to know what it was and just couldn't get over how "cool" my car was. Even got a few thumbs up from some young ladies.... ; )

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                • #98
                  I was recently at a stude event and the owner of a hawk was answering my questions about his engine conversion , blah blah blah and asked me to vote for his car. I told him I had already voted for a 1955 stude that was a little frumpy but looked like a running barn find very cool. He just walked away pretty tacky.

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                  • #99
                    jack b the positive side of that is can't drive what isn't running, keep kids at home fixing it.
                    Last edited by K-Hawk; 01-27-2012, 06:50 PM.

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                    • KURT find a high school in your area with an automotive program they would love to have them.

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                      • A lot has been said on this thread.
                        And I agee with most of it.
                        I too am 59 and have been into cars since I was 9yrs old when car picture wheels came out in Jello.
                        I have been in the Vintage Car Club of Canada, A steetrod Car Club and a Custom car club, before becoming an SDC member.
                        My mother hade a Bullet Nose when I was very young and I always loved the styling of Avani's and C/K 's.
                        But ironically my first Studebaker was an M Series that I knew nothing about, except that I used to refer to them as those "cross eyed trucks" whenever I saw one in a farmers field.
                        I was going to kee this post short?????
                        I do think that the only way to get young people back to the marque is to promote the fact that it is an opportunity to do and be something different than everybody else is doing. And that in the big picture it is not as expensive as most people make it out to be.
                        Studebakers are still very plentiful and definitely a lot cheaper to purchase than a lot of other memorable cars...ie Cameros, Msutangs, Corvettes etc.
                        You just had to watch the Barrett Jackson to realize that.
                        But that being said I still get scorned at the Car Club meetings I attend (other than the SDC meetings) for owning a Studebaker. But we still have 3 in our collection now and I want more. And the most car club fun we are having these days is with the SDC, even if its membership is Old!
                        Good Roads
                        Brian
                        rr bu e
                        Brian Woods
                        woodysrods@shaw.ca
                        1946 M Series (Shop Truck)

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                        • Having belonged to a large multi-make car club for years, I agree with Brian. I joined the club before I bought my Studebaker. After I bought it a fellow member asked my why we bought it? I told him because we liked it! With around 200 members our car was the only post-War II Studebaker actively seen. Having presented a program on Raymond Loewy and another on the Avanti and being at many shows, I was referred to as the Studebaker expert! I smiled when I heard it. I would be scared to provide a program to the SDC forum members, as I would certainly not be considered an expert! I was pleased when the former local club president who had several cars bought his first Studebaker. He had his wife check out our Avanti which she liked, but she felt it would be difficult for her to enter and exit. Visibility helps the marque!
                          Last edited by Bob Bryant; 01-28-2012, 08:22 AM.
                          "Growing old is mandatory, but growing up is optional." author unknown

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                          • Originally posted by starliner62 View Post
                            I agree and disagree to a point about todays kids. While I know where my kid got his knowledge about Studebakers, there are others like him around here. A few days ago, a friend of his gave him a ride home and he was driving an early Dodge Dart. This kid's Dad is a Mopar nut. There are a number of older cars in the high school parking lot. Maybe it is a regional thing. At least, the way I see it, some of us are passing on the torch to younger guys. I'm sure that when my sons provisional license is upgraded, I'll see a mob of kids riding in a Studebaker.
                            Does NC have mandatory insurance and annual state inspections for all cars, no matter what age? This and climate have a bearing on how many older cars are driven by younger people.
                            Gary L.
                            Wappinger, NY

                            SDC member since 1968
                            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by jackb View Post
                              and ..........another reality check: whatever kind of Studebaker anybody is looking at is going to be immediately and truly unsafe to drive. Try selling that to a pair of parents worried about booze, drugs, etc.......very tough sell....
                              This reminds me of a decade ago when I sold my 1989 Thunderbird. I ordered the car new and fanatically maintained it. I sold it to a family in the area. The wife made her husband drive it and wouldn't allow her teen age children to drive it because it didn't have air bags.
                              Gary L.
                              Wappinger, NY

                              SDC member since 1968
                              Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                              Comment


                              • Try taking your TW to the parts store, doctor office etc, and tell them to give it away after a week or 2 of being looked at.

                                If only 6,000 members did this, wow!

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