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#10 Studebaker collectibles - unusual key fob (Anyone read Yiddish?)

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  • #10 Studebaker collectibles - unusual key fob (Anyone read Yiddish?)

    http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/e...g?t=1326219297

    This is an original key fob that I am guessing is from Israel (1964). Does anyone else have one of these in their collection? Can anyone decipher the printing on the reverse side? For more on the Israeli assembly plant see the Jan. 2012 TW article by Amon Wirthiem (and Art Unger) on page 16-17.
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  • #2
    My guess is that the yiddish on the front says Lark.
    Jon Stalnaker
    Karel Staple Chapter SDC

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    • #3
      And all these years we have been underestimating your intelligence!!
      Richard Quinn
      Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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      • #4
        Richard Dusty here sent you a PM.

        Dusty Taylor

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        • #5
          Zaharaim Tovim Richard,
          I work for an Israeli company. I emailed a guy for a translation, but probably won't hear back until tomorrow.
          (Had I know I would be here 14 years and counting, I'd would have learned a bit more hebrew..)

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          • #6
            Actually, it's Hebrew; not Yiddish. My understanding (I could be wrong) is that Yiddish is a blending of Russion, German and Hebrew and is written with the latin alphabet.
            \"Ahh, a bear in his natural habitat...a Studebaker!\"

            51 Land Cruiser (Elsie)
            Jim Mann
            Victoria, B.C.
            Canada

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            • #7
              Originally posted by StudeMann View Post
              Actually, it's Hebrew; not Yiddish. My understanding (I could be wrong) is that Yiddish is a blending of Russion, German and Hebrew and is written with the latin alphabet.
              Got it, thanks.
              Richard Quinn
              Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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              • #8
                Ever wonder how to spell "Studebaker" in Hebrew?...
                Chris Dresbach

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by StudeMann View Post
                  Actually, it's Hebrew; not Yiddish. My understanding (I could be wrong) is that Yiddish is a blending of Russion, German and Hebrew and is written with the latin alphabet.
                  Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
                  Got it, thanks.
                  And Yiddish is rather closely related to the "Pennsylvania Dutch" that the Amish speak to boot.
                  --------------------------------------

                  Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                  Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                  "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

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                  • #10
                    Here's a translation. Yes this is written in 'original' Hebrew. Hebrew is more commonly written now in Latin characters.
                    My friend could tell it was quite old, based on the 6 digit phone number. Also it's from Haifa, which was the city the assembly plant was in. No surprise there I guess.
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by Michidan; 01-11-2012, 05:01 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Additional input

                      I work with an Israeli engineer and asked him to translate. Here is what he said:

                      It spells "Lark" in Hebrew where the image is and on the other side it gives the name address and phone number of a driving school by the name of "Hama'avir" which translate to "the mover" or the one who will "pass you" meaning pass the driving test.

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                      • #12
                        Great, thanks very much to both. You have solved the mystery. I was thinking that it
                        might be a dealer name, would not have guessed a driving school. I guess we can
                        speculate that the driving school had a fleet of Studebakers?
                        Richard Quinn
                        Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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