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This does concern me..........we could use some "new blood"

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  • #16
    We're aging, but the cars are timeless. Sounds like the beginning of an advertising campaign!!! Great to use as a headline!
    1957 Studebaker Champion 2 door. Staten Island, New York.

    "Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think." -Albert Einstein

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    • #17
      Alright so I am just 24, and before I got my cruiser I had no idea what studebakers looked like. I remember when I worked at Auto Zone going thru the lists of cars as i'm bored and finding studebaker and just thinking to myself "what in the world is a studebaker?! ." I was actually searching craigslist and the web for a cool muscle car to drive around in, but of course stuff like chargers, camaros and gtos for the years I like are wayyyy too much and a shop owner I delivered to told me he had something for sale. To be honest, first time I saw the car, it was kinda ugly and did not really scream muscle (then again with a name Cruiser, I should know better). But the secons time I came up I bought. Just not many on the road like it, and its funny to come up to part stores and have the kids at the counter give you weird looks when you say its for a studebaker. They are just cool cars

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      • #18
        I drive my car daily and have had people at stop lights roll down their window and ask me what it is. Everyone loves it. My kids both in their 20's are sympathic to Dad, but are not into cars execpt point A to point B. I hand out TW whenever some one asks about the car and I can talk to them. It is an ongoing battle. At car shows, very rarely do I get looks or inquiries, it is the average man and woman on the street that show the interest.

        Mark

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        • #19
          Originally posted by RadCruiser View Post
          Alright so I am just 24, and before I got my Cruiser I had no idea what Studebakers looked like. I remember when I worked at Auto Zone going thru the lists of cars as I'm bored and finding Studebaker and just thinking to myself "what in the world is a Studebaker?!"

          I was actually searching craigslist and the web for a cool muscle car to drive around in, but of course stuff like Chargers, Camaros and GTOs for the years I like are wayyyy too much and a shop owner I delivered to told me he had something for sale. To be honest, first time I saw the car, it was kinda ugly and did not really scream muscle (then again with a name Cruiser, I should know better). But the second time I came up I bought.

          Just not many on the road like it, and its funny to come up to part stores and have the kids at the counter give you weird looks when you say its for a Studebaker. They are just cool cars
          Thanks, Rad. For some reason, your post "made my day."

          A couple weeks short of 66, now, I'm aware of us older guys knowing the torch must be either passed or buried with us. I believe I speak for all of us when I say we'd like to pass it on to newbies like you and the growing multitude of under-30s we have here on the forum.

          Carry on. BP
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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          • #20
            I personally think that all old car clubs are going to be downsizing in the very near future. Its inevitable.....I look back at my father who drove Studebakers ( thats where I got my interest ....I grew up with them , which most of us SDCers did, but my father grew up with 20's ,30's and 40 cars and guess what thats were his old car interests were. Its not hard to figure out , just look at cruise nights , they are mostly the same around the country ....the young people that are interested in cars are coming in with the "tuner" types , sure maybe there are a few interested in our old iron but they are far and few apart. I have 3 kids , only one is interested in the Studebakers , he is young with a morgage , other interests that ,young people have today. He is a member of SDC ( because I got him started) and even gave him a Studebaker but the Studebaker sure isn't one of the real important things in his life , thats for sure. I'm sure he will continue the Studebaker stuff long after I'm gonebut not to the extent that I do.
            If one looks at their chapter members and just figures how many 20 -30 year olds are in the club this will probably tell you just how big the chapters will be down the road. You can count on one hand how many members are in that age bracket in my chapter and that should be an indication how big our club will be in another say 20 years. That isn't enough to sustain a chapter and I would think that alot of other chapters are in the same boat. I don't want to be negative but I think the writing is on the wall.....enjoy it while we can !
            sigpic

            Home of the Fried Green Tomato

            "IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

            1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

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            • #21
              I'm glad this comes up from time to time, but I know the SDC will be OK.
              Younger folks (I'm 45) don't have time for car clubs! I barely have time to work on the car. Our product - the Studebaker and the fine people that drive them - is a good one. The market for it will be there. Studebakers are attractive and unique. The fact that there has not been a new one since 1966 is not a big factor.
              In my 20's I was in the Buick club of America. I was typically the only one at any event without gray hair. And you could buy a brand new Buick at the time.
              Couldn't it already be said that the club is doing better than Studebaker as a company ever did in its market?

              Honestly, I'm far more worried about the "marketplace" disappearing than the cars or the club.
              Support SEMA, fight clunker and zoning laws, and lets make sure that any and all old cars are welcome on the roads of the future!!

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              • #22
                Glad to make your day Bob.
                To 2R5, I'm actually one of those kids too. I have a tuner car that I have been in a car club for 6 years with now, but of course we also have some older guys with muscles cars too and not just "rice burners." Those are the guys that help me out a lot now, which is kinda cool that it brought me closer to them since now they are showing me how stuff was back in theird days.
                Once im done my car, I think I will be driving it to shows a lot more then my Eclipse now.

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                • #23
                  All good ideas.
                  --------------------------------------

                  Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                  Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                  "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

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                  • #24
                    Certainly there are many factors to this "dilemma", another one to consider is economics. I have a 19 yr old son, and even though he's not into old cars, even if he was it is much cheaper, and easier, to just buy an old Honda or an f-150, etc.
                    And I agree with the above posts that mention how we tend to like what we were familiar with when we were young. And, let's face it, Studebakers weren't all that popular even "back in the day". I graduated from high school in '79, and my '61 Lark was the only Studie in the entire student parking lot(and this in a school of 2000 kids)!

                    Jim B

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 2R5 View Post
                      I don't want to be negative but I think the writing is on the wall.....enjoy it while we can !
                      I agree with Bob (2R5). That doesn't mean we shouldn't be doing everything that is suggested here (and more) to interest others in Studebakers and the SDC, but I'm not optimistic that we can maintain 13,000 members in the coming years, let alone grow.

                      I think it is difficult to convince someone who has lusted after a Corvette, or a 57 Chevy, or a GTO, or a 240Z, or a WRX, or whatever...that they should switch and start lusting after a Studebaker. You are just not going to get many converts. We tend to be attracted to the cars that were important to us at the time we were getting interested in cars. Just as many Studebaker enthusiasts would rather "fight than switch", so too would Chevy and Ford (and the Mazda and Honda) guys.

                      Same with young people. There is not only a big difference between a Honda CRX and a 4 door Lark, but more importantly with the folks that hang around those two cars. The first car I ever did was when I was 15 and restored a 30 Model A coupe...



                      Keep in mind that this car was only 30 years old at the time. I attended a few Model A club functions and even then found the crowd old and boring. I sold it and bought a black 57 Chevy with a 301 and 4 speed. A much more fun car, and just as important, the crowd to hang out with .

                      I've told this story before, but at the Spokane meet, I brought this Chevy powered Starliner...



                      I had an old guy (actually about the same age that I am ) come up to me...look me straight in the eye...and with a quivering upper lip told me "You RUINED this car". I laughed it off, but if another hot rodder had been faced with the same "welcome" they may have been out of there (and out of the SDC) faster than you can say "light up the hides".

                      I don't hold it against anyone to be passionate about stock Studebakers. Our membership is what it is. It is just that it may not be the membership that young people or hot rodders want to hang out with.

                      My son (38 years old) is just as car crazy as I am. When he was in high school, he didn't lust after a Studebaker. We built a Scrirocco to run D/Street Prepared auto cross (his choice). Today he instructs for the BMW CCA and races an E36 M3.

                      http://steinkamp.us/622/bmwcca-at-laguna

                      In my wildest dreams I can't see him or the anyone in car crowd he hangs with going ga ga over a Studebaker.

                      So with that said, what CAN we capitalize on?

                      1. PRICE...Essentially any Studebaker is less expensive to buy and own than most other similar cars. How about that R4 Avanti that John (289stude) just bought for $20k? That would be a 25% down payment on a similar Corvette. A 2 door hardtop 4 speed Lark is about 1/4 the price of a similar Chevy II Nova. A 4 door Lark is close to "give away" and is a fun, unique, nice driving car. Studebakers are a cheap way to get into the collector car hobby.

                      2. PARTS AVAILABILITY...We are so fortunate to have virtually ANY part available for our cars from a relatively large number of vendors...either NOS, reproduced or used...especially considering the low production numbers. Try finding the same for Hudsons, Ramblers, or other off brands. Even parts for many MoPars, Pontiacs, Oldsmobiles, Buicks are not as plentiful as parts for Studebakers.

                      3. "FAMOUS" MODELS...50-51 cars, Hawks, 53-54 Starliners and Starlights, supercharged cars, and Avantis, are all generally well known by "car guys". Although some of us gravitate to the more common Studes, the cars listed are the ones that are and will be remembered. Trying to interest someone in a '52 Land Cruiser is very different than the crowd reaction to a Golden Hawk going across the auction stage.

                      4. CUSTOM AND MODIFIED CARS...Quite frankly, this is the future of the hobby and maybe the future of SDC. I think back on my Model A days. Back then there were more stock Model A's than hot rods. Not today. Same with 36-40 Fords. I can't remember seeing many (if any) stockers recently but I I've see literally hundreds of modified ones in the last year. When was the last time you saw a 50 Mercury with a full height roof? Even 60's muscle cars that everyone was "restoring" several years ago are now being done as "pro street" or "G machines". The one common element I can see over the years in the car hobby is custom and modified cars. Restoring cars works for the age group that knew them when they were new. Custom and modified cars seem to be a much longer lasting part of the car hobby.
                      Last edited by Dick Steinkamp; 01-24-2012, 10:34 AM.
                      Dick Steinkamp
                      Bellingham, WA

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                      • #26
                        I think 2R5 hit the nail on the head. As kids grow up and are able to dabble with the car hobby, they will purchase what 'they' remember, and it won't be Studebakers. That's just the way it is and I doubt we as a club can do much about that. Look at the posted pictures of club events, and, the pictues in TW's. Most have gray hair now, or, none at all. Young'ens are few and far between. Sure, as a club we can do things that attract a FEW of the younger generation But, that won't sustain the club. For us that collect Studebaker memoribilia, I have often said that IF you are doing it for profit down the road, you better start selling now. In 20 years, the only people that will want our Stude stuff are museums, and, they will want it for free. Generally people will say, what's a Studebaker. Sad to say, but we are a dying breed. stupak
                        Last edited by stupak; 01-24-2012, 10:31 AM.

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                        • #27
                          Not wishing to offend anyone, I'd like to say that often the most visible and active members of any non profit creating organization are those who are of retirement age. I know there are lots of us out there in our 40's and younger that wish we had time to be more active. Financial freedom would be the best friend this old car guy could find to help him do more.

                          I'm also strongly with the people who have mentioned watching closely the laws and regulations that impact the hobby. Besides National regulatory threats (not going there), taxes and fees based on actual value vs. age would be one way to put a collector vehicle out of reach of the average person. This is a state by state or locality issue. With governmental units looking for any way to increase sagging revenues due to lower economic activity, those of us "lucky" enough to own an extra car for pleasure could be easily targeted. I couldn't afford the cars I own today if I had to pay more for taxes or insurance. The preferential treatment many local governments (and insurance companies) give in these areas needs to be defended and protected. Especially if we want younger people to be able to afford to join us.

                          Overall, the club needs to be as tech savvy and up to date as it can. I've seen great strides in that the last few years. When will we see the new Studebaker IPhone App? I don't know if any other club has done it, but a Marque history and presentation that could be downloaded and/or used to compare Studes to other or current models could be something that could get a lot of attention. I know companies spend a lot of money to develop those Apps, so that may not be realistic. Just a funny thought. Might at least get noticed on late night TV.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by jbrotten View Post
                            Certainly there are many factors to this "dilemma", another one to consider is economics. I have a 19 yr old son, and even though he's not into old cars, even if he was it is much cheaper, and easier, to just buy an old Honda or an f-150, etc.
                            And I agree with the above posts that mention how we tend to like what we were familiar with when we were young. And, let's face it, Studebakers weren't all that popular even "back in the day". I graduated from high school in '79, and my '61 Lark was the only Studie in the entire student parking lot(and this in a school of 2000 kids)!

                            Jim B
                            Excellent point there, sad to say.

                            I graduated in 1975 in the Wash DC area and remember virtually no Studes with the exception of a 1957 Hawk (2 door sedan). That's it.

                            It wasn't till I moved to Calif in 1978 that I started seeing 2 or more Studes: a 1962-64 Lark 'vert and a ca. 1957 Commander 4 door in Burlingame. SoCal the one shop I worked at had a 1964 2 door sedan or hardtop V8 Lark type, Daytona?
                            --------------------------------------

                            Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                            Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                            "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by stupak View Post
                              I think 2R5 hit the nail on the head. As kids grow up and are able to dabble with the car hobby, they will purchase what 'they' remember, and it won't be Studebakers. That's just the way it is and I doubt we as a club can do much about that. Look at the posted pictures of club events, and, the pictues in TW's. Most have gray hair now, or, none at all. Young'ens are few and far between. Sure, as a club we can do things that attract a FEW of the younger generation But, that won't sustain the club. For us that collect Studebaker memoribilia, I have often said that IF you are doing it for profit down the road, you better start selling now. In 20 years, the only people that will want our Stude stuff are museums, and, they will want it for free. Generally people will say, what's a Studebaker. Sad to say, but we are a dying breed. stupak
                              Maybe. And the few restored to stock survivors out there will be the Hawks, Avantis, 1950-51 Bulletnoses, and an occasional Marshall, R1 or higher Lark, etc. Most of the rest of the survivors will be people like me who swapped in 350 Chevys, etc. since those cars can still be kept running for $.
                              --------------------------------------

                              Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                              Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                              "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Michidan View Post
                                I'm glad this comes up from time to time, but I know the SDC will be OK.
                                Younger folks (I'm 45) don't have time for car clubs! I barely have time to work on the car. Our product - the Studebaker and the fine people that drive them - is a good one. The market for it will be there. Studebakers are attractive and unique. The fact that there has not been a new one since 1966 is not a big factor.
                                In my 20's I was in the Buick club of America. I was typically the only one at any event without gray hair. And you could buy a brand new Buick at the time.
                                Couldn't it already be said that the club is doing better than Studebaker as a company ever did in its market?

                                Honestly, I'm far more worried about the "marketplace" disappearing than the cars or the club.
                                Support SEMA, fight clunker and zoning laws, and lets make sure that any and all old cars are welcome on the roads of the future!!
                                Dan

                                That is well written and very close to the crux of the issue.

                                My son (Jim - 47) and I had the opportunity to travel together last week with just ourselves in the car for over six hours. We discussed a lot of issues but we eventually got around to comparing our youths. It just reiterated the differences in our younger years and very differing perception of vehicles. My era was one as the first generation of college graduates in our family and the need to have a job in high school to fund outside interests and future college. Sports were fairly unorganized outside of school and then only programs in high school. So most of us with outside jobs left school early to go to them and needed a car to get there.The economics of the times usually meant that we drove less than dependable transportation and had to learn to repair them to keep 'em on the road.

                                There were, of course, the typical desire to compete but without sports, cars became the outlet. So most of us went racing, either sanctioned or unsanctioned, therefore making the car a part of our development during our youth. These are the parts of our development that made cars more than transportation.

                                In my sons case, His competitive juices were fulfilled from the time he was seven years old by well coached and well organized sports. The cars became just a method to transport him to his next competitive event. He had no time nor desire to fix them so Dad took care of that issue. His education and other activities were more important so cars did not become a portion of the fabric of his life. He watches NASCAR but again there is no inherent need to get involved just watch and go on to the next endevour.

                                I now have four grandkids, three currently drive and the last is a year away and none have any interest in the car hobby. They love Gramp's noisy unusual cars and like to ride in them but to own one, No So Much.

                                I agree with Dan's well expressed observations and believe the hobby will continue but in reduced form. It will not be "Your Fathers Hobby".

                                After all that, I support any good suggestions on how to advertise our hobby as the presence of Matt, Dylan, Chris and others in the club shows there is still a spark among the youth. For me, The local shows will continue to be on my list to show the Avantis.

                                Bob
                                Last edited by sweetolbob; 01-24-2012, 10:55 AM.

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