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  • brush on electrical tape

    Just reading in a Menard's add of brush on electrical tape on sale. Anyone ever use it and is it worth a darn.

  • #2
    Originally posted by tjanowia View Post
    Just reading in a Menard's add of brush on electrical tape on sale. Anyone ever use it and is it worth a darn.
    I didn't get mine from Menard's, but "liquid" electrical tape does have its uses. If you need some of the "real deal" electrical tape (wrapping) as used on our Studes, I've got an extra roll you can have.

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    • #3
      Does not work well in the cold, solvent(s) smell bad and can't be good for your health. Have not found a good use for it, but bought some to try it out. Personally I feel it was not worth the $, and will not buy it again unless I find a good use for it. Regards, Junior.
      sigpic
      1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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      • #4
        It has its uses, but I like to use the heat shrink type of insolation on my electrical splices. Just slide over the wire, solder the wires together or solder on connector slide tube in place and heat. Does a great job of sealing out moisture! The real deal tape can be purchased from many brand X restoration catalogs I got mine from classic industries, no adhesive just the tape.

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        • #5
          I have found it works wonders on the older ('55 and earlier) cloth covered wiring harnesses where the covering is fraying. Dab the liquid on the frayed areas, and let it soak in and dry. Go back and give it at least one or two more coats. Not for a showcar, but works very well on a driver.

          The kind I have used is the 'PlastiDip' type, same people that make the dip used for coating handles of tools, etc. Probably all of it is about the same. If the stuff gets thick, though, throw it out and get more.
          Paul
          Winston-Salem, NC
          Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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          • #6
            Originally posted by r1lark View Post
            I have found it works wonders on the older ('55 and earlier) cloth covered wiring harnesses where the covering is fraying. Dab the liquid on the frayed areas, and let it soak in and dry. Go back and give it at least one or two more coats. Not for a showcar, but works very well on a driver.
            Ahhh...now that's a great idea and one that I'll use when the weather is warmer. Good timing too as I'm cleaning-up a bunch of scabby wiring underneath my IP that has needed to be dealt with for decades. Junior.
            sigpic
            1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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            • #7
              What Paul said. The stuff works fairly well from a fresh can, but more than one coat is needed. Properly applied, I think it provides a better seal against moisture than either regular black tape or heat shrink, especially for triple splices and greater. It will wick in between the wires, whereas the other two leave a channel between parallel wires.

              But when the can gets old and the solvent evaporates, you get a useless rubbery blob, and no solvent in my stock will soften it again. They need to put it up in smaller cans. I find it useful but the waste bugs me.
              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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              • #8
                For some reason I see alot of windshield wiper motors that the mice have gotten to. For some reason mice love those wires. It sounds like this product would be good for this fix, so you need not unsolder and replace the wires...... ?

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                • #9
                  I also feel it works pretty well for insulating in areas where a wire may run through a hole in metal, the side of a distributor for instance.

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