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10 Significant Studebakers for 10K Posts

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  • SN-60
    replied
    Your quick Bob!

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
    jbwhttail--A REAL STUDEBAKER MAN! (and hats off to Nancy also )
    Under the circumstances, Ed, that might have worked as well...(had it been a "ten-gallon" Stetson, of course!) <GGG> BP

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by jbwhttail View Post
    Earl Drews' 1956 President 2 door did not have power seats, I remember it well. It started out as a black and white, was painted later yellow and white. I returned the car to black and white. It also had power steering but no power brakes.


    Funniest story ever on this car..... Nancy and I were visiting her grandmother in Michigan when Nancy was pregnant with our first, on the way home Nancy got to feeling ill. As we are doing 70 mph down interstate 69 Nancy looks at me and says, I'm going to get sick. My response........Don't you dare get sick inside or on the outside of this car, hold it till I can get stopped!!!!..........she did.
    Excellent, Joe; thanks for the clarification. (No wonder I couldn't keep the car's color scheme straight in my mind; it went from the OEM Black & White to Yellow & White and back to Black & White over the time I knew it! <GGG>)


    'Good "save" on the interior...and exterior; 'what a man! More <GGG> Bob

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  • SN-60
    replied
    jbwhttail-------------------------------A REAL STUDEBAKER MAN! ( and hats off to Nancy also )

    Leave a comment:


  • jbwhttail
    replied
    Earl Drews 1956 President 2 door did not have power seats, I remember it well. It started out as a black and white, was painted later yellow and white. I returned the car to black and white. It also had power steering but no power brakes.


    Funniest story ever on this car..... Nancy and I were visiting her grandmother in Michigan when Nancy was pregnant with our first, on the way home Nancy got to feeling ill. As we are doing 70 mph down interstate 69 Nancy looks at me and says, I'm going to get sick. My response........Don't you dare get sick inside or on the outside of this car, hold it till I can get stopped!!!!..........she did.

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
    To: Bob Palma--- I've always thought the shorter wheelbase models had a slight edge in day-to-day city driving (and parking). Also, over the miles, they might stay a bit 'tighter'----I could be wrong about all that though!
    No doubt the shorter-wheelbase models would stay tighter...and, of course, would be more maneuverable in traffic.

    As I said, Ed, we'd get some spirited discussion going if we tried to address the topic of "best postwar Studebaker!" BP

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  • SN-60
    replied
    To: Bob Palma--- I've always thought the shorter wheelbase models had a slight edge in day-to-day city driving (and parking). Also, over the miles, they might stay a bit 'tighter'----I could be wrong about all that though!

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by Johnnywiffer View Post
    How in the pluperfect heck does ANYONE remember all that minutia? I understand that you, BP, have all the records from the dealership. However, even so, I’d be hard-pressed to remember where to FIND such info. Heck, I don’t remember what I had for breakfast YESTERDAY, let alone in 1956. I THINK I was around for the discovery of fire and the wheel. But not who invented ‘em nor how much money they made or lost on the invention.

    When I write about happenings from the past, it’s because I have a sudden flash (truly!) and think, “Heck, I remember when….”and I write about it. But I sure don’t remember whether the weatherstripping on the rear fender of a ’51 Land Cruiser was painted or un-painted from the factory. Or whether a hood ornament was REAL gold-plated or fake.

    John
    Well, John, I've always been fascinated about how much the human mind can retain when it is interested in a topic...and, importantly, when the mind is relatively young.

    As you see, I was immersed in the 1950s car culture just about as much as a person barely aged double-digits could be...and loved every minute of it. 'Couldn't get enough of it, quite frankly.

    At age 8...eight, mind you....I was studying the 1954 Packard Salesman's Guide while seated on a chair in Palma Motors' original showroom. I discovered you could order air conditioning in a Packard! Man, was that seriously-good news!

    I remember running into my Dad's office and informing him of my discovery with all the attendant excitement as if I had just run into the office to tell him the Edgar County courthouse was on fire a block away.

    As if my Dad didn't already know that, of course...about the air conditioning, that is, because the courthouse wasn't ablaze.

    Is it any wonder my mother had serious doubts about my -ahem- propensity toward all things automotive? She was genuinely concerned about the matter.

    Oh, and I still have that 1954 Packard Salesman's Guide:

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by Bish View Post
    Bob, Do you remember the Jag XK 120 turned in on the '56 Golden Hawk? Kind of a special car to be traded at an independent dealer. Worth some money today. Bish
    Here ya' go, Bish (and anyone else interested).

    That Jaguar XK120 (I believe it was red, now that I think about it) might be worth a lot today, but when it was a three-year-old used car, all it could garner was $1,500, cash plus tax, no trade:

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
    Great story! About the '56 President, could that model, equipped as described, be considered the 'perfect' postwar Studebaker? (either a two-door like this, or a four door on the shorter wheelbase) They really drove nice!
    Well, Ed, SDCers would likely debate what constitutes the "best" postwar Studebaker until the cows had not only come home, but had been milked and put to bed. Personally, I'd think the 1956 President series would be close to the top of most lists, though, as you say.

    However, why not the longer-wheelbase President Classic? They rode even nicer than the shorter-wheelbase models.

    Generically, at least 1956 gave you 12-volt electrics and Flightomatic transmissions; definite improvements over 6 volts and Automatic Drive. BP

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  • Johnnywiffer
    replied
    How in the pluperfect heck does ANYONE remember all that minutia? I understand that you, BP, have all the records from the dealership. However, even so, I’d be hard pressed to remember where to FIND such info. Heck, I don’t remember what I had for breakfast YESTERDAY, let alone in 1956. I THINK I was around for the discovery of fire and the invention of the wheel. But don't remember who invented ‘em nor how much money they made or lost on the invention.

    When I write about happenings from the past, it’s because I have a sudden flash (truly!) and think, “Heck, I remember when….”and I write about it. But I sure don’t remember whether the weatherstripping on the rear fender of a ’51 Land Cruiser was painted or un-painted from the factory. Or whether a hood ornament was REAL gold-plated or fake.

    But someone does. Maybe we need to get someone to glean all the wheat from the chaff on the Forum and put it in a book. Call it “Not So Important Stuff That Someone Remembered One Day Then Forgot”. Index it so all you have to do is look up “What kinda bolt held the fake spare on the ’58 PH?” And you’d know. Could be used to settle all the arguments about such important questions as “What year did the factory change from LH to RH threads on lug nuts?” or “When were leather seats available on convertibles?”

    Yep, someone sure oughta do that little thing. But as Lou Costello said in “Africa Screams”, “Somebody else. Not me.”

    (See? I DID remember SOMEthing!)

    John
    Last edited by Johnnywiffer; 01-21-2012, 07:20 PM.

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  • SN-60
    replied
    Great story! About the '56 President, could that model, equiped as described, be considered the 'perfect' postwar Studebaker? (either a two-door like this, or a four door on the shorter wheelbase) They really drove nice!

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by Bish View Post
    Bob, Do you remember the Jag XK 120 turned in on the '56 Golden Hawk? Kind of a special car to be traded at an independent dealer. Worth some money today. Bish
    No, Bish; I do not remember the Jaguar.

    I DO remember my Dad screaming bloody murder at Harry Rhoads for being so flim-flammed as to taking that deal! Dad had no idea how they'd ever sell that Jaguar in a small farming community in the midwest, and he was right.

    He wound up shopping the car all over the place, wholesale auctions and such, and couldn't get 'er done, trying to get it sold. He ultimately sold it cheap to the owner of Stewart Hog Ring Company in Paris. (I'd look up and post that invoice, but I am not at home right now. I'm at my daughter's house babysitting overnight as both she and her husband are working at their respective medical jobs; she until midnight and he until 6AM.)

    Dad was right that they were going to lose money on that 1956 Golden Hawk deal, big time. I have most of the financial records from the dealership, as well as these Purchase Agreements (Retail Invoices). I once went through that whole deal since they took two cars in trade. They took another car in trade on the 1951 Studebaker Champion trade-in from Barrister McClain, so they had to recondition and sell it, too.

    By the time everything washed out, they had lost a little over $1,000 1956 DOLLARS on that Golden Hawk. Dad wished they'd never seen the car; a small dealership just couldn't afford to be taking a $1,000 hit on a car when he, Harry, and Uncle Milt were struggling to take home as close to $100 per week as possible from the place in 1956.

    Of course, that was then and this is now. If you read the cited page in Turning Wheels, Dad is more than happy to be associated with that car today! <GGG>

    My, how times change. BP

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  • Bish
    replied
    Bob, Do you remember the Jag XK 120 turned in on the '56 Golden Hawk? Kind of a special car to be traded at an independent dealer. Worth some money today.
    Bish

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by studegary View Post
    I don't know the number, but I am probably approaching the 10K posts mark. Do I have to come up with something special for that event <G>?
    Your number is constantly being updated and posted, Gary.

    Just look in the information right below your name any time you post.

    AFAIK, you can't remove it! BP

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