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  • Studebaker Accident Insurance Policy

    http://www.archive.org/details/dmbb08803

  • #2
    Should read Studebaker 'paid for' accident insurance policy, shouldn't it?
    Good find!


    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

    Comment


    • #3
      Yep.

      From the March 12, 1956 Paris [IL] Beacon-News.

      I've had this ad in Dad's dealer scrapbook ever since it was published, but 'always wondered why it didn't have the locally-added dealer tag line: Palma-Rhoads Motors: Packard-Nash-Studebaker. But it didn't. It was published in their local paper just as you see it:

      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

      Ayn Rand:
      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Interesting marketing angle. Nowadays, the lawyers and marketers would never approve a program like this. They'd say that "it might give people the idea that they're going to be in more accidents in a Studebaker... that they need that policy." Feh.

        Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

        Comment


        • #5
          What an interesting angle. Henry Kaiser started a health care company to provide an employee benefit when wages were frozen. That established the custom of getting hospitalization and health insurance through the employer. The rest of his empire is sold off, merged, traded away or shut down, but Kaiser Healthcare is Permanente.

          GE couldn't wait to get out of "consumer goods" and into insurance -- then couldn't wait to get out of that, too. You have to wonder what the insurance/investment landscape would look like now if the custom had arisen of buying accident insurance through your car maker. It would have made for some darned exciting dealer meetings, that's for sure. And they'd have never crashed that '59 BelAir.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by comatus View Post
            What an interesting angle. Henry Kaiser started a health care company to provide an employee benefit when wages were frozen. That established the custom of getting hospitalization and health insurance through the employer. The rest of his empire is sold off, merged, traded away or shut down, but Kaiser Healthcare is Permanente.

            GE couldn't wait to get out of "consumer goods" and into insurance -- then couldn't wait to get out of that, too. You have to wonder what the insurance/investment landscape would look like now if the custom had arisen of buying accident insurance through your car maker. It would have made for some darned exciting dealer meetings, that's for sure. And they'd have never crashed that '59 BelAir.
            Hear, hear; I like that idea, Mike. <GGG> BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #7
              'Looks like the 1956 Studebaker Life Insurance Policy idea is in deep do-do, per this Rumor Mill item from the July 1956 Motor Trend.

              'Better cash 'em out while you can: Hell hath no fury (Golden Commando engine notwithstanding) like an insurance broker's lobby scorned:



              <GGG> BP
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

              Comment


              • #8
                this may be a little OT, but another brain synapse fired...
                the first time i bought a car from a dealer (gm), was in 1974 (i was 19). a '73 Opel GT... loved that car...
                anyway, i recall the dealer placed in the sales contract "auto insurance" - not disability or life ins. - at a rate about 4 to 5 times my agent had quoted me before i went back in to close the deal.
                of course, i said "heck, no!" or words to that meant the same , and gave them my agent's card.

                was that "standard practice" back then? just curious...
                Kerry. SDC Member #A012596W. ENCSDC member.

                '51 Champion Business Coupe - (Tom's Car). Purchased 11/2012.

                '40 Champion. sold 10/11. '63 Avanti R-1384. sold 12/10.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Corvanti View Post
                  this may be a little OT, but another brain synapse fired...
                  the first time i bought a car from a dealer (gm), was in 1974 (i was 19). a '73 Opel GT... loved that car...
                  anyway, i recall the dealer placed in the sales contract "auto insurance" - not disability or life ins. - at a rate about 4 to 5 times my agent had quoted me before i went back in to close the deal.
                  of course, i said "heck, no!" or words to that meant the same , and gave them my agent's card.

                  was that "standard practice" back then? just curious...
                  Standard Practice might be best defined as whatever you can get away with in a given market.

                  Especially if you (or the customer) appears young and innocent. <GGG> BP

                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    thanks, Mr. P - that's what i thought, even back then.
                    Kerry. SDC Member #A012596W. ENCSDC member.

                    '51 Champion Business Coupe - (Tom's Car). Purchased 11/2012.

                    '40 Champion. sold 10/11. '63 Avanti R-1384. sold 12/10.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The money making gimmick that MOST if not all Car Dealers used was to "help you out" by FINANCING the Car for you.
                      The Dealer my Dad worked for used Bank of America, and I am sure they got their cut of that.
                      StudeRich
                      Second Generation Stude Driver,
                      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                        The money making gimmick that MOST if not all Car Dealers used was to "help you out" by FINANCING the Car for you.
                        The Dealer my Dad worked for used Bank of America, and I am sure they got their cut of that.
                        Most car dealers give the salesman or closer a cut of the profit on in-house financing. I worked for a dealer that retained all of the profit and did not even give the salesman a token payment. Besides that, the salesman (me) had to make out all of the paperwork and deal with the bank or finance company. I financed very few cars there. I sent the customers off to their credit union or bank where they got a better deal. Every once in a while, someone wanted everything done at the dealer just to keep things simpler for them. They didn't realize that this laziness cost them hundreds of dollars over the life of the loan. The factory representative came in and asked why our dealership had so few finance deals. I told him straight out the reason. The dealer principal/owner got VERY angry with me, but retaned me because I had a good reputation and a high sales rate and CSI of 100.
                        Gary L.
                        Wappinger, NY

                        SDC member since 1968
                        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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