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This does concern me..........we could use some "new blood"

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  • #31
    Originally posted by RadCruiser View Post
    Alright so I am just 24, and before I got my cruiser I had no idea what studebakers looked like. I remember when I worked at Auto Zone going thru the lists of cars as i'm bored and finding studebaker and just thinking to myself "what in the world is a studebaker?! ." I was actually searching craigslist and the web for a cool muscle car to drive around in, but of course stuff like chargers, camaros and gtos for the years I like are wayyyy too much and a shop owner I delivered to told me he had something for sale. To be honest, first time I saw the car, it was kinda ugly and did not really scream muscle (then again with a name Cruiser, I should know better). But the secons time I came up I bought. Just not many on the road like it, and its funny to come up to part stores and have the kids at the counter give you weird looks when you say its for a studebaker. They are just cool cars
    There's hope after all!

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    • #32
      I get a phone call a couple of days a week asking if I know that our 58 was parked at the high school. Of course I know, my son is driving his car. All of his friends love it and it turns heads everywhere. The downside is that if it wasn't for my interest in Studebakers and any "out of the ordinary" car, my son probably would not know about them. We are lucky to have a few Studebakers in town and sometimes gather at the local cruise in, not often enough, but when we do it normally causes plenty of attention. I know that there was a big push for younger members a few years ago, but it seemed to fall on deaf ears as far as the SDC Board was concerned. James, my son is the youngest member of our chapter and probably the North Carolina chapter as well. Exposure is part of the answer and we plan on plenty of it this year and hopefully years to come.
      Last edited by starliner62; 01-24-2012, 01:14 PM. Reason: i can't spell
      Jamie McLeod
      Hope Mills, NC

      1963 Lark "Ugly Betty"
      1958 Commander "Christine"
      1964 Wagonaire "Louise"
      1955 Commander Sedan
      1964 Champ
      1960 Lark

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      • #33
        Originally posted by starliner62 View Post
        I get a phone call a couple of days a week asking if I knew that our 58 was parked at the high school. Of course I know, my son is driving his car. All of his friends love it and it turns heads everywhere.
        Thanks for making my day, Jamie. I have no regrets selling that one.

        Comment


        • #34
          [B]This is the same problem that model railroading had in the '70's and '80's. Steam engines died because kids never saw one and in 1992 the new modeler could only remember Conrail and a few survivors. Prices were very high for a "cheap" hobby. Now I just saw a series of ads for some of my old cars. When we made them they were $6.95 and required assembly, now they are assembled, put together and printed in China and sell for $21.95 to $32.50. Same thing as Studebaker parts.

          Now as somebody said our cars are coing into their rightful place, the $65 front fender is now $1750.00

          We need PR. We need these cars placed in movies and TV shows, also part of an editorial in fashion magazines, and especially we ne3ed our cars in every auto magazine. Be it a small word or two, or a photo essay.

          One other issue is the newbie only wants high end cars. They figure if they are going to thow $3000 into chrome jobs, put it in a the top of the line model, so they eventually can get a few dollars back.

          I am starting on a small railroad diorama, since I left the hobby a $6.95 switch is now $18 to $30.

          The only way to get people into our cars is to kill the reputation of it being the poor man's car, and similar remarks. The other thing is to start showing cars that are under work not 385-400 pointers. People fear to venture into anything that they feel is beyond thier ability.

          BB

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          • #35
            This has been an excellent discussion so far. I'd just like to add that I'm creeping up on 50, and the only Studebakers I can remember from my younger days were the occasional 50's pickup or a lark. It wasn't until I was in my late 20's that I noticed a really cool car with fins (a 59 Hawk) at a "junky" dealer's lot on the way into work. I'd stopped and looked at it, couldn't afford it, knew little about it (except that my 9th grade science teacher had mentioned how streamlined golden hawks were and that they had a supercharger.) But this started my interest.

            Soon after, I joined SDC (the first time through), learned as much as I could about Studebakers and decided that one day, I would have one if I could. It only took me 20-odd years, but I'm there.*

            I think that many people, like myself, may get into the hobby now at a much later age simply because they weren't in a position to do so earlier.

            My fear is the loss of knowledge as members just a few years older than I am now will pass on. I'll be a damn poor substitute at 70 for someone now the same age with a greater depth of knowledge and experience of these cars!

            *now that I look back on those early days, I wonder what would have happened if someone from the local chapter of the club had gotten my info and made a personal effort to contact me--to invite me to some events and get me involved--even though I didn't have a car. Would I have found an old Stude for my first restoration then (instead of that MGB which fell into my lap a couple of years later--or the 911 that followed it)? That little bit of effort and coordination (and the potential for a mentorship sort of relation) might have changed my car history a great deal.
            Last edited by dnevin; 01-24-2012, 11:47 AM. Reason: thought of one more thing to add.
            Dave Nevin
            Corvallis, OR
            1953 Champion Deluxe Coupe
            Stud-e-venture blog

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            • #36
              There have been a lot of good points made, especially driving your cars. If my wife knew how many cars and parts I've bought just because someone saw me driving a Studebaker my car would never leave the garage. What concerns me is I've been in the club for 14 years now, since I was 16, and this topic keeps coming up. Has the overall number of members gone down? Has there been a huge influx of 20-somethings in the club? Not really.





              Nick

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              • #37
                Lots of great discussion here!

                So far, Michidan's post has grabbed me the most. Unfortunately, personal time conflicts now keep me from attending my local Chapter meetings, which are 45 miles one-way. When I was there on a regular basis, there were a growing number of under-50 guys who were keen into the cars and the hobby. The Chapter President is now a guy under 40!

                Regarding the thought that the hobby in general will peter out as the older generation passes, I disagree. Similar things were said about the Model T Club, and for a while it looked to be true... until younger guys started discovering that these were collectible antiques that they could maintain, run and have fun with without spending beaucoups bucks.

                We'd all like to see our cars become more valuable, but I think it's good that Studebakers represent an affordable way to get into a fun hobby. When cars are priced so that only old guys can afford them -- only old guys are in the clubs.

                Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                Comment


                • #38
                  I did not see ANY Studebakers around when I was growing up except for my grandpa's best friend's 1949 grain truck. The main reason for my developed interest in Studebakers as a child was their uniqueness, style and rarity. I think that many young club members here also like the fact that their Studebakers are very uncommon and unique. It is unlikely that we can recruit the average young adult but instead we are more likely to recruit a young adult that doesnt like to follow the crowd and likes to be a bit unique.
                  With that said, perhaps our club should try advertising in non-automotive-only magazines & websites that reach a wide age range of persons. Such magazines could include Popular Science, National Geographic and Newsweek (these magazines are typically displayed in city and school libraries).
                  Perhaps we need to think more outside-the-box....any long-haul semi-truck owner-operators here with a van trailer that would be willing to have the sides of their trailer covered in a full-sized Studebaker Driver's Club decal/graphic showing some of Studes most famous models along with website address?
                  What about those Studebaker model replica cars that are sold at numerous stores that have a toy department? Could our club work with the manufacturers of these cars to include some basic information of our club to include in or on the packaging?
                  That's all for now....
                  sigpic
                  In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    I have read through this and began to wonder about how serious the powers to be in the SDC really care about including younger folks in our midst. When Ed Reynolds was SDC President we (Ed, Bob Shaw and I) developed the "21 and Under" project. It was designed to make sure younger Studebaker owners got recognized so they would continue to be contributors to the SDC and to our marque. The program involved organizers of major SDC events. This was to include International and Zone Meets plus significant other SDC events. Organizers who chose to have their events participate were sent cards, signed by Ed and I (as the coordinator of the program). These entitled any person displaying a Studebaker who was 21 years old or younger to a T-Shirt. Those shirts were done by Bill Glass and who sent them out to the recipient. Some organizers actually asked for t-shirts for their event in advance so they could be awarded at the event itself. This too was an option. Over Ed's term in office we got very few people to cooperate with this program. It was put in Turning Wheels, it was put before members of this forum, and notice of it was sent to Zone Coordinators. Once Ed left office the program fell apart. I contacted the then new president about this with no response. I also contacted the SE Zone rep to the board with no response. Was this program a success? Well, I guess it depends on how you measure success. I will never forget the grin on the face to the young man I gave card to at the Lancaster IM. He immediately took it to Bondo who printed up the shirt on the spot. His mother told me lately he was thrilled. I heard of other such responses. Those are successes, but unfortunately because event organizers and many of the leaders of the SDC did not feel it was important enough to actually support. Our new president's comments in the Januarey Turning Wheels were very interesting and lead me to believe that possibly money was the reason for programs like the "21 and Under" project were left to wither up and die. What is all that money for? Attitudes like that will surely hinder any future SDC growth.
                    Joe Roberts
                    '61 R1 Champ
                    '65 Cruiser
                    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Our club in Houston is in need of younger blood at 59 I'm one of the younger members, Houston is a big metro area 6 million plus people. I go to a lot of multi mark shows, I've seen only three other studes in the past year, that's out of maybe a thousand cars. I just bought a '65 TBird hoping to find like minded people, don't get me wrong I love my '63 Gt Hawk. I get great compliments at shows an plenty of thumbs up on the road.
                      I also have a '67 Triumph Vitesse, the Triumph club in Houston is very active. I've been to two Triumph National shows always had fun. Triumph clubs want you to drive your cars, to enter in the show at the Nat'ls you have to participate in two driving events.
                      I went to the regoinal Stude meet in Tulsa, OK and the Nationals in Springfield, my opinion we need to spice it up a little bit. by the way I drove to both events.
                      I used to have a nice car trailer and somone stole it, bummer but oh well.
                      My motto has always been "drive it like you stole it"
                      Last edited by TXmark; 01-24-2012, 05:31 PM.
                      Mark Riesch
                      New Bern, NC

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Milaca View Post
                        I did not see ANY Studebakers around when I was growing up except for my grandpa's best friend's 1949 grain truck. The main reason for my developed interest in Studebakers as a child was their uniqueness, style and rarity. I think that many young club members here also like the fact that their Studebakers are very uncommon and unique. It is unlikely that we can recruit the average young adult but instead we are more likely to recruit a young adult that doesnt like to follow the crowd and likes to be a bit unique.
                        With that said, perhaps our club should try advertising in non-automotive-only magazines & websites that reach a wide age range of persons. Such magazines could include Popular Science, National Geographic and Newsweek (these magazines are typically displayed in city and school libraries).
                        Perhaps we need to think more outside-the-box....any long-haul semi-truck owner-operators here with a van trailer that would be willing to have the sides of their trailer covered in a full-sized Studebaker Driver's Club decal/graphic showing some of Studes most famous models along with website address?
                        What about those Studebaker model replica cars that are sold at numerous stores that have a toy department? Could our club work with the manufacturers of these cars to include some basic information of our club to include in or on the packaging?
                        That's all for now....
                        Two words: Tin Worm.

                        I'm from the Wash DC area and cars/trucks rotted away within 6 years--------------tops. Hence my seeing very few mid 1960's or older vehicles still on the road let alone in good shape ca. 1975. And Mn winters are much worse coupled with the road salt used.
                        --------------------------------------

                        Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                        Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                        "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Am I the youngest owner at 18?

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            no, I think we had afellow posting who was 17 a few months back
                            Mark Riesch
                            New Bern, NC

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              27 year old checking in.

                              I bought my 1955 E series truck V8 when I was 25. I also have a 67 Chevelle, and a 73 Blazer.

                              Always been into old cars, when I bought my truck I had never even SEEN a Stude truck in real life.

                              I think the main thing is that Studes (for the most part) aren't as sexy as their counterparts to most people: 55 chevys, 64 GTOs, 50 ford Pickups, etc.

                              There is some hope out there guys

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                I have noticed that in recent years the regular posters here have become more accepting of
                                modified cars. This is a welcome trend and I hope it continues. You might ask, why is this
                                important to the survival of SDC? With the trends of modern cars, and what the "kids today"
                                grow up seeing (TV/movies/video games) : a Lark with tiny trailer size tires can get lost in
                                the crowd of Camaros and Mustangs.

                                When I installed these :



                                I started to get quite a few young people commenting how cool it looked. Here on the forum
                                I got tons of private messages, email and such condemning the install, telling me how I have
                                destroyed a piece of history. Terms like attention whore, baby buggy wheels, etc were tossed
                                around making me seriously consider never returning. This was 2006. The wheels are only
                                17 inches, which were "small" in comparison to production vehicles of that year. Now a new
                                Camaro BASE model coming with 18 inch steel wheels, and options up to 20 inch!

                                Why did these long standing, very influential people on the forum feel the need to make one
                                of their recent additions feel so much hate? It was a big problem for me, and one that will
                                stick with me for years. Not any other forum I have been on, did I receive so many personal
                                attacks for a wheel choice. It was only by way of quiet support from others too fearful to post
                                on the forum that I decided to stick around.

                                With a "welcome" like that, why would the average new member stick around?

                                Tom
                                Last edited by showbizkid; 01-24-2012, 06:14 PM.
                                '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
                                Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
                                http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
                                I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

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